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Bible Commentaries

G. Campbell Morgan's Exposition on the Whole Bible

Judges 21

 

 

Verses 1-25

Uninstructed zeal, even in the cause of righteousness, often goes beyond its proper limits. The terrible carnage continued until not above six hundred men of the tribe of Benjamin were left. Another of those sudden revulsions which characterize the action of inflamed peoples is seen as Israel was suddenly filled with pity for the tribe so nearly exterminated. This pity, then, operated in ways that were wholly unrighteous. Wives were provided for the men of Benjamin by unjustified slaughter at Jabesh-gilead and by the vilest iniquity at Shiloh.

It is impossible to read this appendix to the Book of Judges, and especially the closing part of it, without being impressed with how sad is the condition of any people who act without some definitely fixed principle. Passion moves to purpose only as it is governed by principle. If it lacks that, it will march at one moment in heroic determination to establish high ideals and purity of life, and then almost immediately will burn and express itself in brutality and all manner of evil.

The writer of this book more than once drew attention to the fact that at that time there was no king in Israel. Undoubtedly he meant by this to trace the lawlessness to the lack of government. The truth was that Israel had lost its immediate relation to its one and only King.

 


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Bibliography Information
Morgan, G. Campbell. "Commentary on Judges 21:4". "G. Campbell Morgan Exposition on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gcm/judges-21.html. 1857-84.

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