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Bible Commentaries

A.W. Pink's Commentary on John and Hebrews

Old Testament

John Hebrews


A.W. Pink
Arthur Walkington Pink

Arthur Walkington Pink (April 1, 1886 - July 15, 1952) was an English Bible teacher who sparked a renewed interest in the exposition of Calvinism. Virtually unknown in his own lifetime, Pink became "one of the most influential evangelical authors in the second half of the twentieth century."

was born in Great Britain and immigrated to the U.S. to study at Moody Bible Institute. He pastored churches in Colorado, California, Kentucky, and South Carolina before becoming an itinerant Bible teacher in 1919. From 1925-1927 he Pastored in Sydney, Australia then went to visit his hometown of Nottingham, England before returning to the U.S. He returned to his native land in 1934, taking up residence on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, in 1940, and remained there until his death. Most of his works first appeared as articles in Studies in Scriptures, a monthly magazine concerned solely with the exposition of Scripture.

ink was virtually unknown and certainly unappreciated in his day. Independent Bible study convinced him that much of modern evangelism was defective. When Puritan and reformed books were generally disregarded by the Church as a whole, he advanced the majority of their principles with untiring zeal. The progressive spiritual decline of his own nation (Britain) was to him the inevitable consequence of the prevalence of a "gospel" that could neither wound (with conviction of sin) nor heal (via regeneration).

After Pink's death, his works were republished by The Banner of Truth Trust and reached a much wider audience as a result. Biographer Iain H. Murray observes of Pink, "the widespread circulation of his writings after his death made him one of the most influential evangelical authors in the second half of the twentieth century." His writing sparked a revival of expository preaching and focused readers' hearts on biblical living. Yet even today, Pink is left out of most biographical dictionaries and overlooked in many religious histories.

Pink was an ardent Calvinist and did not shrink from preaching and teaching the "doctrines of grace" otherwise known as the Five Points of Calvinism.

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