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Bible Commentaries

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

1 Chronicles 28

 

 

Verse 1

Israel. These are more particularly described as princes of the tribes, (Haydock) twelve captains, &c., chap. xxvii. 1. --- And his. Hebrew, "and of his sons." (Calmet) --- We may also understand this of the preceptors of the royal family, chap. xxvii. 32. --- Officers. Literally, "eunuchs." (Haydock) --- Bravest; particularly those specified [in] chap. xi.


Verse 2

Rising up from his bed, on which he lay, on account of his great age and weakness, while he addressed himself to his son; (3 Kings i. 47.; Calmet) or he rose from his throne, to honor this grand assembly. Hebrew, "stood upon his feet." (Haydock) --- Thought. Hebrew, "I, with my heart, thought to," &c. (Calmet) --- And, or which is the footstool. (Haydock) --- The ark is often so called, because God was considered as sitting upon the wings of the cherubim, over it, Psalm xcviii. 1., &c. --- Building. No doubt what David left would have been sufficient. Yet Solomon thought that he could make something still more magnificent.


Verse 3

Blood. See chap. xxii. 8. (Calmet)


Verse 4

Ever; for a long time, and to leave the throne to my posterity for many ages, and to the Messias for ever. This expression is not always to be taken in its rigour. (Calmet) --- Princes. Hebrew, "prince, or the ruler." (Haydock) --- This tribe had long possessed the greatest power, (Calmet) and the promise of the sceptre, Genesis xlix. (Worthington) --- The phrase often denotes a long time, but it is best understood of Christ. (Du Hamel)


Verse 5

My son, by the mouth of Nathan, 2 Kings vii. 13. (Menochius) --- Solomon was a figure of Christ, and his dignity was predicted, chap. xvii. 11., and 3 Kings i. 13. (Calmet)


Verse 7

If. The promises of the Old Testament were frequently conditional, and we always find the condition marked in some place; but those made to the Church of Christ, have no such limitation. (Haydock) --- Day. Solomon was once faithful, and afterwards fell; it is uncertain whether ever to rise again. Hence it appears that the true children of God may become wicked. (Worthington)


Verse 8

Seek. Wilful (Haydock) or supine ignorance will excuse no man. (Menochius)


Verse 9

Know, with affection (Haydock) and faith; and him alone must thou serve. (Du Hamel) --- Forsake him, and die impenitent. (Haydock)


Verse 11

Description, impressed by God on David's imagination; (Cajetan) or rather planned out by the hand of God, (ver. 19.; Salien) as the law was written. (Haydock) --- The Jews pretend that this plan was delivered to Moses, and handed down by Josue, &c., to David. (Estius) --- But why might not David receive it immediately from heaven? (Calmet) --- Treasures. Literally, "cellars." (Haydock) --- The original term, Ganzac, is not Hebrew. We find Ganas (Esther iii. 9.) to signify a treasure, being derived from the Persian, Gaza. David gave, therefore, a description of the rooms to keep the treasures of the temple, or of the cellars for wine and oil. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "a pattern of the temple and of the houses thereof, and of the Zakcho, and of the upper rooms, and of the inner storehouses," &c. (Haydock) --- Inner, or most retired closets, (3 Kings xx. 30.; Calmet) where the Levites slept. (Menochius) --- Seat, where the ark was kept, and God was rendered propitious. (Haydock)


Verse 13

Divisions, into twenty-four classes, (Menochius) which was done by God's order. (Haydock) --- For all, that everything might be done with regularity. (Menochius)


Verse 14

Weight, or sufficient for each, ver. 15. (Haydock) --- Some think he only left a memorial of what quantity of gold and silver would be requisite. It does not appear that Solomon used silver for the vessels, as he chose to execute his father's injunctions with still greater magnificence.


Verse 15

Silver. David probably intended that five candlesticks would be made of this metal: but Solomon made all the ten of gold, 3 Kings vii. 49. There was one in the tabernacle, Exodus xxv. 31. (Calmet) --- But the temple was more spacious, and a greater number was not prohibited. (Menochius) --- According. Hebrew, "for the use of every candlestick."


Verse 16

Silver. Yet all the ten were composed of the purest gold, (2 Paralipomenon iv. 12.) as silver was too common, ibid.[2 Paralipomenon] ix. 20. Moses had only two tables. (Calmet) --- Diversity. Hebrew, "for each table." (Vatable)


Verse 17

Lions. St. Jerome seems to have read cephir, instead of the present cephor, which is rendered "a cup, or bowl," 1 Esdras i. 10. (Calmet) --- Alexandrian Septuagint, "and of the flesh-hooks, libation vessels and bowls; and the weight of the golden and silver vessels (kepphoure; a word which they do not translate) of each weight." (Haydock) --- The change of i for u was very easy; and perhaps the basins were ornamented with representations of lions. (Du Hamel) (Menochius) --- We do not find cephor used before, to denote any of the vessels of the tabernacle: but Esdras uses it, (chap. viii. 27.) whence it is inferred that it is of Chaldean extraction.


Verse 18

Purest. Hebrew, "refined." --- Lord. He was represented as riding in a chariot, drawn by Cherubim, (Calmet) or sitting on their wings. (Haydock) --- Two, particularly, filled up the space between the walls in the most holy place, and covered the ark, and also the Cherubim made by Moses, 3 Kings vii. 23.


Verse 19

These things, said he, is not in Hebrew. Septuagint, "All in the handwriting of the Lord, did David give to Solomon, according to the knowledge given to him from above, respecting the workmanship of the pattern." (Haydock) --- David saw the pattern in a kind of ecstasy; (Salien; Estius) or some prophet delivered it unto him, (Calmet) marked out by the hand of an angel, (Tirinus) like the tabernacle given to Moses. (Du Hamel)


Verse 20

Lord. Septuagint add, "and I beheld, or behold, the pattern of the temple, and of the house and the Zakcho thereof, and the upper rooms and inner storehouses, and the house of propitiation, and the pattern of the house of the Lord: (21) and behold," ver. 11. (Haydock)


Verse 21

Thee. Hebrew and Septuagint, "for all workmanship, every willing skilful man for any service, also all the princes, and the people entirely at thy commands." (Haydock) --- The willing artificers are distinguished from those who were forced to work, though the former also received pay. (Calmet)


Verse 34

CHAPTER XXVIII.

 


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Bibliography Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Chronicles 28:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-chronicles-28.html. 1859.

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