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Bible Commentaries

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

1 Corinthians 16

 

 

Verses 1-4

The Collection For the Saints

Paul next gave directions concerning what appears to be the same collection mentioned in Romans 15:26-27. Some Jewish converts had been responsible for teaching Gentiles. Since they had helped them spiritually, the Gentiles desired to help the Jews materially (Remember: Corinth was the chief city of Achaia.) Paul used the example of the Macedonians to spur on the Corinthians (2 Corinthians 8:17; 2 Corinthians 9:1-15). The same was true the other way around. He used them both to encourage the Romans. Example is a great teacher.

The apostle"s instructions concerning the collection was an established practice of getting funds. The New International Version correctly translates, "On the first day of every week...." One was to determine his weekly contribution on the basis of his weekly gain. It was to be set aside in the treasury so it would not have to be gathered when Paul came (1 Corinthians 16:1-2).

Paul wanted them to select those to carry the money so there would be no accusations about misuse (2 Corinthians 8:19-21). A letter of introduction would be sent with them. If the fund was large enough to warrant it, Paul planned to go himself. We now know that it was large enough to warrant the apostle travelling with those who were selected (1 Corinthians 16:3-4; Acts 19:21; Acts 20:14; Acts 24:17).


Verses 5-9

A Change In Plans

Paul told them he planned to come to Corinth after he passed through Macedonia. Originally, he had planned to pass through Corinth on the way to Macedonia and again on his return, but he changed his plans to give them time to correct some problems. If the problems were corrected, Paul felt they could have a much more enjoyable visit. In fact, Paul was, at the time of writing, hoping to have a good long visit with the Corinthian brethren instead of two short visits. The change in his original plans also came because of the great opportunity he had at Ephesus. The opportunities are mentioned in Acts 19:1-20, while the adversities he faced follow in Acts 19:21-40 (1 Corinthians 16:5-9; see also 2 Corinthians 1:8-24; 2 Corinthians 2:1-2).


Verses 10-12

Visits By Timothy and Apollos

Timothy and Erastus (Acts 19:22) had set out by land for Macedonia. It seems word of trouble reached Paul after Timothy left and Titus carried this letter directly to Corinth. Titus must have met Timothy as he (Titus) was going back to Paul. This is concluded since Timothy is back with Paul during the second letter"s production (2 Corinthians 7:6-7; 2 Corinthians 7:13.) Paul was concerned that Timothy not become embroiled in the middle of their division since he was doing God"s work. Paul did not want the Corinthians to despise Timothy, perhaps because of his youth (1 Timothy 4:12). Young preachers should be encouraged in their work. Controversy can affect their life"s work.

Apollos is first mentioned in Acts 18:24-28; Acts 19:1. He went from Ephesus to Corinth in his preaching work. Paul had pleaded with him to go to Corinth with the others, but for some unnamed reason he would not go at the time mentioned (1 Corinthians 16:10-12).


Verses 13-24

Closing Instructions and Personal Remarks

Christians must be constantly on guard against Satan. Paul encouraged them to be firm in matters of faith and not let false teachers shake their beliefs as they had on the resurrection. He also urged them to be men in the faith and courageously stand in God"s strength. Still, the apostle reminded them that all of a Christian"s actions should be based on love. Such should end all strife (1 Corinthians 16:13-14).

Paul told them to be subject to those who lovingly ministered to the needs of fellow Christians. He especially singled out the family of Stephanas who had been the first converts in Achaia. The apostle felt he was with the Corinthians as long as Stephanas, Fortunatus and Achaicus were with him. While he could not see all of the Corinthians in person, Paul felt an empty spot had been filled by the coming of these three. He also felt the letter he wrote because of firsthand knowledge would provide for some of their greatest needs. So, he wanted the Corinthians to receive them as those who had helped (1 Corinthians 16:15-18).

Paul delivered greetings from some who wished the Corinthian church well, especially Aquila and Priscilla. He also wanted them to treat one another as friends. He then wrote a special hello with his own hand. The rest of the letter was probably dictated to someone who wrote it down (1 Corinthians 16:19-21).

The apostle also directed that those who did not love the Lord, should be judged and punished for their evil. He asked that the Lord come quickly so they might be judged. Likely, he also saw the Lord"s coming as a means of fulfilling another of his desires which was that the Corinthians would have the Lord"s blessings, especially heaven. Paul wanted them to know he loved them, despite the correction he had have to give in this letter. In fact, correction is an expression of genuine love (1 Corinthians 16:22-24).

 


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Bibliography Information
Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 16:4". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/1-corinthians-16.html. 2014.

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