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Bible Commentaries

Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible

2 Samuel 12

 

 

Verses 1-31

2 Samuel 12. David's Repentance. Capture of Rabbah (J).—The section concerning Nathan (2 Samuel 12:1-15 a) is sometimes regarded as a later addition by some one who was anxious to point out and emphasize the moral; but this view is not generally held. Only 2 Samuel 12:10-12 need be regarded as editorial. The chapter is important because it shows that the primitive ideas as to the morality of Yahweh were very real, though they might be defective in some directions.

2 Samuel 12:1-14. Nathan, by parable and admonition, brings David's guilt home to him; he makes penitent confession. Yahweh puts away his sin, which is thought of as a kind of disease, which would of itself kill the sinner, if it were not taken away.

2 Samuel 12:15-25. David's child by Bath-sheba dies, but another son, Solomon, is born to them.

2 Samuel 12:25. for the Lord's sake: an addition.

2 Samuel 12:26-31. Joab having made sure of the capture of Rabbah by making himself master of the water supply. (read, "city of waters" for "royal city" in 2 Samuel 12:26 as in 2 Samuel 12:27), David takes the command that he may have the formal credit. Amongst other spoil, he took the crown from the idol of Milcom, the god of Ammon; in this crown was a jewel which was set on David's head, probably in his crown or diadem; so with 1 Chronicles 20:2. He made his captives industrial slaves (mg.). Ch., however, makes him cut them with saws, etc.

 


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Bibliography Information
Peake, Arthur. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 12:4". "Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pfc/2-samuel-12.html. 1919.

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