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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Corinthians 3:8

 

 

Now he who plants and he who waters are one; but each will receive his own reward according to his own labor.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He that planteth and he that watereth are one - Both Paul and Apollos have received the same doctrine, preach the same doctrine, and labor to promote the glory of God in the salvation of your souls. Why should you be divided with respect to Paul and Apollos, while these apostles are intimately One in spirit, design, and operation?

According to his own labor - God does not reward his servants according to the success of their labor, because that depends on himself; but he rewards them according to the quantum of faithful labor which they bestow on his work. In this sense none can say, I have labored in vain, and spent my strength for nought.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-corinthians-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Are one - ἕν εἰσιν hen eisinThey are not the same person; but they are one in the following respects:

(1) They are united in reference to the same work. Though they are engaged in different things - for planting and watering are different kinds of work, yet it is one in regard to the end to be gained. The employments do not at all clash, but tend to the same end. It is not as if one planted, and the other was engaged in pulling up.

(2) their work is one, because one is as necessary as the other. If the grain was not planted there would be no use in pouring water there; if not watered, there would be no use in planting. The work of one is as necessary, therefore, as the other; and the one should not undervalue the labors of the other.

(3) they are one in regard to God. They are both engaged in performing one work; God is performing another. There are not three parties or portions of the work, but two. They two perform one part of the work; God alone performs the other. Theirs would be useless without him; he would not ordinarily perform his without their performing their part. They could not do his part it they would - as they cannot make a plant grow; he could perform their part - as he could plant and water without the farmer; but it is not in accordance with his arrangements to do it.

And every man - The argument of the apostle here has reference only to ministers; but it is equally true of all people, that they shall receive their proper reward.

Shall receive - On the Day of Judgment, when God decides the destiny of men. The decisions of that Day will be simply determining what every moral agent ought to receive.

His own reward - His fit, or proper ( τον ἴδιον ton idion) reward; that which pertains to him, or which shall be a proper expression of the character and value of his labor - The word “reward” μισθὸν misthondenotes properly that which is given by contract for service rendered; an equivalent in value for services or for kindness; see the note at Romans 4:4. In the Scriptures it denotes pay, wages, recompense given to day-laborers, to soldiers, etc. It is applied often, as here, to the retribution which God will make to people on the Day of Judgment; and is applied to the “favors” which he will then bestow on them, or to the “punishment” which he will inflict as the reward of their deeds. Instances of the former sense occur in Matthew 5:12; 6; Luke 6:23, Luke 6:35; Revelation 11:18; of the latter in 2 Peter 2:13, 2 Peter 2:15 - In regard to the righteous, it does not imply merit, or that they deserve heaven; but it means that, God will render to them that which, according to the terms of his new covenant, he has promised, and which shall be a fit expression of his acceptance of their services. It is proper, according to these arrangements, that they should be blessed in heaven. It would not be proper that they should be cast down to hell - Their original and their sole title to eternal life is the grace of God through Jesus Christ: the “measure,” or “amount” of the favors bestowed on them there, shall be according to the services which they render on earth. A parent may resolve to divide his estate among his sons, and their title to any thing may be derived from his mere favor but he may determine that it shall be divided according to their expressions of attachment, and to their obedience to him.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-corinthians-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Now he that planteth, and he that watereth are one,.... Not in every respect so; they were different as men, they were not the same individual persons, nor in the same office; Paul was an apostle, Apollos only a preacher of the Gospel; nor had they the same measure of gifts, nor did they labour alike, or were of the same usefulness; but they had one and the same commission to preach the Gospel; and the Gospel they preached was the same; and so were their views, aims, and ends, which were the glory of God, and the good of immortal souls; and they had the same love and affection for one another; they were one in their work, judgment, and affection; and which carries in it a strong reason and argument why the members of this church should not contend and divide about them:

and every man shall receive his own reward; either from men, that double honour he is worthy of, maintenance and respect; or rather from God, not a reward of debt, for his labours are by no means meritorious of anything at the hands of God, from whom he has all the grace, strength, and abilities he labours with; but of grace, even the reward of the inheritance, because he serves the Lord Christ; which is by bequest, through the death of the testator, and common to all the children of God, and heirs of glory:

according to his own labour; and not another's; and not according to the success of it, but according to that itself; not that that is the measure of the reward, for the reward infinitely exceeds it; but is that to which God has graciously annexed the promise of the reward, as an encouragement to it.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-corinthians-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

one — essentially in their aim they are one, engaged in one and the same ministry; therefore they ought not to be made by you the occasion of forming separate parties.

and every man — rather “but every man.” Though in their service or ministry, they are essentially “one,” yet every minister is separately responsible in “his own” work, and “shall receive his own (emphatically repeated) reward, according to his own labor.” The reward is something over and above personal salvation (1 Corinthians 3:14, 1 Corinthians 3:15; 2 John 1:8). He shall be rewarded according to, not his success or the amount of work done, but “according to his own labor.” It shall be said to him, “Well done, thou good and (not successful, but) faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord” (Matthew 25:23).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-corinthians-3.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Are one (εν εισινhen eisin). The neuter singular again (ενhen not ειςheis) as with the interrogative τιti and the indefinite τιti By this bold metaphor which Paul expands he shows how the planter and the waterer work together. If no one planted, the watering would be useless. If no one watered, the planting would come to naught as the dreadful drouth of 1930 testifies while these words are written.

According to his own labour (κατα τον ιδιον κοπονkata ton idion kopon). God will bestow to each the reward that his labour deserves. That is the pay that the preacher is sure to receive. He may get too little or too much here from men. But the due reward from God is certain and it will be adequate however ungrateful men may be.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/1-corinthians-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour.

But he that planteth and he that watereth are one — Which is another argument against division. Though their labours are different. they are all employed in one general work, - the saving souls. Hence he takes occasion to speak of the reward of them that labour faithfully, and the awful account to be given by all. Every man shall receive his own peculiar reward according to his own peculiar labour - Not according to his success; but he who labours much, though with small success, shall have a great reward. Has not all this reasoning the same force still? The ministers are still surely instruments in God's hand, and depend as entirely as ever on his blessing, to give the increase to their labours. Without this, they are nothing: with it, their part is so small, that they hardly deserve to be mentioned. May their hearts and hands be more united; and, retaining a due sense of the honour God doeth them in employing them, may they faithfully labour, not as for themselves, but for the great Proprietor of all, till the day come when he will reward them in full proportion to their fidelity and diligence!


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-corinthians-3.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Are one; they have one end and aim.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/1-corinthians-3.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8.He that planteth, and he that watereth are one He shows farther, from another consideration, that the Corinthians are greatly to blame in abusing, with a view to maintain their own sects and parties, the names of their teachers, who in the meantime are, with united efforts, aiming at one and the same thing, and can by no means be separated, or torn asunder, without at the same time leaving off the duties of their office. They are one, says he; in other words, they are so linked together, that their connection does not allow of any separation, because all ought to have one end in view, and they serve one Lord, and are engaged in the same work. Hence, if they employ themselves faithfully in cultivating the Lord’s field, they will maintain unity; and, by mutual communication, will help each other — so far from their names serving as standards to stir up contendings. Here we have a beautiful passage for exhorting ministers to concord. Meanwhile, however, he indirectly reproves those ambitious teachers, who, by giving occasion for contentions, discovered thereby that they were not the servants of Christ, but the slaves of vain-glory — that they did not employ themselves in planting and watering, but in rooting up and burning.

Every man will receive his own reward Here he shows what is the end that all ministers should have in view — not to catch the applause of the multitude, but to please the Lord. This, too, he does with the view of calling to the judgment-seat of God those ambitious teachers, who were intoxicated with the glory of the world, and thought of nothing else; and at the same time admonishing the Corinthians, as to the worthlessness of that empty applause which is drawn forth by elegance of expression and vain ostentation. He at the same time discovers in these words the fearlessness of his conscience, inasmuch as he ventures to look forward to the judgment of God without dismay. For the reason why ambitious men recommend themselves to the esteem of the world is, that they have not learned to devote themselves to God, and that they do not set before their eyes Christ’s heavenly kingdom. Accordingly, as soon as God comes to be seen, that foolish desire of gaining man’s favor disappears.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/1-corinthians-3.html. 1840-57.

Vv. 8. "Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one, but every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour."

The δέ is here a particle of transition, but with a shade of contrast: "Now, despite this difference of functions (pointed out, 1 Corinthians 3:5-7), these ministers are one." This unity is not that of their common nothingness (Bengel: "Neuter aeque quidquam est"), nor that of the part of simple servants (de Wette, Meyer, Heinrici, etc.); it is that of the work on which they labour together. To understand what Paul means by this unity, it is enough to consider the foregoing figures (1 Corinthians 3:6-7). Between two gardeners, one of whom plants and the other waters one and the same garden, who would think of setting up any rivalry? Would not the labour of the one become useless without that of the other? What folly, then, to disparage the one and exalt the other!

But yet there will one day be—the second δέ is adversative—a difference established between them: the difference of the reward they will receive, which will depend on the degree of their fidelity in their respective labours. This idea, expressed in the second part of the verse, is that which Paul proceeds to develop in the passage, 1 Corinthians 3:10-15. Of course it is the Master who will pass this estimate; it will take place at the day of judgment. And so what folly it is to anticipate it by comparisons made beforehand! The terms ἴδιος μισθός, his own reward, and ἴδιος κόπος, his own labour, recall the saying, Galatians 6:5 : "Every man will bear his own burden." The estimate of the fidelity of each servant will not rest on the comparison of it with another"s, but on the labour of each compared with his own task and his own gift. Now who else than God could pronounce such a sentence? And not only has He alone the power, but He alone has the right. This is what is brought out in 1 Corinthians 3:9.


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Bibliography
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/1-corinthians-3.html.

Scofield's Reference Notes

one

Paul refutes the notion that he and Cephas and Apollos are at variance, mere theologians and rival founders of sects: they are "one." 1 Corinthians 3:22; 1 Corinthians 16:12.

reward, 1 Corinthians 9:17; Daniel 12:3; 1 Corinthians 3:14


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Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/1-corinthians-3.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

8 Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour.

Ver. 8. And he that watereth are one] Why then are not you at one? Should ye not follow your leaders, press their footsteps? Surely you would, did you not more mind party than peace. Maxima pars studiorum, est studium partium; a hateful kind of study.

Shall receive his own reward] Those ambitious doctors that draw disciples after them, hunting after popular applause (that empty blast of stinking breath), shall have that for their reward; let them make them merry with it. When faithful ministers shall shine as stars, Daniel 12:3.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-corinthians-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Corinthians 3:8. Are one This is another cogent argument against division,—that though their labours were different, and their rewards proportionable, yet they had in the general one office, and were employed as workers-together by God, to plant the seeds of grace and holiness in the souls of men, and to bring them to perfection. St. Paul here introduces an excellent discourse of the happy consequences of faithfulness in the ministerial work, and the aweful account of it to be given up to God:—a subject familiar to his own mind; and so proper for their teachers, that if it render the epistle something less regular, it balances the account, by rendering it so much more useful. See Craddock's Apostol. Hist. p. 156.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-corinthians-3.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

He that planteth and he that watereth are one: that is, in their design and scope, in the aim and end of their ministry; therefore they should not be factiously divided, either among themselves or by their hearers. Although there is a variety and diversity in the gifts of Christ's ministers, yet the intent and design of their ministry being one, they all ought to agree as one. They should be one in doctrine, and one in affection; aiming at one and the same mark, namely, the glory of God, and men's salvation, as they are one in their office, institution, and end.

It follows, Every man shall receive his own reward, according to his own labour.

Thence learn, That every man, especially every minister, is sure to receive a proportionable reward hereafter, according to his labour and working for God here.

Learn, 2. The approbation and distinction of this reward; He shall receive his own reward: implying that there are degrees of reward and glory in heaven, according as men have laboured more or less for God here on earth: according to this gradual diversity, shall be gradual degrees of reward and glory in heaven, according as men have laboured more or less for God here on earth: according to this gradual diversity, shall be gradual degrees of glory.

Learn, 3. The measure and rule of this reward: according to the fruit of his ministry. If he labours faithfully, God will reward him proportionably, though few or none have believed his report.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/1-corinthians-3.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

8.] ἕν, in the nature of their ministry,—generically, κατὰ τὴν ὑπουργίαν· ἀμφότεραι γὰρ τῷ θείῳ διακονοῦσι βουλήματι. Theodoret.

ἕκαστος δὲ] Here he introduces a new element—the separate responsibility of each minister for the results of his own labour, so that, though κατὰ τὴν ὑπουργίαν they are one,— κατὰ τὸ ἔργον (ib.) they are diverse. The stress is twice on ἴδιον.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/1-corinthians-3.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

1 Corinthians 3:8. ἓν) one; neither of them is so much as anything. As one star in the heavens shines high above another; but the unscientific man does not perceive the difference in the height; so the Apostle Paul shone far above Apollos; but the Corinthians did not understand this, and Paul in this passage does not instruct them much on that point; he merely asserts the eminent superiority of Christ.— ἴδιονἴδιον, his own—his own) an appropriate repetition, and an antithesis to one.— μισθὸν, reward) something beyond salvation, 1 Corinthians 3:14-15. The faithful steward will receive praise, the diligent workman a reward.— κόπον, labour) not merely according to the work [done, but according to each man’s labour].


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/1-corinthians-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The ministers of Christ, though one be used in planting and another in watering, one in laying the foundation and another in building thereupon, yet are one; one in their office and work, one in their ministry, being all servants to Christ, who is one; all serving one and the same Lord, all doing the same business, proposing the same end, and with all their might labouring towards it; and therefore, as they ought not to divide into parties and factions, so you ought not for their sakes to be so divided. Yet they are not so one, but that one may labour more than another, and be honoured by God with more success than another, and every one shall receive a reward proportioned to his labour: the apostle saith not, according to the success of his labour, (that is not in his power), but,

according to his labour.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-corinthians-3.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Are one; they are engaged in one work, and for the promotion of one end, the glory of God, in the salvation of men. It is not proper, then, that they should be set up as the heads of different parties.

Shall receive; from Christ, not from man.

His own reward according to his own labor; the common Master of all will apportion to each his just reward, so that invidious comparisons between the different servants of Christ on the part of their fellow-Christians are entirely out of place. Ministers of Christ who are engaged in his work, are not laboring to attach men to themselves or to any human leader, but to Jesus Christ. They are all equally his servants, doing his work. And though their labor may be as needful to the salvation of men as is that of husbandmen in order to a harvest, yet their success is from God, and to him belongs the glory.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Family Bible New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/1-corinthians-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

8. ὁ φυτεύων δὲ καὶ ὁ ποτίζων ἕν εἰσιν. As though to make his depreciation of man as emphatic as possible, the Apostle uses the neuter gender here. The instruments are one thing, parts of a vast piece of machinery which God has put in motion for the salvation of the world. As channels of Divine grace it is our duty to forget their personality.

μισθὸν λήμψεται. The great truth contained in the first part of the verse is, however, capable of being misinterpreted. In reference to the work God’s ministers are but one. But in reference to their own individual action they are distinct. ‘Every man shall receive according as his work shall be.’ Else were God unjust.


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"Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/1-corinthians-3.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8. Are one—And so should not be divided between contending parties.

Every man—That truly either plants or waters God’s heritage.

According to his own laborer—As is fully shown in 1 Corinthians 3:12-15.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-corinthians-3.html. 1874-1909.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

8. And he that planteth and he that watereth are one, but each one shall receive his own reward according to his own labor.” What a disposition do we find to honor the revivalist who has been instrumental in the conversion of many, and lose sight of his faithful successors who came on and irrigated the crop, without which it certainly would have died. Lord, save us from worshipping men! We must remember that God Himself is the only efficient worker, and that He uses an infinite diversity of human instrumentality.


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Godbey, William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/1-corinthians-3.html.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

1 Corinthians 3:8. Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one—Gr. ‘one thing,’ co-operating to one end.

but each shall receive his own reward according to his own work. While the work is one, in one field, to one Master, on one principle, and to one end, each has his own sphere in it, his own gifts for it, his own success in it, his own reward for it. O how ought this to cheer the faithful labourer, who may be but moderately gifted, may be placed in a remote and uninviting part of the field, may have to fight with many obstacles and sore discouragements, and may live to see but little fruit of his best labour! (See John 4:36-38.)


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/1-corinthians-3.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

1 Corinthians 3:8. In comparison with God, Ap. and P. are simply nothing (1 Corinthians 3:7): in relation to each other they are not rivals, as their Cor(516) favourers would make them (1 Corinthians 3:4): “But the planter and the waterer are one” ( ἕν, one thing)—with one interest and aim, viz., the growth of the Church; cf. 1 Corinthians 12:12; 1 Corinthians 12:20; also John 10:30. Their functions are complementary, not competitive: a further answer to the question, τί οὖν ἐστὶν ἀπολλώς κ. τ. λ.; The servants of God are nothing before Him, “one thing” before His Church: vanity and variance are alike impossible.

While one in aim, they are distinct in responsibility and reward: “But each will get his own (proper) wage, according to his own toil”.— ἴδιος, appropriate, specific (cf. 1 Corinthians 7:7, 1 Corinthians 15:23; 1 Corinthians 15:28): “congruens iteratio, antitheton ad unum” (Bg(517)).— ἔργον (1 Corinthians 3:13-15) denotes the work achieved, κόπος the exertion put forth (see parls., and κοπιάω, 1 Corinthians 15:10, etc.): τί γὰρ εἰ ἔργον οὐκ ἐτέλεσεν;— ἐκοπίασεν δέ (Thp(518)). The contrast ἕν εἰσινἕκαστος δέ, between collective and individual relationships, is characteristic of Paul: cf. 1 Corinthians 12:5-11; 1 Corinthians 12:27, 1 Corinthians 15:10 f., Galatians 6:2-5, Romans 14:7-10. He forbids the man either to assert himself against the community or to merge himself in it. The fixed ratio between present labour in Christ’s service and final reward is set forth, diff(519) but consistently, in the two parables of the Talents and Pounds, Matthew 25:14-30, Luke 19:11-28.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". The Expositor's Greek Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/1-corinthians-3.html. 1897-1910.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

1 Corinthians 3:8 Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: but each shall receive his own reward according to his own labor.

"are one"-"are working as a team, with the same aim" (Tay) "These servants, Paul and Apollos, are not rivals. They should not be regarded as leaders of sects..their common interest is the advancement of the church. They are cooperating, not competing." [Note: _ Erdman pp. 46-47] "If no one planted, the watering would be useless. If no one watered, the planting would come to naught.." (Robertson p. 94)

"according to his own labor"-"significantly, Paul did not place the basis of wages on results but on labor. The rule of reward is not the talents or gifts, nor the success of ministers, but their labors. This brings the humblest on a level with the most exalted; the least successful with the most highly favored." [Note: _ Willis pp. 102-103]


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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/1-corinthians-3.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

one = one thing. Both belong to the same company of servants, of whom God is the Master.

his own. Emph. Greek. idios.

according to. App-104.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-corinthians-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour.

One - one in standing before God; able to do nothing without God. It is only their relative faithfulness with their gifts which will place them higher or lower (Matthew 25:14-30); therefore they ought not to be made by you the occasion, of party divisions.

And every man - rather, 'but ( de (Greek #1161)) every man.' Though in service they are essentially "one," yet every minister is separately responsible, and "shall receive his own (emphatically repeated) reward, according to his own labour." The reward is something over and above personal salvation (1 Corinthians 3:14-15; 2 John 1:8). He shall be rewarded according to, not the amount of work done, but "according to his own labour." It shall be said to him, "Well done, thou good and (not successful, but) faithful servant, enter thou," etc.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-corinthians-3.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

There is no difference. That Isaiah, in rank or importance. The work of each is equally important, and both are God's servants. Neither one deserves any special honor. God will reward each one. Paul contrasts individual and community relationships. He forbids the man to either defy the community or to merge himself into it (and lose his individuality). Compare 1 Corinthians 12:5-11; 1 Corinthians 15:10-11; Galatians 6:2-5; Romans 14:7-10. According to the work. We are saved to do good works. Compare Matthew 25:14-30; Luke 19:11-28.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "The Bible Study New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/1-corinthians-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Are one.—The planter and the waterer are one in that they are both working in the same cause. “But,” says the Apostle (not “and,” as in our version), “each man shall receive his own reward from God, not from man, according to his labour.” There is an individuality as well as a unity in the work of the ministry. This is, however, not a thing to be noticed by men, but it will be recognised by the great Master.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-corinthians-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour.
he that planteth
9; 4:6; John 4:36-38
and every
4:5; 9:17,18; 15:58; Psalms 62:12; Daniel 12:3; Matthew 5:11,12; 10:41,42; 16:27; Romans 2:6; Galatians 6:7,8; Hebrews 6:10; 1 Peter 5:4; 2 John 1:8; Revelation 2:23; 22:12

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-corinthians-3.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward, according to his own labor.

Are one. Ministers have the same office; they have the same work, they stand in the same relation to God and to his Church. They are fellow-laborers. To array the one against the other, is, therefore, inconsistent with their relation to each other and to the people whom they serve.

Every man shall receive his own reward. Diversity and unity is the law of all God's works. Ministers are one, yet they have different gifts, different services to perform. One plants and another waters, and they have different rewards.

According to his own labor. The rule of reward is not the talents or gifts, nor the success of ministers, but their labors. This brings the humblest on a level with the most exalted; the least successful with the most highly favored. The faithful, laborious minister or missionary who labors in obscurity and without apparent fruit, will meet a reward far beyond that of those who, with less self-denial and effort, are made the instruments of great results. Corinth was the field of labor of a multitude of teachers, some faithful, and some unfaithful; some laborious, and others indolent and self-indulgent. Each would have to answer for himself, and would receive a reward proportioned to his fidelity and self-denial.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:8". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/1-corinthians-3.html.

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