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Bible Commentaries

Sutcliffe's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments

Luke 21

 

 

Verses 1-38

Luke 21:5. Some spake of the temple, how it was adorned with goodly stones and gifts. This conversation occurred as they were going out of the temple. Mark 13:1. On mount Olivet the Lord delivered the luminous predictions which follow in the rest of the chapter. Matthew 24:3. Like the holy patriarchs, he died overflowing with the prophetic spirit.

Luke 21:15. I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay. Proof of this we have in the apostles before the council. Acts 5:29-32. In Stephen’s defence before the sanhedrim. Acts 7. In Paul’s defence before Felix, and before Agrippa. Acts 24:-26. These were great occasions, and made the confessors truly great. Their eloquence commanded admiration. It was the same with the apologetic writers, Justin Martyr, Tertullian, and Minutius Felix. Their arguments are conclusive, and their eloquence incomparable. The apologies for the christian religion of the two latter, are truly astonishing productions, and seem to participate of divine inspiration.

Luke 21:24. Until the times of the gentiles be fulfilled. Our Joseph Mede interprets this difficult text as importing that the Turks shall tread down Jerusalem for the time of its sentence; and that the true church of Christ, till then, shall be among the gentiles. I like this better than any gloss I have found.

Luke 21:34. Take heed to yourselves, lest at any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting and drunkenness; It is high time to awake out of sleep, to watch, and be ready. Here is the constant alarum of Christ. We know not how soon the watchman may sound his trumpet for war, for famine, or for the pestilence. How can christians dream of rest, in a world which crucified their Master.

Luke 21:35. As a snare shall it come on all them that dwell on the face of the whole ( γης) earth. It would seem from the whole of our Saviour’s predictions, that the word cannot be confined to Judea, but must be understood, in a succession of wars and troubles, to extend to the whole Roman empire. And are we in England prepared for the more tremendous visitations of providence? Have not calamities burst upon nations like thunder-storms, on the finest days of national prosperity? The Saviour exhorts us to pray that we may escape those disasters, and stand before the Son of man with joy at his appearing. So be it. Amen. — For Reflections see Matthew 24.

 


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Bibliography Information
Sutcliffe, Joseph. "Commentary on Luke 21:4". Sutcliffe's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jsc/luke-21.html. 1835.

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