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E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Luke Overview

 

 


Luk
THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO LUKE

THE STRUCTURE OF THE BOOK AS A WHOLE.

"BEHOLD THE MAN" (
Zechariah 6:12).


Luke 1:12-52. PRE-MINISTERIAL. THE DESCENSION.
Luke 3:1-20. THE FORERUNNER.
Luke 3:21-38. THE BAPTISM:WITH WATER.
Luke 4:1-14. THE TEMPTATION:IN THE WILDERNESS.
Luke 4:14 - Luke 5:11. THE KINGDOM
Luke 5:12 - Luke 9:21. THE KING
Luke 9:22 - Luke 18:43. THE KING
Luke 19:12 - Luke 2:38. THE KINGDOM
Luke 22:39-46. THE AGONY:IN THE GARDEN.
Luke 22:47 - Luke 24:12. THE BAPTISM:OF SUFFERING (DEATH, BURIAL, ANDRESURRECTION).
Luke 24:13-49. THE SUCCESSORS.
Luke 24:50-53. POST-MINISTERIAL.


For the New Testament, and the order of the Books, see Appdx-96.
For the inter-relation of the Four Gospels, see the Structures on p. 1304.
For the Diversity of the Four Gospels, see Appdx-96.
For the Unity of the Four Gospels, see Appdx-97.
For the Fourfold Ministry of the Lord, see Appdx-119.
For the words, &c., peculiar to Luke""s Gospel, see some 260 words recorded in the notes.


NOTES ON LUKE""S GOSPEL.

The Divine purpose in the Gospel by Luke is to set forth the Lord not so much as the Messiah, "the King of Israel", as in Matthew""s Gospel,or as Jehovah""s servant, as in Mark; but as what He was in Jehovah""s sight, as the ideal MAN Man Whose name is the BRANCH" (
Zechariah 6:12). See the Structure of the Four Gospels on p. 1304.

In Luke, therefore, the Lord is specially presented as "the friend of publicans and sinners" the outcasts of society (
Luke 5:29, &c.; Luke 7:29, Luke 7:34, Luke 7:37, &c.; 15; Luke 18:9, &c.; 23:39, &c.); as manifesting tenderness, compassion, and sympathy (Luke 7:13; Luke 7:13; Luke 7:1, &c.; Luke 19:41, &c.; 23:28, &c.). Hence Luke alone gives the parable prejudice (Luke 6:6, Luke 6:27, &c.; 11:41, &c.; 13:1, &c.; 14:1, &c.; 17:11, &c.). Hence Luke alone gives the parable of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:30, &c.); and notes that the one leper who gave thanks to God was a Samaritan (Luke 17:16, Luke 17:18).

Hence also many references to women, who, so alien to Jewish custom, find frequent and honourable mention:Elisabeth, Anna, the widow of Nain (
Luke 7:11, Luke 7:15); the penitent woman (Luke 7:37, &c.); the ministering women (Luke 8:2, &c.); the "daughters of Jerusalem" (Luke 23:27, &c.); Martha (Luke 10:38, Luke 10:41) and Mary, of Bethany (Luke 10:39, Luke 10:42); Mary Magdalene (Luke 24:10). As the ideal Man, the Lord is presented as dependent on the Father, in prayer (Luke 3:21; Luke 5:16; Luke 1:12; Luke 9:18, Luke 9:29; Luke 11:1; Luke 18:1; Luke 22:32, Luke 22:41; Luke 34:46). On six definite occasions the Lord is shown in prayer; and no less than seven times "glorifying God" in praise is mentioned (Luke 2:20; Luke 5:25; Luke 7:16; Luke 13:13; Luke 17:15; Luke 18:43; Luke 23:47).

The Four Hymns are peculiar to Luke:the
Magnifiac of Mary (Luke 1:46-55); the Benedictus of Zacharias (Luke 1:68, Luke 1:79); the Nunc Dimittis of Simeon (Luke 2:29-32); and the Gloria in Excelsis of the angels (Luke 2:14).

The six Miracles peculiar to Luke (all characteristic of the presentation of the Lord in Luke) are:
1. The Draught of Fishes (
Luke 5:4, Luke 5:11).
Luke 5:2. The Raising of the Widow""s Son at Nain (Luke 7:11-18).
Luke 7:3. The Woman with a Spirit of Infirmity (Luke 13:11-17).
Luke 13:4. The Man with Dropsy (Luke 14:1, Luke 14:6).
Luke 14:5. The Ten Lepers (Luke 17:11-19).
Luke 17:6. The Healing of Malcus (Luke 22:50, Luke 22:51).

The eleven Parables peculiar to Luke (all having a like significance)are:
1. The Two Debtors (
Luke 7:41-43).
Luke 7:2. The Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30, Luke 10:37).
Luke 10:3. The Importunate Friend (Luke 11:5-8).
Luke 11:4. The Rich Fool (Luke 12:16-21).
Luke 12:5. The Barren Fig-tree (Luke 13:6-9).
Luke 13:6. The Lost Piece of Silver (Luke 15:8, Luke 15:10).
Luke 15:7. The Lost Son (Luke 15:11-32).
Luke 15:8. The Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-12).
Luke 16:9. The Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31).
Luke 16:10. The Unjust Judge and Importunate Widow (Luke 18:1-8).
Luke 18:11. The Pharisee and the Publican (Luke 18:9-14).

Other remarkable incidents and utterances peculiar to Luke may be studied with the same object and result (
Luke 3:10-14; Luke 10:1 Luke 10:20; Luke 19:1-10, Luke 19:41-44; Luke 22:44; Luke 23:7-12; Luke 23:27-31; Luke 23:34; Luke 23:40-43; Luke 24:50, Luke 24:53).

As to Luke himself:his name (Gr.
Loukas ) is probably an abbreviation of the Latin Lucanus , Lucilius or Lucius .* While he was the author of the Acts of the Apostles, he does not once name himself; and there are only three places where his name is found: Colossians 4:14. 2 Timothy 4:11. Philemon 1:24, .

From these and the "we" portions of the Acts (
Acts 16:10-17; Acts 20:5-15; Acts 21:1-18; Acts 27:1-44; Acts 28:1-16) we may gather all that can be known of Luke. We first hear of him at Troas (Acts 16:10), and from thence he may befollowed through the four "we" sections. See the notes on the Structure of the Acts as a whole.

It will be noted in the Structure of this Gospel as a whole that, while in John there is no Temptation, and no Agony, in Luke we not only have these, but the Pre-Natal Section (
Luke 1:5, Luke 2:5, A2, p. 1430) as well as the Pre-Ministerial, which is common to all the four Gospels.

 


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Bibliography Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke:4 Overview". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-0.html. 1909-1922.

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