corner graphic

Bible Commentaries

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

Job 31

 

 

Verse 16

A DARING APPEAL

‘If … then!’

Job 31:16; Job 31:22

I. Job protests the even-handedness of his dealings with his servants, alleging the principle which underlies the whole Christian teaching on the point, that we all have been made by the same Creator, as we have been redeemed by the same precious blood. He also insists on his benevolence to the widow and fatherless. He is careful to show that he had not failed in doing all the good that was within his reach. Alas! how few of us can say as much. How many occasions are drifted to our feet every day, which we heedlessly let pass!

II. Job had not boasted in his wealth, or worshipped the sun and moon, or rejoiced in the calamity of others, or failed in hospitality, or concealed known evil: in none of these things was he conscious of wrong. Instead of examining ourselves in a general way, it is wholesome to divide our life into compartments, and cross-question ourselves on each.

III. With this appeal he goes into the presence of God, and asks for a reply.—In the strong Gospel light we are too convicted of sin to dare to do this, and must rely upon the merits of Christ. In these alone can we approach the uncreated light.

Illustration

‘“If I have eaten my morsel alone”—

The patriarch spoke in scorn;

What would he think of the Church, were he shown

Heathendom, huge, forlorn,

Godless, Christless, with soul unfed,

While the Church’s ailment is fullness of bread,

Eating her morsel alone?

“I am debtor alike to the Jew and the Greek,”

The mighty Apostle cried;

Traversing continents, souls to seek,

For the love of the Crucified.

Centuries, centuries since have sped,

Millions are famishing, we have bread,

But we eat our morsel alone.

Ever of them who have largest dower

Shall Heaven require the more;

Ours is affluence, knowledge, power,

Ocean from shore to shore;

And East and West in our ears have said,

“Give us, give us your living Bread”;

Yet we eat our morsel alone.

“Freely as ye have received, so give,”

He bade Who hath given us all;

How shall the soul in us longer live,

Deaf to their starving call,

For whom the Blood of the Lord was shed,

And His Body broken to give them Bread,

—If we eat our morsel alone?’

Archbishop Alexander.


Verse 22

A DARING APPEAL

‘If … then!’

Job 31:16; Job 31:22

I. Job protests the even-handedness of his dealings with his servants, alleging the principle which underlies the whole Christian teaching on the point, that we all have been made by the same Creator, as we have been redeemed by the same precious blood. He also insists on his benevolence to the widow and fatherless. He is careful to show that he had not failed in doing all the good that was within his reach. Alas! how few of us can say as much. How many occasions are drifted to our feet every day, which we heedlessly let pass!

II. Job had not boasted in his wealth, or worshipped the sun and moon, or rejoiced in the calamity of others, or failed in hospitality, or concealed known evil: in none of these things was he conscious of wrong. Instead of examining ourselves in a general way, it is wholesome to divide our life into compartments, and cross-question ourselves on each.

III. With this appeal he goes into the presence of God, and asks for a reply.—In the strong Gospel light we are too convicted of sin to dare to do this, and must rely upon the merits of Christ. In these alone can we approach the uncreated light.

Illustration

‘“If I have eaten my morsel alone”—

The patriarch spoke in scorn;

What would he think of the Church, were he shown

Heathendom, huge, forlorn,

Godless, Christless, with soul unfed,

While the Church’s ailment is fullness of bread,

Eating her morsel alone?

“I am debtor alike to the Jew and the Greek,”

The mighty Apostle cried;

Traversing continents, souls to seek,

For the love of the Crucified.

Centuries, centuries since have sped,

Millions are famishing, we have bread,

But we eat our morsel alone.

Ever of them who have largest dower

Shall Heaven require the more;

Ours is affluence, knowledge, power,

Ocean from shore to shore;

And East and West in our ears have said,

“Give us, give us your living Bread”;

Yet we eat our morsel alone.

“Freely as ye have received, so give,”

He bade Who hath given us all;

How shall the soul in us longer live,

Deaf to their starving call,

For whom the Blood of the Lord was shed,

And His Body broken to give them Bread,

—If we eat our morsel alone?’

Archbishop Alexander.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Job 31:4". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/job-31.html. 1876.

Commentary Navigator
Search This Commentary
Enter query in the box below
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology