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Bible Commentaries

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

1 Timothy Overview

 

 


The Preacher's Complete Homiletic

COMMENTARY

ON THE EPISTLES OF ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE

I-II Timothy, Titus, Philemon

By the REV. GEORGE BARLOW

Author of the Commentaries on Kings, Psalms (121-130), Lamentations, Ezekiel, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, I and II Thessalonians

ON THE EPISTLE TO THE

Hebrews

AND THE GENERAL EPISTLE OF

James

By the REV. ROBERT TUCK, B.A.

Author of the Commentaries on I and II Peter, I, II, and III John, Jude, and Revelation

New York

FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY

LONDON AND TORONTO

1892

THE PREACHER'S COMPLETE HOMILETIC

COMMENTARY

ON THE BOOKS OF THE BIBLE

WITH CRITICAL AND EXPLANATORY NOTES, INDEXES, ETC., BY VARIOUS AUTHORS

THE

PREACHER'S HOMILETICAL COMMENTARY

HOMILIES FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS

Church Seasons: Lent, Heb ; Heb 6:12; Heb 12:1; Heb 11:29; Jas 1:12-15; Jas 4:6. Good Friday, Heb 2:10; Heb 4:14-16; Heb 9:22; Heb 9:28; Heb 10:10. Whit Sunday, Heb 3:7.

Holy Communion: Heb ; Heb 13:15.

Missions to Heathen: 1Ti . Bible Society, 2Ti 3:14-17; Heb 4:12-13; Heb 5:12.

Evangelistic Services: 1Ti ; 1Ti 1:15; 1Ti 2:4; 1Ti 4:10; Tit 3:2-7. Heb 2:1-4; Heb 7:23-28.

Special: Ordination, 1Ti ; 1Ti 3:1-13; 1Ti 4:13-16; 1Ti 5:17-22; 2Ti 2:23-26; 2Ti 4:1-8; 2Ti 4:6-8; Tit 1:5-9; Tit 2:1; Tit 3:9; Tit 3:15; Heb 5:1-10; Heb 10:24. Workers, 1Ti 1:18-20; 1Ti 3:8-13; 1Ti 4:6-7; 2Ti 3:10-13; Tit 1:6; Heb 3:14; Heb 10:24; Jas 1:27; Jas 5:19-20. Harvest, Jas 5:7-11. Young, Tit 2:4-8. Parents, 1Ti 5:4; 1Ti 5:8; 1Ti 5:16; Heb 12:16. Aged, Tit 2:1-3; Phm 1:9. Young Men. 1Ti 4:8-11; Heb 12:7. Soldiers, 2Ti 2:3-4; Jas 4:1-2. Scientific men. 1Ti 6:20-21; Heb 11:1-3; Jas 4:17; Jas 5:17-18. Purity, Tit 1:15. Worship, 1Ti 2:1-3; Heb 10:25. Death. 2Ti 1:8; 2Ti 1:10; Heb 11:5-6; Heb 13:7; Heb 13:14; Jas 4:14.

THE FIRST EPISTLE TO

TIMOTHY

INTRODUCTION

Timothy was the son of a Christian Jewess named Eunice and a Greek whose name is unknown. Though nothing can be said definitely as to the place of his birth, Act would seem to indicate that it was Lystra or some place in the immediate neighbourhood. There St. Paul first made his acquaintance, when he was already a disciple. Paul, after circumcising him by way of expedient, adopted him as his fellow-worker. They journeyed together through Asia Minor to Philippi. At Berœa we find them together again. Thence he followed St. Paul to Athens, and was sent on to Thessalonica; and having fulfilled his mission there, returned to St. Paul at Corinth. He was with the apostle during his residence in Ephesus, and also when the epistles to the Corinthians and Romans were written. When St. Paul was a prisoner at Rome, Timothy was still with him. The apostle's high regard for his junior is evident in many ways. Though of frail health, he was the true child of an indomitable father in the gospel who had "no other like-minded."

Date and circumstances of writing the epistle.—Considering (a) the close resemblances of the Pastorals, it seems incredible that they are separated by any long intervals of time. (b) The almost insuperable difficulties of fitting them into the period covered by the Acts of the Apostles. (c) The even greater difficulty of harmonising their notes of time and place with those mentioned by St. Luke. Add to these (d) the peculiar and developed character of the false teachers and teaching alluded to in these epistles, and (e) the advanced Church organisation which they specify—and from all this it would seem impossible to refuse the ancient tradition that St. Paul was twice imprisoned at Rome, or to refuse the simple reasonable and highly natural opinion that the Pastorals are to be assigned to the period between these two imprisonments, about A.D. 66 or 67 (Ellicott).

Contents of the first epistle.—The epistle passes from subject to subject with all the ease and familiarity of a private communication written by an old man to a favourite disciple (Farrar).

1Ti . Greeting.

1Ti . Warning against theosophic Judaism.

1Ti . Sphere of the law, and thanksgiving for grace.

1Ti . Personal relations to that grace of Paul, Timothy, and men like Hymenus.

1Ti . Prayers enjoined for authorities.

1Ti . Universality of God's gracious purpose.

1Ti . Public prayers of men and women.

1Ti . The ideal overseer of the Church.

1Ti . Qualifications of deacons and deaconesses.

1Ti . Personal message to Timothy and a rhythmic confession.

1Ti . Timothy's attitude to the current speculations.

1Ti . His attitude to his elders, to widows, especially the younger ones.

1Ti . Treatment of the presbyters.

1Ti . Treatment of offenders.

1Ti . Personal directions—the different kinds of sin.

1Ti . Relationship of slaves to believing masters.

1Ti . Insolence and avarice of the heterodox teachers.

1Ti . Solemn command to Timothy (a) concerning himself.

1Ti . (b) Concerning the well-to-do.

1Ti . Final cautions against pernicious error.

 


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Bibliography Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on 1 Timothy:4 Overview". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/1-timothy-0.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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