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Bible Commentaries

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Ezekiel 42

 

 

Verse 1

Then he brought me forth into the utter court, the way toward the north: and he brought me into the chamber that was over against the separate place, and which was before the building toward the north.

No JFB commentary on this verse.


Verse 2

Before the length of an hundred cubits was the north door, and the breadth was fifty cubits. Before the length of an hundred cubits was the north door - i:e., before "the separate place," which was that length (Ezekiel 41:13). He had before spoken of chambers for the officiating priests on the north and south gates of the inner court (Ezekiel 40:44-46 ). He now returns to take a more exact view of them.


Verse 3-4

Over against the twenty cubits which were for the inner court, and over against the pavement which was for the utter court, was gallery against gallery in three stories.

No JFB commentary on these verses.


Verse 5

Now the upper chambers were shorter: for the galleries were higher than these, than the lower, and than the middlemost of the building.

The upper chambers were shorter - i:e., the building became narrower as it rose in height. The chambers were many: so "in my Father's house are many mansions" ( John 14:2); and besides these there was much "room" still left (cf. Luke 14:22 ). The chambers, though private, were near the temple. Prayer in our chambers is to prepare us for public devotions, and to help us in improving them.


Verses 6-15

For they were in three stories, but had not pillars as the pillars of the courts: therefore the building was straitened more than the lowest and the middlemost from the ground.

No JFB commentary on these verses.


Verse 16

He measured the east side with the measuring reed, five hundred reeds, with the measuring reed round about.

He measured the east side ... five hundred reeds. The Septuagint substitute 'cubits' for "reeds," to escape He measured the east side ... five hundred reeds. The Septuagint substitute 'cubits' for "reeds," to escape the immense compass assigned to the whole, namely, a square of 500 rods or 3,000 cubits (two feet each; Ezekiel 40:5, "a measuring reed of six cubits long") - in all, a square of one and one-seventh miles - i:e., more than all ancient Jerusalem; also, there is much space thus left unappropriated. Fairbairn rightly supports the English version, which agrees with the Hebrew. The vast extent is another feature marking the ideal character of the temple. It symbolizes the grit enlargement of the kingdom of God when Yahweh-Messiah shall reign at Jerusalem, and from thence to the ends of the earth (Isaiah 2:2-4; Jeremiah 3:17; Romans 11:12; Romans 11:15 ).


Verses 17-19

He measured the north side, five hundred reeds, with the measuring reed round about.

No JFB commentary on these verses.


Verse 20

He measured it by the four sides: it had a wall round about, five hundred reeds long, and five hundred broad, to make a separation between the sanctuary and the profane place.

It had a wall round about ... to make a separation between the sanctuary and the profane place. No longer shall the wall of partition be to separate the Jew and the Gentile (for Christ "hath broken, down the middle wall of partition between us" Gentiles and Jews, Ephesians 2:14 ), but, to separate the sacred from the profane. The lowness of it renders it unfit for the purpose of defense (the object of the wall of the holy city, Revelation 21:12). But its square form (as in the city, Revelation 21:16 ) is the emblem of the "kingdom that cannot be moved" (Hebrews 12:28), resting on prophets and apostles, Jesus Christ being the chief cornerstone.

Remarks:

(1) This chapter describes the chambers of the priests, and the dimensions of the holy mount whereon the temple is to stand. How far the details of the vast dimensions are literal (Ezekiel 42:16-20 ), and how far ideal, is as yet uncertain. Perhaps language is used in the description, the full significance of which is not to be exhausted even in the millennial temple, but shall find its full realization in the post-millennial city (Revelation 21:10-12, etc), which shall descend from God out of heaven on the regenerated earth, the new Jerusalem, which shall be all temple, and therefore shall have "no" part specially set apart as "temple" ( Revelation 21:22). In that consummated and final scene of glory there shall be a real city, of glorious proportions, but one of that heavenly nature which shall correspond to the heavenly earth, and the heavenly bodies of saints that shall tenant it. In the same way the language of Ezekiel concerning Gog and Magog receives only a partial fulfillment in the pre-millennial Antichrist, but receives its exhaustive realization in the post-millennial Gog, the last instrument of Satan which shall ever vex the saints (Revelation 20:7-10 ).

(2) Meanwhile on the millennial earth this vast temple symbolizes the mighty enlargement of the (2) Meanwhile, on the millennial earth, this vast temple symbolizes the mighty enlargement of the kingdoms of God when Christ shall reign, and the kingdoms of the earth shall be the kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ ( Revelation 11:15). "The mountain of the Lord's house," in that blessed day soon coming, shall be established in the top of the mountains, and all nations shall flow unto it" ( Isaiah 2:2 ). There shall still be the "separation between sanctuary and the profane place;" for even in the millennium there shall be things secular, as distinguished from things consecrated. Not until the new heaven and new earth (Revelation 21:1, etc; Revelation 22:1-21.) shall all things and persons alike be holy, and so no longer shall the distinction of sacred and profane exist.

(3) The chambers, though private, are to be near the temple ( Ezekiel 42:13 , etc), which teaches us that our communion with God in our secret chambers is to prepare us for public devotions in the sanctuary, and to enable us to derive all the benefits from them which God has design. There can be no real worship in public if them be not also worship in private. In the temple of the Holy Spirit, the Church, there are multitudes dwelling by faith, and yet "there is room" (Luke 14:22) for more. Let us see that our hearts can say, by blessed experience (Psalms 84:1), "How amiable are thy tabernacles, O Lord of hosts!" So shall we reach, and forever dwell in the heavenly house of our Father, wherein are many mansions (John 14:2).

 


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ezekiel 42:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ezekiel-42.html. 1871-8.

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