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Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Genesis 2

 

 

Verses 1-3

The Seventh Day of Rest - Genesis 2:1-3 describes how God finished His creation in six days and rested on the seventh day. He ceased from His own works in order to enter into rest. One purpose of this rest was to allow His principles of faith that were made a part of the fabric of His creation to take effect and operate in His creation, particularly in mankind. We read in Hebrews 4:10 that we, too, enter into rest when we cease from our own works and serve the Lord.

Hebrews 4:10, "For he that is entered into his rest, he also hath ceased from his own works, as God did from his."

The Number Seven in the Holy Scriptures- The number seven will play an important role throughout the Scriptures as God uses it to bring to pass His divine plan and purpose of creation and redemption for mankind. It will appear in Genesis , in the Law of Moses, all the way until it plays a vital role in the book of Revelation. In the Law of Moses, the Sabbath was the day of rest for man. The seventh year was the Sabbath year where the land rested. The seventh Sabbath year was the year of Jubilee, when everything was to be restored to the rightful owner. The millennial thousand-year reign will be a rest from the evils of Satan, which is the seventh millennial since man was created.

Genesis 2:1 Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them.

Genesis 2:1Word Study on "were finished" - Strong says the Hebrew word "were finished" ( כָלָה) (H 3615) is a primitive root and means, "to end, whether intransitive (to cease, be finished, perish) or transitive (to complete, prepare, consume)."

Genesis 2:2 And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made.

Genesis 2:2Word Study on "rested" - Strong says the Hebrew word "rested" ( שָׁבַת) (H 7673) is primitive root means, "to repose, i.e. desist (from exertion)." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 71times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as, "cease 47, rest 11, away 3, fail 2, celebrate 1, misc 7."

Genesis 2:2Comments- Why did God rest on the Sabbath, since He was Almighty and needed no physical rest? I believe that He stopped and rested in order to see His Glory, the glory of His handiwork.

While teaching on the Creation story, I asked my little 5-year old daughter what God did on the seventh day. She quickly said, "He went to sleep." (October 27, 2003) Well, not exactly. He simply ended the work required to fulfill His office and plan. When I finish building something, I do not go to sleep. Rather, I stand back and admire the work of my hands. I enjoy watching something word that I put together. In the same way, God has stepped back in order to enjoy His creation.

When God entered into rest, He did so fully satisfied with His creation. His rest was eternal because He found full contentment in the creation of man and the heavens and earth. God loves us so much that He is fully satisfied with us. He need not look for another being to love, for He has rested forever with us in His mind.

Genesis 2:2Old Testament Quotes in the New Testament- Genesis 2:2 is quoted in Hebrews 4:4.

Hebrews 4:4, "For he spake in a certain place of the seventh day on this wise, And God did rest the seventh day from all his works."

Genesis 2:2Scripture References- Note a similar verse:

Exodus 20:11, "For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them Isaiah , and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it."

Note other biblical references to the Creation Story:

Nehemiah 9:6, "Thou, even thou, art LORD alone; thou hast made heaven, the heaven of heavens, with all their host, the earth, and all things that are therein, the seas, and all that is therein, and thou preservest them all; and the host of heaven worshippeth thee."

Psalm 33:6, "By the word of the LORD were the heavens made; and all the host of them by the breath of his mouth."

Psalm 102:25, "Of old hast thou laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens are the work of thy hands."

Isaiah 45:12, "I have made the earth, and created man upon it: I, even my hands, have stretched out the heavens, and all their host have I commanded."

Genesis 2:3 And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.


Verses 4-25

The Divine Commission of Adam and Eve - The passage in Genesis 2:4-25 emphasizes the divine commission of Adam and Eve in their respective roles, which are to take dominion over the earth. After the Scriptures tells us about the creation of the world in chapter one, it then focuses upon the creation of man and his role in God's creation. This is because man was the highest order in God's creation and it is through man that His creation will be able to fulfill its purpose. Since the theme of Scriptures is the redemption of mankind, it quickly focuses upon the issues surrounding man's fall and ultimate redemption, for He will redeem His creation through mankind because of the Fall of Adam and Eve.

Thus, after the Scriptures open with the story of God's creation ( Genesis 1:1 to Genesis 2:3), we then read a second but more detailed account of the creation of man ( Genesis 2:4-25). Although Genesis 1:26-28 mentioned the creation of man and woman on the sixth day of creation, then why are we given a second, more detailed, account of the creation of man and woman in chapter two; perhaps because this sets the stage for the genealogy of Adam, which takes us on a journey towards the fulfillment of the genealogy of Jesus Christ and His work of redemption on Calvary? Therefore, the book of Genesis will continue to narrow its stories down to the people Israel as His chosen people to carry out His plan of redemption for mankind. The New Testament will narrow God's focus to the Church of Jesus Christ. We then we find the nation of Israel being brought back into focus in Romans 9-11and the book of Revelation , which shows us that God will use this plan to bring redemption and restoration back to His entire creation. Thus, the Scriptures have taken us full circle in God's plan of redemption, for mankind first, then for His entire creation.

In Genesis 2:4-25 God called Adam to begin taking dominion over the earth. He was charged to dominion over the plant kingdom by tending the Garden of Eden ( Genesis 2:15), and he was charged to take dominion over the animal kingdom by naming each one of them as he determined their respective roles in serving mankind. Thus, Adam began to fulfill his divine calling.

The Creation of Woman - Genesis 2:18-25 records the creation of woman. Up until Genesis 2:18 God had said that everything He created was good. Now He observed that it was not a good thing for Adam to be alone. Thus, Genesis 2:18 is the first negative assessment that God has made regarding His creation. As we will see, I do not think that it was a mistake that God had made. Rather, it was the first time when God's divine principles of sowing and reaping would need to be implemented in order for man's needs to be met. In the next two verses ( Genesis 2:19-20), God gives man the task of naming all of the animals. Then in Genesis 2:21-22 God causes Adam to fall into a deep sleep and creates his help mate from his rib. It seems that the creation of the woman in Genesis 1:21-22 should have immediately followed God's recognition of man's need in Genesis 2:18. We see God stating that it was not good for man to be alone and that He would make him an help meet in Genesis 2:18. Then in Genesis 2:21-22 God makes him an help meet. Genesis 2:19-20 is inserted between God's assessment of the need and God's act of meeting that need. In other words, God gives man a job to do before He meets the need of Adam. Why is this the case? In this passage, as Adam names all of the animals, he saw male and female animals and how God designed the animal kingdom. He then recognized a lack in his own life of such a companion; for the Scripture says, "but for Adam there was not found an help meet for him." It was this exercise of naming the animals that God had assigned to him that made Adam aware of his need, which was the lack of a companion. This assignment also helped man to understand that he had a higher calling than the animals because he was of a higher order.

We know from Genesis 2:18 that Adam had a need. In order to have his need met by God, he first had to take care of God's needs. God needed Adam to set the animal kingdom in order by naming each of them ( Genesis 2:19-20). When he met God's needs, then God in turn moved and met his need of an help mate ( Genesis 2:21-22).

How often had God given me a provision and I did not recognize it nor appreciate it. Or, I may have prayed for it, but because I was not ready for it, I did not recognize or accept it when it came. Perhaps God took Adam to a place by this exercise where he was able to recognize the fact that his help meet was also to look like him so that he could recognize and receive and love the woman as his own help mate. Otherwise, he may have thought that the woman was created for a different purpose than for him.

God has a purpose and a plan tailor made for each of us. He must take us to a place of acknowledging our need and crying out to Him before He will meet that need. Just because we have a need does not mean that God will immediately provide that need. Neither do you treat your growing children this way. Otherwise, they would not appreciate and manage the provision that you do give them. We must allow our children to come to a place of maturity where they can properly manage the blessings that we give to them. Hard work is often the path to maturity in order to receive and appreciate such blessings from parents.

For example, when my wife first came into Pentecost by joining Calvary Cathedral International, a full Gospel church, she was slain in the Spirit a number of times and even physically healed. These events caused her to recognize that there was something lacking in her spiritual growth. She understood that there was more to God than she had experienced and she wanted more. She soon began to speak in tongues and to attend Bible school. God had to show her this need in her life before she would pursue it and embrace these blessings. The need had been there since her birth, but was not recognized until God mightily touched her life. The need could not be met until she understood that need.

The Method by Which God Created the Woman- It is interesting to examine the method of how God made the woman. He could have made her like He made the other female animals; however, He chose in His design over creation to make the woman from the rib of man. If we look for a scientific answer as to why God chose the rib we discover some amazing facts. The Scriptures tell us that God took the rib from Adam and "built it into a woman." This Hebrew word describes woman's creation as a process. Modern science has discovered that within bone marrow lay immature cells called stem cells. Their normal function is to produce the three types of blood cells needed in the body, which are white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. These stem cells also have the function to develop into mature cells that produce fat, cartilage, bone, tendons, and muscle. Scientists have isolated these cells and transferred them into cell cultures and encouraged them to reproduce. One article from the American Federation for Aging Research says that the potential for use of these cells in tissue engineering, cell therapy and gene therapy is just beginning to be understood. 84] An article from Science Blog says that new research from the Oregon Health and Science University shows that bone marrow stem cells, when exposed to damaged liver tissue, can quickly convert into healthy liver cells and help repair the damaged organ. 85] In other words, scientists are discovering that these bone marrow stem cells have the potential to create the organs and other parts of the human body. It seems that when God created woman from the rib of Adam, He causes these stem cells to perform the functions that they were created to do, which was to grown into the various parts of the human body.

84] Lisa Chippendale, Stem Cells: Penetrating the Mysteries of a Potential Cure-All [on-line]; accessed 13March 2009; available from http://websites.afar.org/site/PageServer?pagename=IA_feat 24; Internet.

85] OHSU Researchers Use Stem Cells to Repair Liver Damage in Mice, in Science Blog (2000) [on-line]; accessed 13March 2009; available from http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/2000/D/200003224.html; Internet.

Why would God take the bone from Adam's rib? The answer probably lies in the fact that a person can have a rib bone removed without if affecting his physical performance. If the bone had been taken from his leg, he would not have been able to walk properly, or from his arm and he would not have been able to use his hand and arm properly, or his back and he would have problems in movement. The one place in the human body where a bone can be removed without imposing any restrictions upon the human body would be a rib bone.

Woman as Man's Help Mate - God created the man first to establish his purpose and plan on earth. God held a relationship with man before He created the woman, who would also have an intimate relationship with the man. This reflects that importance of a man holding his relationship with God of higher priority that with his wife, so that in following God's plan, the wife will also be blessed with the best that the man can provide for her. In the book of Job , God's servant Job held his tongue even when his own wife told him to curse God and die ( Job 2:9). In this act of obeying God rather than yielding to the woman, both were blessed in the end of this great trial. Also, when Abraham obeyed God and departed for the land of Canaan, his wife's obedience to follow him resulted in blessings upon them both.

The Institution of Marriage - Genesis 2:18-25 records the institution of marriage between a man and a woman. This story tells us how God created Eve from Adam's rib and gave her to the man as his wife. God created the woman in a unique way, different from any beast or even Adam. He did this in order to establish the institution of marriage. While the animals and beasts mated indiscriminately among the herds, Adam recognized that the woman was a part of himself because God took her from his rib, someone to be cherished; thus, her name became woman. The manner in which God created the woman caused the man to see themselves as one, one flesh in union with one another. In this way, intimacy was formed between the man and the woman. Had the woman been created separate from Adam, he might have viewed his relationship with her casually, as the beasts did with one another. Instead, they became united in heart and mind as well as the physical union used to create the woman, creating the institution of marriage that is held sacred between a man and a woman.

It is interesting to note that the Scriptures do not say Adam and Eve lived happily ever after, a phrase we often use in modern story telling. The Scriptures never say that Adam and Eve's marriage was a happy marriage because God knows that this couple must work at having such an intimate relationship as any other married couple. In other words, a happy marriage does not come automatically. It is a process of learning each one's needs and being willing to sacrifice one's self to meet those needs. People initially marry someone thinking that he or she will make me happy, rather than going into a marriage with the attitude of making the other happy.

A marriage between a man and a woman initially meets a person's emotional and sexual needs, but spiritual unity and intimacy take time for any married couple. For example, when God asked Adam why he ate of the forbidden tree, he blamed Eve, showing that Adam was not intimate with Eve. The Scriptures read "the LORD God said, It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him an help meet for him," ( Genesis 2:18) referring to Adam's need for companion, and "Adam knew Eve." ( Genesis 4:1), referring to his sexual need. This is why happiness is not automatic in any marriage, since maturity comes through the process of time and a willingness for both to sacrifice themselves.

Jewish Tradition Regarding the Creation of Woman - Jewish tradition says that God created woman on the sixth day of the second week of Creation after Adam named the animals on the first five days of the second week (The Book of Jubilees 36-7).

"And He awaked Adam out of his sleep and on awaking he rose on the sixth day, and He brought her to him, and he knew her, and said unto her: ‘This is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called [my] wife; because she was taken from her husband.'" (The Book of Jubilees 36-7)

Genesis 2:4 These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heavens,

Genesis 2:4Word Study on "generations" - BDB says the Hebrew word "generations" ( תֹּולֵדֹות) (H 8435) means, "descendants, results, proceedings, generations, genealogies." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 39 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "generations 38, birth 1." Strong says this word comes from the primitive root ( יָלַד) or ( לֵדָה) (H 3205), which means, "to bear, bring forth, beget, gender, travail."

Comments- The Hebrew word that is translated "generations" is used thirteen times in the book of Genesis , which verses are listed below. This word is contained in key verses that serve to identify the major divisions of this book. In other words, these key verses will distinguish the divisions of the scenes in the narrative material of the book of Genesis.

Genesis 2:4, "These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heavens,"

Genesis 5:1, "This is the book of the generations of Adam. In the day that God created Prayer of Manasseh , in the likeness of God made he him;"

Genesis 6:9, "These are the generations of Noah: Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God."

Genesis 10:1, "Now these are the generations of the sons of Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth: and unto them were sons born after the flood."

Genesis 10:32, "These are the families of the sons of Noah, after their generations, in their nations: and by these were the nations divided in the earth after the flood."

Genesis 11:10, "These are the generations of Shem: Shem was an hundred years old, and begat Arphaxad two years after the flood:"

Genesis 11:27, "Now these are the generations of Terah: Terah begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran; and Haran begat Lot."

Genesis 25:12, "Now these are the generations of Ishmael, Abraham"s Song of Solomon , whom Hagar the Egyptian, Sarah"s handmaid, bare unto Abraham:"

Genesis 25:13, "And these are the names of the sons of Ishmael, by their names, according to their generations: the firstborn of Ishmael, Nebajoth; and Kedar, and Adbeel, and Mibsam,"

Genesis 25:19, And these are the generations of Isaac, Abraham"s son: Abraham begat Isaac:"

Genesis 36:1, "Now these are the generations of Esau, who is Edom."

Genesis 36:9, "And these are the generations of Esau the father of the Edomites in mount Seir:"

Genesis 37:2, "These are the generations of Jacob. Joseph, being seventeen years old, was feeding the flock with his brethren; and the lad was with the sons of Bilhah, and with the sons of Zilpah, his father"s wives: and Joseph brought unto his father their evil report."

Genesis 2:4Word Study on "YHWH" - Genesis 2:4 contains the first use of the Hebrew word "YHWH" ( יְהוָֹה) (H 3068) in the Holy Scriptures. The Jews considered this name too holy to pronounce, so they changed its vowel sounds and pronounced it "Jehovah." The second chapter of Genesis reveals that the creator of the heavens and earth is in fact YHWH, which is His name. Strong says this name literally means, "the self-existing one," which reveals that He has no beginning or end.

Genesis 2:5 And every plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before it grew: for the LORD God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground.

Genesis 2:5Word Study on "before" - Strong says the Hebrew word "before" ( טֶרֶם) (H 2962) is used as an adverb and means, "not yet," or "before." The Enhance Strong says it is used at least 57 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "before, ere, not yet, neither."

Comments- The ASV gives a better translation of Genesis 2:5 when rendering the adverb ( טֶרֶם) as "not yet."

"And no plant of the field was yet in the earth, and no herb of the field had yet sprung up; for Jehovah God had not caused it to rain upon the earth: and there was not a man to till the ground."

Many modern translations also prefer the translation "not yet."

NIV, "…no shrub of the field had yet appeared on the earth and no plant of the field had yet sprung up; the Lord God had not sent rain on the earth and there was no man to work the ground."

RSV, "when no plant of the field was yet in the earth and no herb of the field had yet sprung up--for the LORD God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was no man to till the ground."

YLT, "no shrub of the field is yet in the earth, and no herb of the field yet sprouteth, for Jehovah God hath not rained upon the earth, and a man there is not to serve the ground."

These modern translations explain the reason for the earth not having plants and herbs of the field yet growing across the face of the earth, because there was as yet no rain. This type of rain would not come until the time of Noah after the flood. Until then, the next verse ( Genesis 2:6) explains how God caused a mist of water vapour to come up from the earth and water the surface of the ground. We read of the barrenness of the earth outside of the Garden of Eden in the first book of Adam and Eve. Genesis 2:5 seems to support this extra-biblical description of the ancient world immediately after the Fall.

Genesis 2:6 But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.

Genesis 2:7 And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.

Genesis 2:7 — "And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground" - Comments- Jesse Duplantis comments on Genesis 2:7 by saying that Adam's physical body was not created; rather, it was formed out of the dust of the ground. It was his spirit that was created by God at the time that He breathed into Adam's nostrils the breath of life. 86]

86] Jesse Duplantis, Jesse Duplantis (New Orleans: Louisiana), on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California, 2008), television program.

Genesis 2:7 — "and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life" - Comments- The creation of man was different than that of all other creatures. At his creation man became a spirit being as God breathed into the "breath," or "spirit," of life. All other creatures have a body and a soul. Man alone was triune, as was God, being created as a spirit, soul and body. Therefore, man will live eternally, but I do not think this is the case with animals. However, we do have verses that tell us about animals have the "breath of life," which may be a reference to a spirit ( Genesis 7:15; Genesis 7:22).

Genesis 7:15, "And they went in unto Noah into the ark, two and two of all flesh, wherein is the breath of life."

Genesis 7:22, "All in whose nostrils was the breath of life, of all that was in the dry land, died."

Genesis 2:7 — "and man became a living soul" - Comments- Andrew Wommack notes that before the "breath of life," which refers to the spirit of Prayer of Manasseh , was imparted into Adam, his physical body had no life ( James 2:26). 87]

87] Andrew Wommack, Spirit, Soul & Body (Colorado Springs, Colorado: Andrew Wommack Ministries, Inc, 2005), 11-12.

James 2:26, "For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also."

Genesis 2:7Comments- When a person dies, the opposite of that described in Genesis 2:7 happens; his spirit departs from his physical body and returns to God ( Ecclesiastes 12:7).

Ecclesiastes 12:7, "Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was: and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it."

Genesis 2:7Old Testament Quotes in the New Testament- The phrase "and man became a living soul" Genesis 2:7 in quoted in 1 Corinthians 15:45.

1 Corinthians 15:45, "And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit."

Genesis 2:8 And the LORD God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed.

Genesis 2:8 — "And the LORD God planted a garden eastward in Eden" - Word Study on "garden" - Strong says the Hebrew word "garden" "gan" ( גַּן) (H 1588) means, "a garden." BDB adds the additional meaning, "an enclosure."

Word Study on "Eden" - Strong says the Hebrew word "Eden" ( עֵדֶן) (H 5731) means, "delight, pleasure." It occurs 17 times in the Old Testament, being used only as a proper name. It refers to the Garden of Eden on 11occasions and it refers to individuals, one being a Gershonite Levite, the son of Joah who lived in the days of King Hezekiah of Judah, on 6 occasions ( 2 Chronicles 29:12; 2 Chronicles 31:15). Strong says this Hebrew word comes from the primitive root ( עָדַן) (H 5727), which means, "to be soft, or pleasant." There are three other occasions in which the similar word "Eden" ( עֶדֶן) (H 5729) is used in reference to a place conquered by Assyria; probably located in the northwest of Mesopotamia.

Comments- It is interesting to note the fact that God "planted" a garden in Eden. Up until this time He had spoken various aspects of His creation into existence. In the creation story of Genesis 1:1 to Genesis 2:3 the Lord spoke and created the Heavens and the Earth. In the second story that records the creation of Adam and Eve, the text says that "God formed" ( Genesis 2:7), "God planted" ( Genesis 2:8), and "God made to grow" ( Genesis 2:9). How did God form Prayer of Manasseh , plant a garden and make the trees grow? We know that He first created all things by His Word, as mentioned in 2 Peter 3:5-7, which explains how by His Word God creates all things, sustains all things, and will one day destroy this present heavens and earth. However, God now took the clay that makes up the earth and "formed" man. He then took the seed from the trees He had made and "planted" a garden, "sowing" seed in the ground to cause a garden to come forth. The reason God "planted a garden" rather than "speaking" a garden into existence is because He instituted the principle of seed-time and harvest upon the earth in Genesis 1:28-30, so the earth was under the dominion of that law. The earth held the seed in its warm, moist soil; the water germinated the seed; and the sun caused the seedlings to grow. Therefore, God now operated in men's lives and in nature by this law. Where did God get this seed to sow? Perhaps it came from the plants that were made on the third day of creation.

2 Peter 3:5-7, "For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water: Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished: But the heavens and the earth, which are now, by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men."

Genesis 2:8 — "and there he put the man whom he had formed" - Comments- God planted this garden by sowing. He then placed Adam in this garden to watch over this process of sowing and reaping. God designed the Garden of Eden for a number of reasons. One purpose was to teach Adam the divine principles of sowing and reaping and how to appropriate them in his own life.

Genesis 2:8Comments- The Garden of Eden (The Reason for Its Creation was to have Fellowship with Man) - The reason that God made the Garden of Eden was so that He could have fellowship with man. The fact that it was located "eastward" implies that God dwelt in a physical location, just as we see that Melchizedek dwelt in Jerusalem ( Genesis 14:18-20). This place served somewhat as a sanctuary, or a holy place, where God was able to come and meet with Adam in the cool of the day. The Book of Jubilees 312says that this garden was holier than all the places on the earth. This is why God had to drive man out of the Garden after the Fall, since no sin can dwell in His presence.

Genesis 14:18-20, "And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine: and he was the priest of the most high God. And he blessed him, and said, Blessed be Abram of the most high God, possessor of heaven and earth: And blessed be the most high God, which hath delivered thine enemies into thy hand. And he gave him tithes of all."

Genesis 2:8Comments- The Garden of Eden (Lessons on Sowing and Reaping for Man) - We must not overlook an important reason for God placing man in the Garden of Eden to tend it. The Scriptures tell us that the field is there to benefit all of us. For even the king is served by the harvest of the field ( Ecclesiastes 5:9). By these labours of tending the earth, the Lord was to teach mankind the principles of sowing and reaping. As they saw this principle manifested in the natural, they would be able to then apply this principle to the spiritual realm. Perhaps the most important divine law that man was to learn was the law of seedtime and harvest, of sowing and reaping.

Ecclesiastes 5:9, "Moreover the profit of the earth is for all: the king himself is served by the field."

An additional insight into the fact that Adam tended the Garden is to note that Adam had a particular task or duty ordained by God before the Fall. If man had not fallen, we still would all be assigned duties. These duties would be subject to the law of sowing and reaping. Thus, we can be assured that in Heaven we will be assigned divine duties, which are also subjected to the law of sowing and reaping.

Genesis 2:8Comments- The Garden of Eden (Its Location) - Genesis 2:8 tells us that "the LORD God planted a garden eastward in Eden." The whereabouts of this ancient Garden of Eden, as it is called, has always been a mystery. The Garden of Eden was located "eastward" in relation to what proximity? (1) Perhaps it was eastward of the homeland of writer of Genesis , which fits the location of the author Moses while in the wilderness. If Moses wrote the Pentateuch, this would put Eden to the east of the land of Palestine. We also know that during the time of the Patriarchs the land of the East was Babylonia and Mesopotamia, the region that is now modern Iraq; or, (2) perhaps "eastward" is in proximity to the place where man was created. For example, The Book of Jubilees (333) tells us that God made man in the land of Elda before placing man in the Garden of Eden; and we know according to Genesis 4:16 that the land of Nod was located east of Eden.

Genesis 4:16, "And Cain went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the east of Eden."

George Wright tells us that "the Assyrian inscriptions idinu (Accadian, edin) means ‘plain' and it is from this that the biblical word is probably derived." Thus, its location would be on the well-watered plains somewhere in the vicinity of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. The most likely place for Eden in which archeological evidence strongly supports, is in the Euphrates Valley near the area of Eridu, not far from the ancient city of Babylon. It is suggested that several thousand years ago, the Persian Gulf extended at least one hundred (100) miles upstream to the area of Eridu, and that deposits of river silt have moved the mouth of the Persian Gulf down to its present location. In fact, the ancient Babylonians called the Persian Gulf by the name "nar marratum," meaning "the bitter river." As further support, cuniform inscriptions found near Eridu testify to a garden being located in this area, called a "holy place," where a sacred palm tree grew. This tree of life appears frequently upon these inscriptions with two guardian spirits standing on either side. One other additional support for the region around Babylon being the location of the ancient Garden of Eden is the fact that the greatest supplies of fossil fuels in the world have been discovered in this region of the Middle East. We know that such large quantities of fossil fuels originated from a vast source of plant material. Apparently, the city of Babylon, which has been characterized throughout Scriptures as the seat of Satan on earth, is found in the area of the Garden of Eden simply because Satan has tried to move in and control the world from the very site that God originally chose to make a holy place where He could commune with man. 88]

88] George Frederick Wright, "Eden," in International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, ed. James Orr (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, c 1915, 1939), in The Sword Project, v 1511 [CD-ROM] (Temple, AZ: CrossWire Bible Society, 1990-2008).

Genesis 2:8Comments- The Garden of Eden (Its Potential to Expand Across the Earth) - When God made man and woman, His plan was for them to be fruitful and multiply and to cover the face of the earth. It is very possible that in like manner, God created the Garden of Eden as a place where all plants and animals were placed so that they would reproduce and go forth also to inhabit the earth. They would naturally follow the four rivers that went forth to water the four corners of the earth and eventually cover the earth. This is the way that the earth was Revelation -inhabited after the Flood in the time of Noah. Thus, the Garden of Eden would have been served as a breeding ground for the plant and animal kingdoms to begin their procreation. This would mean that much of the earth in the early days of creation was completely uninhabited. This is the description given in the extra-biblical writing called The First Book of Adam and Eve. 89] When they were driven out of the Garden of Eden, they found the earth barren in comparison to the Garden.

89] The Books of Adam and Eve, trans. Wells, in The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament in English With Introductions and Critical and Explanatory Notes to the Several Books, vol 2, ed. R. H. Charles, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913), 123-154.

Genesis 2:9 And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.

Genesis 2:9 — "And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food" - Comments- How did God make trees grow? He did it by His Word, as mentioned in 2 Peter 3:5-7, which explains how by His Word God creates all things, sustains all things, and will one day destroy this present heavens and earth.

2 Peter 3:5-7, "For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water: Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished: But the heavens and the earth, which are now, by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men."

Genesis 2:9 — "the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil" - Comments- God planted the two trees in the Garden of Eden called the tree of life and the tree of knowledge of good and evil. This was so that man would have a choice of whether or not to serve Him. God created man with a free will. God wanted man to serve Him with his free will and not out of compulsion. In the Garden of Eden man had a choice to show his love and obedience to God.

Genesis 2:9Comments- Genesis 2:9 shows God's goodness as mentioned in James 1:17. God gave to man good things for him to enjoy.

James 1:17, "Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning."

Comments- The Four Rivers in the Garden of Eden - Genesis 2:10-14 describes four rivers pouring forth from the Garden of Eden. If we believe in continental drift and in the movement of tectonic plates, as scientific evidence and many Creationist Bible scholars support, we can easily imagine a time before the Flood when all of the continents were contained in one single mass of land. Perhaps these four rivers with their tributaries were designed to water this entire landmass. Thus, this passage in Genesis gives us a picture of four rivers going forth from the Garden of Eden to water the four corners of this land mass, or the north, south, east and west. The first river Pison served to water the whole land of Havilah. The second river Gihon watered the whole land of Ethiopia. The third river Hiddekel watered the region of Assyria. The fourth river Euphrates is not identified with any particular land. Note that Josephus viewed the great river that ran out from the garden as the one ocean that encompassed the earth.

"Now the garden was watered by one river, which ran round about the whole earth, and was parted into four parts. And Phison, which denotes a multitude, running into India, makes its exit into the sea, and is by the Greeks called Ganges. Euphrates also, as well as Tigris, goes down into the Red Sea. Now the name Euphrates, or Phrath, denotes either a dispersion, or a flower: by Tiris, or Diglath, is signified what is swift, with narrowness; and Geon runs through Egypt, and denotes what arises from the east, which the Greeks call Nile." (Josephus, Antiquities 113)

Such an image of a single source of water going forth reminds us of the heavenly description of the throne of God in the final chapter of Revelation with the River of Life flowing out ( Revelation 22:1). Thus, the Holy Bible begins with a clear description of Paradise with its river that brings life, and it ends with a description of our heavenly paradise call Heaven with its River of Life.

Revelation 22:1, "And he shewed me a pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb."

Recent satellite images of Iraq have revealed two "dead" rivers that feed into the upper part of the Persian Gulf. These two ancient rivers come, one from the east and one from the west, and meet together at the mouth of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers as they empty into the mouth of the Persian Gulf. Archeologists, such as Juris Zarins, Calvin Schlabach and others, believe this is the most convincing evidence to date of the original location of the Garden of Eden. At this location four rivers once met together at the Persian Gulf; research suggests this region was once lush and fertile; the ancient river that runs through central Saudi Arabia fits the description of "Pison: that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold," possibly referring to the fine gold found in this region since ancient times. 90]

90] James A. Sauer, "The River Runs Dry: Creation Story Preserves Historical Memory," Biblical Archaeology Review, Vol 22, No 4, July/August 1996, pp 52-54, 57, 64; Molly Dewsnap, "The Kuwait River," Biblical Archaeology Review, Vol 22, No 4, July/August 1999, pp 55; Willie E. Dye, Lost Garden of Eden River Found, New Covenant Institute of Biblical Archaeology [on-line]; accessed 13March 2009; available at http://www.nciba.us/eden.htm; Internet.

Genesis 2:10 And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads.

Genesis 2:11 The name of the first is Pison: that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold;

Genesis 2:11Word Study on "Pison" - BDB says the Hebrew word "Pison" ( פִּישֹׁון) (H 6376) literally means, "increase," and that it refers to one of the four rivers found in the Garden of Eden. This word is used only one time in the Scriptures. Strong says this word comes from the primitive root ( פּוּשׁ) (H 6335), which means, "to spread, to act proudly."

Genesis 2:12Word Study on "Havilah" - Strong says the Hebrew word "Havilah" ( חֲוִילָה) (H 2341) literally means, "circle." BDB says that the land of Havilah was "a part of Eden through which flowed the river Pison (Araxes); was probably the Grecian Colchis, in the northeast corner of Asia Minor, near the Caspian Sea," or "a district in Arabia of the Ishmaelites named from the second son of Cush; probably the district of Kualan, in the northwestern part of Yemen." Also, Havilah was the second son of Cush ( Genesis 10:7).

Genesis 10:7, "And the sons of Cush; Seba, and Havilah, and Sabtah, and Raamah, and Sabtecha: and the sons of Raamah; Sheba, and Dedan."

Genesis 2:12 And the gold of that land is good: there is bdellium and the onyx stone.

Genesis 2:12Word Study on "bdellium" - BDB says the Hebrew word "bdellium" ( בְּדֹלַח) (H 916) means, "bdellium (i.e. gum resin)." Strong says it comes from the primitive root ( בָּדַל) (H 914), which means, "to divide, to separate." This word is only used two times in the Old Testament ( Genesis 2:12, Numbers 11:7). The ISBE says this word "points to the identification of it with the fragrant resinous gum known to the Greeks as bdellion, several kinds being mentioned by Dioscorides and Pliny." 91]

91] James Orr, "Bdellium," in International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, ed. James Orr (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, c 1915, 1939), in The Sword Project, v 1511 [CD-ROM] (Temple, AZ: CrossWire Bible Society, 1990-2008).

Numbers 11:7, "And the manna was as coriander seed, and the colour thereof as the colour of bdellium."

Genesis 2:12Word Study on "onyx" - BDB defines the Hebrew word "onyx" ( שֹׁהַם) (H 7718) to mean, "a precious stone or gem, probably onyx, chrysoprasus, beryl, malachite." The Enhanced Strong says this Hebrew word is used 11times in the Old Testament, being translated "onyx 11."

Genesis 2:12Comments- Arabia was famous for its gold. Most scholars believe that the land of Havilah was in Arabia.

Genesis 2:13 And the name of the second river is Gihon: the same is it that compasseth the whole land of Ethiopia.

Genesis 2:13Word Study on "Gihon"- BDB says the Hebrew word "Gihon" ( גִּיחֹון) (H 1521) is the name of "one of the four rivers found in the Garden of Eden," and that it literally means, "bursting forth." BDB says this same name was used later in the Scriptures for "a spring near Jerusalem where the anointing and proclaiming of Solomon as king took place." This Hebrew word is used six times in the Scriptures, but only one of those uses refers to the river Gihon. The other five uses refer to a spring near Jerusalem. Strong says this word comes from the primitive root ( גָּחָה) (H 1518), which means, "to burst forth." Josephus identifies this river with the Nile River, "Geon, which runs through Egypt, is the same which the Greeks call Nile." (Josephus, Antiquities 113)

Genesis 2:14 And the name of the third river is Hiddekel: that is it which goeth toward the east of Assyria. And the fourth river is Euphrates.

Genesis 2:14Word Study on "Hiddekel" - BDB tells us that the great river Hiddekel, Hebrew ( חִדֶּקֶל) (H 2313), is "one of the rivers of Eden, which coursed east toward Assyria. It is better known as the Tigris (the LXX equivalent)," and that the word "Hiddekel" literally means "rapid." This word is only found two times in the Old Testament ( Genesis 2:14, Daniel 10:4).

Daniel 10:4, "And in the four and twentieth day of the first month, as I was by the side of the great river, which is Hiddekel;"

Genesis 2:14Word Study on "Euphrates" - BDB identifies the Hebrew word "Euphrates" ( פְּרָת) (H 6578) with the Euphrates River, saying, "the largest and longest river of western Asia; rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains and flows into the Persian Gulf." Strong tells us that this name literally means, "fruitfulness." The Enhanced Strong says this Hebrew word is used 19 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "Euphrates 19." Gesenius says the Greek word ευφράτης (from אֶפְרָת) reveals how the name "Euphrates" is derived from the Hebrew word ( פְּרָת). He tells us that the name of this river denoted "sweet water," and that "the Euphrates is sweet and pleasant-tasting." He compares Jeremiah 2:18, in which the prophet accused Judah of preferring to drink of the waters of the Nile and of the Euphrates. This meant that they preferred to serve their gods rather than the God of Israel.

Jeremiah 2:18, "And now what hast thou to do in the way of Egypt, to drink the waters of Sihor? or what hast thou to do in the way of Assyria, to drink the waters of the river?"

Genesis 2:15 And the LORD God took the Prayer of Manasseh , and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it.

Genesis 2:15Comments - As Adam labored in the Garden of Eden, he gained immediately insight into God's divine law of sowing and reaping. Adam began to understand that his success at taking dominion upon the earth was dependent upon his sowing and reaping. God would later send the children of Israel into the Promised Land and command them to go in and possess the land ( Deuteronomy 1:8). Their possession and dominion of the Promised Land involved farming and raising livestock, which again taught them the principle of sowing and reaping.

Deuteronomy 1:8, "Behold, I have set the land before you: go in and possess the land which the LORD sware unto your fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to give unto them and to their seed after them."

Genesis 2:16 And the LORD God commanded the Prayer of Manasseh , saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat:

Genesis 2:16Comments- God's command was that He forbade Adam and Eve to eat of the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which brought death. The tree of life brought life. God also gave Abraham a command in Genesis 22to test him, to see if Abraham really believed God"s Word. The command in this verse was also a test of their love and faith in God.

God placed the tree of the knowledge of good and evil in the Garden of Eden so that man could use the free will that God placed within him to choose between good and evil, right and wrong. God did not want man to stumble, but rather He wanted man to be able to prove his love and devotion to him of his own choosing. There can be no true love to show the Father unless there is an ability to make a choice to love or to disobey.

Genesis 2:17 But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.

Genesis 2:17 — "for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die" - Comments- In Genesis 2:17 God told Adam that in the day that he eats of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil he would surely die. This warning did not mean that Adam would physically die within a 24-hour period after eating of this tree. He meant that Adam would die spiritually by cutting himself off from the life-flowing fellowship he had in the presence of Almighty God. When a being's spiritual life is cut off, its physical life will soon wither up and die, just the fig tree that Jesus cursed. Thus, physical death would come within a certain period of time. Therefore, this word for death primarily means separation from God, for Adam and Eve were driven from the presence of God on the same day that they sinned, but it results in physical death. The process of death began the minute Adam and Eve died. It took them almost one thousand years to die physically, but the process of death began the day then sinned.

The Book of Jubilees (429-31) interprets this phrase to mean that Adam would die within a thousand year period since "one thousand years are as one day in the testimony of the heavens". We find this phrase in 2 Peter 3:8, which says that one day is as a thousand years and a thousand years is as one day. Adam lived 930 years, just less than "a thousand year" day from God"s perspective. Song of Solomon , from God"s view, Adam died in the "day," or thousand-year period, that he ate of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Adam died that day both spiritually and physically.

2 Peter 3:8, "But, beloved, be not ignorant of this one thing, that one day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day."

Genesis 2:15-17Comments- God Teaches Man How To Sow and Reap- The first divine principle that God was to teach man was that of sowing and reaping; for God placed man in the Garden of Eden and commanded him to tend it and to keep it. As man learned this principle in the natural realm, he could then apply it to the spiritual realm and to every aspect of his life. It was this principle that would lead man into abundance and prosperity and into a deeper devotion to God. We see the best example of this when Jesus fed the multitude in John 6. When the people later followed Him across the Sea of Galilee, they were seeking material provisions. However, Jesus took the opportunity to teach them that He was the true bread of life. The lesson of being fed miraculously was intended to teach them to seek the Lord as their Provider. Jesus told them to labour for the meat that endures unto everlasting life. Jesus tried to explain that if they would sow by seeking Him, they would reap eternal life.

John 6:27, "Labour not for the meat which perisheth, but for that meat which endureth unto everlasting life, which the Son of man shall give unto you: for him hath God the Father sealed."

Another excellent example of the Lord teaching the principles of sowing and reaping and applying it to our spiritual lives is found in the Parable of the Sower. He taught His disciples that sowing the Word of God was like a man sowing seed in different types of soil. Each seed produced a harvest according to the soil that it was sown in.

Even during Israel's Exodus from Egypt and the Wilderness journey, God taught them to gather manna each morning. The lesson of this labour was to teach the children of Israel that man did not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God.

When God send the twelve spies into the land of Canaan to spy out the Promised Land, He tried to teach His children how to receive spiritually from Him by showing them a natural harvest of blessings that were produced by tilling and tending the ground. They returned with a cluster of grapes so large that they had to carry it on a pole between two men ( Numbers 13:23).

Numbers 13:23, "And they came unto the brook of Eshcol, and cut down from thence a branch with one cluster of grapes, and they bare it between two upon a staff; and they brought of the pomegranates, and of the figs."

Such a natural harvest from the earth should have taught them about God's abundant provision for those who would serve Him. Instead, as Adam and Eve, they chose to rebel and do what they wanted to do. During their times of trials in the wilderness, the children of Israel even looked back to their harvest of fruits and vegetables in Egypt and longed to return to those natural blessings ( Exodus 16:3, Numbers 11:4-6).

Exodus 16:3, "And the children of Israel said unto them, Would to God we had died by the hand of the LORD in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the flesh pots, and when we did eat bread to the full; for ye have brought us forth into this wilderness, to kill this whole assembly with hunger."

Numbers 11:4-6, "And the mixt multitude that was among them fell a lusting: and the children of Israel also wept again, and said, Who shall give us flesh to eat? We remember the fish, which we did eat in Egypt freely; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlick: But now our soul is dried away: there is nothing at all, beside this manna, before our eyes."

Those natural blessings had failed to teach them the spiritual principles of sowing and reaping.

With this lesson of sowing and reaping, God gave man a commandment not to touch one particular tree. He did this so that man could make a choice as to whether he would serve God or disobey Him. The tree of the knowledge of good and evil was planted in the garden to prove Prayer of Manasseh , to see whether he would serve God or not. It was a test of man's love and devotion to the living God. If man had not choice, then he might serve the Lord out of compulsion and not out of love, for God wants man to serve Him cheerfully and not grudgingly ( 2 Corinthians 9:7). This tree provided the test.

2 Corinthians 9:7, "Every man according as he purposeth in his heart, so let him give; not grudgingly, or of necessity: for God loveth a cheerful giver."

Today there are many things that God does not want us to touch. God used this principle many times in order to test man's love for the living God. Many people in Old Testament were cut off from Israel because of disobedience.

Illustrations:

1. God tested the children of Israel by telling them not to touch the spoils of Jericho:

Joshua 6:18, "And ye, in any wise keep yourselves from the accursed thing, lest ye make yourselves accursed, when ye take of the accursed thing, and make the camp of Israel a curse, and trouble it."

2. God left the Canaanites in the land of Israel to test their loyalty:

Judges 2:21-23, "I also will not henceforth drive out any from before them of the nations which Joshua left when he died: That through them I may prove Israel, whether they will keep the way of the LORD to walk therein, as their fathers did keep it, or not. Therefore the LORD left those nations, without driving them out hastily; neither delivered he them into the hand of Joshua."

Judges 3:1, "Now these are the nations which the LORD left, to prove Israel by them, even as many of Israel as had not known all the wars of Canaan;"

Judges 3:4, "And they were to prove Israel by them, to know whether they would hearken unto the commandments of the LORD, which he commanded their fathers by the hand of Moses."

3. God tested King Saul by telling him to utterly destroy the Amalekites. However, Saul disobeyed and saved the best of the spoil:

1 Samuel 15:22, "And Samuel said, Hath the LORD as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the LORD? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams."

Genesis 2:18 And the LORD God said, It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him an help meet for him.

Genesis 2:18Word Study on "help meet" - BDB says the Hebrew word "help meet" ( עֵזֶר) (H 5828) means, "help, succour, or one who helps." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 21times in the Old Testament being translated in the KJV as "help 19, help meet 2." Thus, the only two times that it is not translated "help" is in Genesis 1:18; Genesis 1:20. Strong says it comes from the primitive root ( עָזַר) (H 5828), which means, "to help, succour, support."

Genesis 2:18Comments- Man's Social Characteristics- We see in Genesis 2:18 that man is a social creature. He was created to have relationships with one another. The most important relationship for a person after his relationship with God is his relationship with his wife.

Genesis 2:18Comments- Woman was Not Originally in Submission to Prayer of Manasseh - It is important to note that God made man a helpmeet, or one who helps him and was equal to him. It was not until God cursed the woman that she was made subject to the man. From the beginning it was not so. Therefore, in heaven men and women will be back on equal levels of authority.

Genesis 2:19 And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them: and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.

Genesis 2:19Word Study on "Adam" - The Enhanced Strong says the Hebrew word "Adam" ( אָדָם) (H 120) is used 552times in the Old Testament, and it is translated " Prayer of Manasseh ," or "person" in all but 22occurrences, where it is translated "Adam." Most of these 22occurrences are in the first five chapters of Genesis. Its first appearance is found in Genesis 2:19. Strong says this word comes from the primitive root ( אָדֵם) (H 119), which means, "to be red, ruddy." Note in Genesis 5:2 that God Himself will give both man and woman the same name, "Adam," which means within that context, "human being or mankind," as opposed to the animal kingdom.

Genesis 5:2, "Male and female created he them; and blessed them, and called their name Adam, in the day when they were created." However, no one gave God his name "YHWH".

Genesis 2:19 — "And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them" - Comments- We can image God creating a particular animal from the earth and eagerly bringing it to Adam to see what he would name it. One by one, Adam received another beautiful creature from God until all of the animals were created. We may compare a similar event of parents giving a pet dog or cat to their children and letting the children name them. After all, the children would be the primary friend that spent the most time playing with the pet.

God may have brought the animals to Adam in the same way that He brought the animals to the Ark and the same way He brought a whale to swallow Jonah.

Genesis 2:19 "and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof" - Comments- God named man "Adam," and man gave the woman her name as well as the creatures of the earth. It becomes apparent that in naming someone or something, this person or creature comes under their dominion. Man was given dominion on the earth, so Adam"s charge to name God"s creation was limited to the earth. Adam took dominion over the plant kingdom by tilling the earth and tending the Garden of Eden ( Genesis 2:15), but he took dominion over the animal kingdom by naming these animals. However, God still retained dominion in the heavens, which is why God named the stars and the heavenly bodies and not man ( Psalm 147:4).

Psalm 147:4, "He telleth the number of the stars; he calleth them all by their names."

Adam was charged to take dominion over the animal kingdom by naming each one of them as he determined their respective roles in serving mankind. Thus, his first job was to begin to prophesy over animals, giving them name. He looked at the horse and said, "Your destiny is to serve to carry men." He looked at the ox and said, "Your ministry is to plow for mankind." He said to the eagle, "Your job is to teach men about soaring high above the cares of life." He looked at the dinosaur and said, "Your job is to declare the majesty of Almighty God." In other words, Adam identified the destiny and ministry of each animal and named it accordingly.

Genesis 2:20 And Adam gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field; but for Adam there was not found an help meet for him.

Genesis 2:20 — "And Adam gave names to all" - Comments- Just as Adam"s first job was to name all living things, a child"s first learning job is to learn the names of things and animals in picture books. The naming of all living things laid a foundation that mankind is still following today, in learning these names, and creating new things to name.

Genesis 2:19-20Comments- Adam Names the Animals - In Genesis 2:19-20 we have the account of Adam naming all of the animals of God's creation. Jewish tradition tells us that the event of Adam naming all of the animals took place during the first five days of the second week of Creation (The Book of Jubilees 214).

"And on the six days of the second week we brought, according to the word of God, unto Adam all the beasts, and all the cattle, and all the birds, and everything that moves on the earth, and everything that moves in the water, according to their kinds, and according to their types: the beasts on the first day; the cattle on the second day; the birds on the third day; and all that which moves on the earth on the fourth day; and that which moves in the water on the fifth day. And Adam named them all by their respective names, and as he called them, so was their name. And on these five days Adam saw all these, male and female, according to every kind that was on the earth, but he was alone and found no helpmeet for him." (The Book of Jubilees 214)

With each name that Adam gave the animals, he imparted to them their purpose and destiny; for they had been placed under his dominion ( Genesis 1:28-30). Thus, it was his office and ministry to name them and to decide their purpose in bringing man to prosperity. God named only the man and left all the rest to Adam because all had been made subject to him. God did name the stars in Heaven ( Psalm 147:4) because this had not been given to man: for man's dominion was limited to the earth.

It is possible that with the identification of each animal, God revealed to Adam much about each one so that Adam could properly name it; for each creature had a function and purpose in God's overall plan of creation. As Adam received a revelation from God in the form of a word of knowledge or a word of Wisdom of Solomon , he appropriately named each creature. In addition, with insight into each creature's characteristics and purpose in creation, there would have been revealed to Adam one aspect of God's divine nature; for we read in Romans 1:19-20, "Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse:" This verse tells us that the things God made reveal His divine attributes. Therefore, this exercise for Adam of naming the animals would have also been a way of getting to know God's divine nature.

Genesis 2:21 And the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept: and he took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof;

Genesis 2:22 And the rib, which the LORD God had taken from Prayer of Manasseh , made he a woman, and brought her unto the man.

Genesis 2:22Word Study on "he made" - BDB says the Hebrew verb "he made" ( בָּנָה) (H 1129) means, "to build, rebuild, establish, cause to continue." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 376 times in the Old Testament being translated in the KJV as "build 340, build up 14, builder 10, made 3, built again + 087352, repair 2, set up 2, have children + 087351, obtain children + 087351, surely 1 (inf. for emphasis)."

Genesis 2:22 — "made he a woman" - Comments- The woman was the last act in God"s creation. All other creatures were now created and given to man to name.

Genesis 2:23 And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.

Genesis 2:23 — "she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man" - Word Study on "woman" - BDB says the Hebrew word "woman" ( אִשָּׁה) (H 802) means, "woman, wife, female" depending upon the context. The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 780 times in the Old Testament being translated in the KJV as "wife 425, woman 324, one 10, married 5, female 2, misc 14."

Word Study on "man" - The Hebrew word "man" ( אִישׁ) (H 376) is the commonly used word for "man" in the Old Testament. BDB says it may also be translated "male, husband, human being, person or mankind." The Enhanced Strong says it used 1639 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as " Prayer of Manasseh 1002, men 210, one 188, husband 69, any 27, misc 143."

Comments- The Hebrew word for "woman" ( אִשָּׁה) is spelled in the form of a diminutive of "man" ( אִישׁ). In other words, it has the literally meaning of "little Prayer of Manasseh ," or even "in the image of man." In a similar derivative of words, Acts 11:26 says those who believed in Jesus Christ began to be called "Christians," or "little Christs," in the sense that these people behaved like Christ and so reminded them of Him.

Acts 11:26, "And when he had found him, he brought him unto Antioch. And it came to pass, that a whole year they assembled themselves with the church, and taught much people. And the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch."

The New Testament adds to our insight in Genesis 2:23 when it says that the woman was the glory of Prayer of Manasseh , or that she was made in the image or likeness man.

1 Corinthians 11:7, "For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, forasmuch as he is the image and glory of God: but the woman is the glory of the man."

Genesis 2:24 Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.

Genesis 2:24Word Study on "cleave" - BDB says the Hebrew word "cleave" ( דָּבַק) (H 1692) means, "to cling, stick, stay close, cleave, keep close, stick to, stick with, follow closely, join to, overtake, catch." It implies that a covenant has been instituted. It is a covenant between man and woman and also with God. The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 54times in the Old Testament being translated in the KJV as "cleave 32, follow hard 5, overtake 3, stick 3, keep fast 2, ...together 2, abide 1, close 1, joined 1, pursued 1, take 1."

Genesis 2:24Comments- Marriage is the cause for children to leave their parents. Oral and Evelyn Roberts were being interviewed by Benny Hinn on his television program on Trinity Broadcasting Network named "This Is Your Day." Oral Roberts read Genesis 2:24 as a key verse that God used in their marriage because it talks about them leaving their parent's house and clinging to one another. He said that the Lord spoke to him and said, "When I see you and Evelyn, I do not see you as two people, but as one person." 92]

92] Oral Roberts, interviewed by Benny Hinn, This is Your Day, on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California), television program.

Genesis 2:24Old Testament Quotes in the New Testament- Genesis 2:24 is quoted several places in the New Testament. This means that was a popular verse with the Jews.

Matthew 19:4-5, "And he answered and said unto them, Have ye not read, that he which made them at the beginning made them male and female, And said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they twain shall be one flesh?"

Mark 10:5-8, "And Jesus answered and said unto them, For the hardness of your heart he wrote you this precept. But from the beginning of the creation God made them male and female. For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and cleave to his wife; And they twain shall be one flesh: so then they are no more twain, but one flesh."

1 Corinthians 6:16, "What? know ye not that he which is joined to an harlot is one body? for two, saith Hebrews , shall be one flesh."

Ephesians 5:31, "For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh."

Genesis 2:25 And they were both naked, the man and his wife, and were not ashamed.

Genesis 2:25Comments - The fact that Adam and Eve were not ashamed of their nakedness means that they could clearly see one another's physical bodies. However, because they had never sinned, they felt no guilt, even in their nakedness. However, when they did sin, guilt penetrated every aspect of their lives, even how they saw themselves, so that they felt ashamed of their nakedness ( Genesis 3:7). Andrew Wommack says Adam and Eve originally walked by their spiritual senses; but after the Fall, they were led by their five physical senses because of their broken fellowship with God. 93]

93] Andrew Wommack, "Sermon," Andrew Wommack Bible Conference, Kampala, Uganda, 3June 2010.

Genesis 3:7, "And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons."


Verses 4-26

Ten Genealogies (Calling) - The Genealogies of Righteous Men and their Divine Callings (To Be Fruitful and Multiply) - The ten genealogies found within the book of Genesis are structured in a way that traces the seed of righteousness from Adam to Noah to Shem to Abraham to Isaac and to Jacob and the seventy souls that followed him down into Egypt. The book of Genesis closes with the story of the preservation of these seventy souls, leading us into the book of Exodus where we see the creation of the nation of Israel while in Egyptian bondage, which nation of righteousness God will use to be a witness to all nations on earth in His plan of redemption. Thus, we see how the book of Genesis concludes with the origin of the nation of Israel while its first eleven chapters reveal that the God of Israel is in fact that God of all nations and all creation.

The genealogies of the six righteous men in Genesis (Adam, Noah, Shem, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) are the emphasis in this first book of the Old Testament, with each of their narrative stories opening with a divine commission from God to these men, and closing with the fulfillment of prophetic words concerning the divine commissions. This structure suggests that the author of the book of Genesis wrote under the office of the prophet in that a prophecy is given and fulfilled within each of the genealogies of these six primary patriarchs. Furthermore, all the books of the Old Testament were written by men of God who moved in the office of the prophet, which includes the book of Genesis. We find a reference to the fulfillment of these divine commissions by the patriarchs in Hebrews 11:1-40. The underlying theme of the Holy Scriptures is God's plan of redemption for mankind. Thus, the book of Genesis places emphasis upon these men of righteousness because of the role that they play in this divine plan as they fulfilled their divine commissions. This explains why the genealogies of Ishmael ( Genesis 25:12-18) and of Esau ( Genesis 36:1-43) are relatively brief, because God does not discuss the destinies of these two men in the book of Genesis. These two men were not men of righteousness, for they missed their destinies because of sin. Ishmael persecuted Isaac and Esau sold his birthright. However, it helps us to understand that God has blessed Ishmael and Esau because of Abraham although the seed of the Messiah and our redemption does not pass through their lineage. Prophecies were given to Ishmael and Esau by their fathers, and their genealogies testify to the fulfillment of these prophecies. There were six righteous men did fulfill their destinies in order to preserve a righteous seed so that God could create a righteous nation from the fruit of their loins. Illustration - As a young schoolchild learning to read, I would check out biographies of famous men from the library, take them home and read them as a part of class assignments. The lives of these men stirred me up and placed a desire within me to accomplish something great for mankind as did these men. In like manner, the patriarchs of the genealogies in Genesis are designed to stir up our faith in God and encourage us to walk in their footsteps in obedience to God.

The first five genealogies in the book of Genesis bring redemptive history to the place of identifying seventy nations listed in the Table of Nations. The next five genealogies focus upon the origin of the nation of Israel and its patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

There is much more history and events that took place surrounding these individuals emphasized in the book of Genesis , which can be found in other ancient Jewish writings, such as The Book of Jubilees. However, the Holy Scriptures and the book of Genesis focus upon the particular events that shaped God's plan of redemption through the procreation of men of righteousness. Thus, it was unnecessary to include many of these historical events that were irrelevant to God's plan of redemption.

In addition, if we see that the ten genealogies contained within the book of Genesis show to us the seed of righteousness that God has preserved in order to fulfill His promise that the "seed of woman" would bruise the serpent's head in Genesis 3:15, then we must understand that each of these men of righteousness had a particular calling, destiny, and purpose for their lives. We can find within each of these genealogies the destiny of each of these men of God, for each one of them fulfilled their destiny. These individual destinies are mentioned at the beginning of each of their genealogies.

It is important for us to search these passages of Scripture and learn how each of these men fulfilled their destiny in order that we can better understand that God has a destiny and a purpose for each of His children as He continues to work out His divine plan of redemption among the children of men. This means that He has a destiny for you and me. Thus, these stories will show us how other men fulfilled their destinies and help us learn how to fulfill our destiny. The fact that there are ten callings in the book of Genesis , and since the number "10" represents the concept of countless, many, or numerous, we should understand that God calls out men in each subsequent generation until God's plan of redemption is complete.

We can even examine the meanings of each of their names in order to determine their destiny, which was determined for them from a child. Adam's name means "ruddy, i.e. a human being" (Strong), for it was his destiny to begin the human race. Noah's name means, "rest" (Strong). His destiny was to build the ark and save a remnant of mankind so that God could restore peace and rest to the fallen human race. God changed Abram's name to Abraham, meaning, "father of a multitude" (Strong), because his destiny was to live in the land of Canaan and believe God for a son of promise so that his seed would become fruitful and multiply and take dominion over the earth. Isaac's name means, "laughter" (Strong) because he was the child of promise. His destiny was to father two nations, believing that the elder would serve the younger. Isaac overcame the obstacles that hindered the possession of the land, such as barrenness and the threat of his enemies in order to father two nations, Israel and Esau. Jacob's name was changed to Israel, which means "he will rule as God" (Strong), because of his ability to prevail over his brother Esau and receive his father's blessings, and because he prevailed over the angel in order to preserve his posterity, which was the procreation of twelve sons who later multiplied into the twelve tribes of Israel. Thus, his ability to prevail against all odds and father twelve righteous seeds earned him his name as one who prevailed with God's plan of being fruitful and multiplying seeds of righteousness.

In order for God's plan to be fulfilled in each of the lives of these patriarchs, they were commanded to be fruitful and multiply. It was God's plan that the fruit of each man was to be a godly seed, a seed of righteousness. It was because of the Fall that unrighteous seed was produced. This ungodly offspring was not then nor is it today God's plan for mankind.

Outline - Here is a proposed outline:

1. The Generation of the Heavens and the Earth — Genesis 2:4 to Genesis 4:26

a) The Creation of Man — Genesis 2:4-25

b) The Fall — Genesis 3:1-24

c) Cain and Abel — Genesis 4:1-26

2. The Generation of Adam — Genesis 5:1 to Genesis 6:8

3. The Generation of Noah — Genesis 6:9 to Genesis 9:29

4. The Generation of the Sons of Noah — Genesis 10:1 to Genesis 11:9

5. The Generation of Shem — Genesis 11:10-26

6. The Generation of Terah (& Abraham) — Genesis 11:27 to Genesis 25:11

7. The Generation Ishmael — Genesis 25:12-18

8. The Generation of Isaac — Genesis 25:19 to Genesis 35:29

9. The Generation of Esau — Genesis 36:1-43

10. The Generation of Jacob — Genesis 37:1 to Genesis 50:26

 


Copyright Statement
These files are copyrighted by the author, Gary Everett. Used by Permission.
No distribution beyond personal use without permission.

Bibliography Information
Everett, Gary H. "Commentary on Genesis 2:4". Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ghe/genesis-2.html. 2013.

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