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Bible Commentaries

G. Campbell Morgan's Exposition on the Whole Bible

Joel 2

 

 

Verses 1-27

Having thus dealt with the actual visitation and its terrible devastation, and having called the people into the place of humiliation, the prophet rose to a higher level, and interpreted the visitation as indicating a deeper and more terrible judgment threatening them. In doing this, he made use of the figure of the blowing of a trumpet.

The first blast sounded a note of alarm as it announced the approach of the Day of Jehovah. With the figure of the locusts still in mind, the prophet described the swift, irresistible, and all-consuming character of the armies which were about to come as the scourge of God, being careful to declare that this whole movement would be under the command of Jehovah. However, the prophet declared that God still waited in patience and mercy. If the people would return to Him, He would spare them.

The second blast of the trumpet called the people to assemble in repentance. The character of the assembly was to be that of a fast, and its constitution the actual gathering together of all the people, from the youngest to the oldest. Being assembled, they were to cry for mercy, the ultimate reason being that the nations should not say, "Where is their God?" To such an act Jehovah would respond in grace.


Verse 28

Finally the prophet moved on to a yet higher level, and dealt wholly with things to come. The great word introducing the section is "afterward." Some of the things foretold have now been fulfilled, some are still in the future.

In looking toward the distant Day of Jehovah, Joel saw an intervening period of an entirely different character. This he described, ending his message with a declaration concerning the Day of the Lord, which was the real burden on his spirit. Of the intervening period he declared that its initiation would result from the outpouring of the Spirit upon all flesh. It would be characterized by prophecy, dreams, and visions. The signs of the end of this period and the approach of the Day of the Lord would be "wonders in the heavens and in the earth." From the terrors of the Day, those who called on the name of the Lord were to be delivered.

This is a perfect description of the Pentecostal age in which we now live, with a statement of the signs which will precede its end and a declaration of the way of deliverance from the terrors immediately to follow.

Finally the prophet saw in the far distance the ultimate Day of Jehovah. The last vision of the prophet is the complete fulfilment of the divine purpose in and through God's people, in which Jehovah will dwell in Ziona city holy and full of prosperity.

 


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Bibliography Information
Morgan, G. Campbell. "Commentary on Joel 2:4". "G. Campbell Morgan Exposition on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gcm/joel-2.html. 1857-84.

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