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Bible Commentaries

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Job 13

 

 

Verse 1

CONTENTS

Job prosecutes the subject of his expostulation with his friends through the greater part of this chapter. He leaves discoursing with them, for a short space, and makes an earnest application to God.


Verses 1-17

(1) ¶ Lo, mine eye hath seen all this, mine ear hath heard and understood it. (2) What ye know, the same do I know also: I am not inferior unto you. (3) Surely I would speak to the Almighty, and I desire to reason with God. (4) But ye are forgers of lies, ye are all physicians of no value. (5) O that ye would altogether hold your peace! and it should be your wisdom. (6) Hear now my reasoning, and hearken to the pleadings of my lips. (7) Will ye speak wickedly for God? and talk deceitfully for him? (8) Will ye accept his person? will ye contend for God? (9) Is it good that he should search you out? or as one man mocketh another, do ye so mock him? (10) He will surely reprove you, if ye do secretly accept persons. (11) Shall not his excellency make you afraid? and his dread fall upon you? (12) Your remembrances are like unto ashes, your bodies to bodies of clay. (13) ¶ Hold your peace, let me alone, that I may speak, and let come on me what will. (14) Wherefore do I take my flesh in my teeth, and put my life in mine hand? (15) Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him: but I will maintain mine own ways before him. (16) He also shall be my salvation: for an hypocrite shall not come before him. (17) Hear diligently my speech, and my declaration with your ears.

In addition to the arguments Job had used before, he riseth up to another point of reasoning in those verses, and plainly tells his friends, that while they vainly supposed they were taking the part of GOD against him, they were really making the cause of GOD to suffer by their false counsel: for in so doing, and putting it down as a matter of fact, that afflictions were sure marks of displeasure, they were speaking wickedly for GOD. Hence, Job calls them, physicians of no value; and he should consider it their wisdom if the consciousness of this would make them hold their peace. Reader! let us by the way, make the same observation of all false reasoning to minds distressed; when men point not to that which can alone heal. A broken heart none can heal but JESUS: and whatever men direct to short of his blood and righteousness, are literally, like Job's counselors, physicians of no value.


Verse 18-19

(18) Behold now, I have ordered my cause; I know that I shall be justified. (19) Who is he that will plead with me? for now, if I hold my tongue, I shall give up the ghost.

One might have thought, had we not known otherwise, that Job had read Paul's challenge, Romans 8:33. or that he had humbly borrowed those sweet words which the prophet useth in reference, as we may suppose, to the person of Jesus. Isaiah 50:7-8. But, indeed, what Job had said before, that though GOD should slay him, yet would he trust in him, carries with it so noble an act of the most lively faith, as nothing but an eye to the righteousness of a Redeemer could produce. And that Job had those views, a subsequent part of his discourse with his friends very plainly, and very fully proves Job 19:25-26.


Verse 28

REFLECTIONS

READER! let you and I pause over this view of Job's confidence, and ask our own hearts whether, in our approaches now in ordinances, and looking forward to our appearance shortly before the judgment seat, when we shall stand before the throne, we have this well grounded assurance of acceptance in JESUS.

It is a grand question, and of all others the most important to be rightly known. Some are for postponing this enquiry, as if it could not be fully known until the last day. But let those who know not the scripture, neither the power of GOD, be content so to defer it. Let you and I see whether the knowledge is not attainable now, and under the conviction that it is, bring the blessed effects of it into present possession and enjoyment, that we may be the patient followers of them who now, through faith and patience, inherit the promises.

The LORD hath said he will be sanctified by all them that draw nigh unto him. Hence, when the HOLY GHOST is about to convince a sinner of sin, he sets up a tribunal in his very heart, and the work of grace begins in making the poor sinner to know and feel a sensibleness of his own lost and utterly undone estate, as it stands before GOD. Thus breaking up the fallow ground of the heart for the seed of righteousness, the HOLY GHOST next brings the convinced sinner acquainted with the person and work of the LORD JESUS CHRIST: and so powerfully convinceth him of the suitableness and all-sufficiency of JESUS for salvation, as to incline the sinner's whole soul to the belief, and to the cordial and hearty acceptance of redemption in this blessed way of GOD'S own appointing. And when these blessed works are wrought in the poor sinner's soul, like Job, he hastens to plead the whole before the throne. Reader! is this your privilege, your happiness, your confidence? If so, these precious things speaks for themselves. It is by these things, men live, and in this is the life of the soul. Oh! for grace thus to bring the LORD JESUS, and his finished work, in the arms of our faith in all our approaches to a mercy-seat in ordinances here below, in prayer, in communion, and in all our intercourse with GOD, while this side Jordan; and when we pass the river of death, this will be our sure and safe pleading against all the accusations of Satan, the fears of our own conscience, the terrors of GOD'S broken law, and the just judgments of Almighty GOD. Yes! blessed JESUS, I will now and forever say, Thou hast answered, and thou wilt answer for me, O LORD, my GOD!

 


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Bibliography Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 13:4". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-13.html. 1828.

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