corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 John 3:22

 

 

and whatever we ask we receive from Him, because we keep His commandments and do the things that are pleasing in His sight.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Whatsoever we ask - In such a spirit, we receive of him, for he delights to bless the humble, upright, and sincere soul.

Because we keep his commandments - Viz., by loving him and loving our neighbor. These are the great commandments both of the old covenant and the new. And whoever is filled with this love to God and man will do those things which are pleasing to him; for love is the very soul and principle of obedience.

The word heart is used in the preceding verses for conscience; and so the Greek fathers interpret it, particularly Origen, Nicephorus, and Ecumenius; but this is not an unfrequent meaning of the word in the sacred writings.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-john-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And whatsoever we ask, we receive of him - If we are truly his children, and ask in a proper manner. See the notes at Matthew 7:7. Compare Mark 11:24; Luke 11:9; Luke 18:1 ff; John 14:13; John 15:7; 1 John 5:14. The declaration here made must be understood with these limitations:

(1)that we ask in a proper manner, James 4:3; and,

(2)that the thing asked shall be such as will be consistent for God to give; that is, such as he shall see to be best for us, 1 John 5:14. See the notes at this latter passage.

Because we keep his commandments - Not that this is the meritorious ground of our being heard, but that it furnishes evidence that we are his children, and he hears his children as such.

And do those things that are pleasing in his sight - As a parent is disposed to bestow favors on obedient, affectionate, and dutiful children, so God is on those who please him by their obedience and submission to his will. We can have no hope that he will hear us unless we do so live as to please him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-john-3.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

and whatsoever we ask we receive of him, because we keep his commandments and do the things that are pleasing in his sight.

Whatsoever we ask we receive ... "This declaration is limited by the conditions, which in other passages of Scripture, are made necessary to our petitions being granted by God."[52] There is in this verse the implied condition that it is the prayers of the obedient which are answered.

ENDNOTE:

[52] James Macknight, op. cit., p. 78.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/1-john-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And whatsoever we ask we receive of him,.... According to his promise, Matthew 7:7; that is, whatever is asked according to the will of God, in the name of Christ, and for his sake, and in faith, nothing wavering, but believing in God, in his covenant and promises, for these are provisos in the case; and such as ask in this way may exercise an holy confidence that they shall receive; and indeed they do receive what they ask for; see 1 John 5:14;

because we keep his commandments; not that keeping the commands of God is the meritorious cause of receiving anything from him; for when men have done all they can, or are assisted to do, they are but unprofitable servants in point of merit: whatever is received from God, as it is in consequence of asking, so it is entirely owing to his own grace and favour, and for the sake of Christ; but keeping the commands of God is a necessary adjunct, or, as Calvin on the text calls it, an inseparable accident, or what necessarily belongs unto, and enters into the character of such, who are heard and answered by God, and receive at his hands; for there is a great deal of truth in what the Jews say to the blind man, John 9:31; and which may serve as a comment on these words:

and do those things that are pleasing in his sight; as keeping of his commandments is; not that these things ingratiate into the love and favour of God, or are the causes and conditions of it, for the love of God is prior to anything of this kind; nor are they the causes of men's acceptance with God, for the acceptance both of persons and services is only in Christ the beloved; but these things are what God approves of, when done in faith, from a principle of love, and with a view to his glory: and since he hears such persons that are worshippers of him, and do his will, and has promised good things to them; this is therefore a reason strengthening their confidence in him, that what they ask they shall receive.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-john-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

22 And whatsoever we ask, we receive of him, because we keep his commandments, and do those things that are pleasing in his sight.

(22) The conclusion, that faith in Christ and love one towards another are things joined together, and therefore the outward testimonies of sanctification must and do answer that inward testimony of the Spirit given to us.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-john-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

we receive — as a matter of fact, according to His promise. Believers, as such, ask only what is in accordance with God‘s will; or if they ask what God wills not, they bow their will to God‘s will, and so God grants them either their request, or something better than it.

because we keep his commandments — Compare Psalm 66:18; Psalm 34:15; Psalm 145:18, Psalm 145:19. Not as though our merits earned a hearing for our prayers, but when we are believers in Christ, all our works of faith being the fruit of His Spirit in us, are “pleasing in God‘s sight”; and our prayers being the voice of the same Spirit of God in us, naturally and necessarily are answered by Him.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-john-3.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Whatsoever we ask (ο εαν αιτωμενho ean aitōmen). Indefinite relative clause with modal ανan and the present active subjunctive, like οτι εαν καταγινωσκηιhoti ean kataginōskēi in 1 John 3:20. In form no limitations are placed here save that of complete fellowship with God, which means complete surrender of our will to that of God our Father. See the clear teaching of Jesus on this subject in Mark 11:24; Luke 11:9; John 14:12.; John 16:23 and his example (Mark 14:36; Matthew 26:39; Luke 22:42). The answer may not always be in the form that we expect, but it will be better.

We receive of him (λαμβανομεν απ αυτουlambanomen ap' autou). See 1 John 1:5 for απ αυτουap' autou (from him).

Because (οτιhoti). Twofold reason why we receive regularly (λαμβανομενlambanomen) the answer to our prayers (1) “we keep” (τηρουμενtēroumen for which see 1 John 2:3) his commandments and (2) “we do” (ποιουμενpoioumen we practise regularly) “the things that are pleasing” (τα αρεσταta aresta old verbal adjective from αρεσκωareskō to please, with dative in John 8:29 with same phrase; Acts 12:3 and infinitive in Acts 6:2, only other N.T. examples) “in his sight” (ενωπιον αυτουenōpion autou common late vernacular preposition in papyri, lxx, and in N.T., except Matthew and Mark, chiefly by Luke and in the Apocalypse), in God‘s eye, as in Hebrews 13:21.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/1-john-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

We ask ( αἰτῶμεν )

See on Luke 11:9.

We receive of Him ( λαμβάνομεν ἀπ ' αὐτοῦ )

On the form of expression, see on 1 John 1:5. For the thought, compare John 15:7.

We keep ( τηροῦμεν )

See on 1 Peter 1:5. Note the combination of keep and do. Watchful discernment and habitual practice. Compare Psalm 123:2. The same combination occurs 1 John 5:2, 1 John 5:3, where instead of the first τηρῶμεν keepread ποιῶμεν doPleasing ( ἀρεστά )

See John 8:29.

In His sight ( ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ )

Compare ἕμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ beforeHim, or in His presence (1 John 3:19). In His sight “accentuates the thought of the divine regard. Compare John 7:37and John 20:30” (Westcott).


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/1-john-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

22And whatsoever we ask These two things are connected, confidence and prayer. As before he shewed that an evil conscience is inconsistent with confidence, so now he declares that none can really pray to God but those who with a pure heart, fear and rightly worship him. The latter follows from the former. It is a general truth taught in Scripture, that the ungodly are not heard by God, but that on the contrary, their sacrifices and prayers are an abomination to him. Hence the door is here closed up against hypocrites, lest they should in contempt of him rush into his presence.

He does not yet mean that a good conscience must be brought, as though it obtained favor to our prayers. Woe to us if we look on works, which have nothing in them but what is a cause of fear and trembling. The faithful, then, cannot otherwise come to God’s tribunal than by relying on Christ the Mediator. But as the love of God is ever connected with faith, the Apostle, in order that he might the more severely reprove hypocrites, deprives them of that singular privilege with which God favors his own children; that is, lest they should think that their prayers have an access to God.

By saying, because we keep his commandments, he means not that confidence in prayer is founded on our works; but he teaches this only, that true religion and the sincere worship of God cannot be separated from faith. Nor ought it to appear strange that he uses a causal particle, though he does not speak of a cause; for an inseparable addition is sometimes mentioned as a cause as when one says, Because the sun shines over us at midday, there is more heat; but it does not follow that heat comes from light.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/1-john-3.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

22 And whatsoever we ask, we receive of him, because we keep his commandments, and do those things that are pleasing in his sight.

Ver. 22. And whatsoever we ask] sc. According to his will. Fiat voluntas mea, quia tua, said Luther. I can have what I will of God, said one; for my will shall be concentric with his will.

Because we keep] The obedience of faith emboldens us; yet may no man say as the prodigal, "Give me the portion that belongeth to me." It was a proud speech of that emperor (Antonin. Philo.) that said, Non sic Deum coluimus, aut sic viximus, ut ille nos vinceret, We have not so served God, that the enemy should overcome us. It was much worse in that arrogant Papist that said, God forbid that we should enjoy heaven as of alms to us; no, we have it by purchase or conquest.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-john-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 John 3:22. Whatsoever we ask, we receive of him, There are four conditions on which men may expect to have their prayers heard: First, If they pray for things agreeable to the will of God; that is, for things in themselves truly good and proper. See ch. 1 John 5:14-15. Secondly, If they pray in a right manner, or with a right temper and disposition of mind; that is, with faith in the atoning Blood, and in the wisdom, goodness, power, and over-ruling providence of God; with humility and resignation to the Divine will, with importunity, patience, and perseverance: Thirdly, If they pray for a good end, or with a design to make a right use of mercies when bestowed: Fourthly, and above all, If they be real Christians, and of course keep the commandments of God, and do those things which are pleasing in his sight. In this verse, St. John assigns another reason forcultivating universal righteousness, and particularly mutual love; namely, that then their prayers would be heard, and God would grant them all proper blessings.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-john-3.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. An extraordinary favour and privilege insured, Whatsoever we ask, we receive of him; that is, whatsoever we ask according to his will, we are sure to receive, either in kind or in equivalency. It shall either be given in mercy, or denied in love; for verily God is as kind in denying some of our requests, as in answering others; we often cry for that which it would be cruelty for God to give; we know not what is best to beg, but an infinitely wise God knoweth what is fittest to give. Dat pre jocundis aptissima.

Observe, 2. The qualification of the persons to whom this precious privilege does belong. They keep God's commandments, and do the things that please him. According to our hearing God's commandments, so he hears and answers our prayers; with what measure we mete to God, God will measure to us again. If God's commands be trod under our feet, no wonder that all our prayers fall to the ground. God hears not us, if we hear not him. If we keep his commandments, whatsoever we ask, we receive of him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/1-john-3.html. 1700-1703.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

1 John 3:22. By καί the following is closely connected with the preceding, inasmuch as it states what further happens when, in consequence of non-condemnation on the part of the heart, the παῤῥησία πρὸς τὸν θεόν exists; it is not merely the consciousness of the hearing of our prayers, but it is this hearing itself.

ἐὰν αἰτῶμεν] is to be taken quite generally, and must not be spoiled by arbitrary limitations; the necessary limitation lies, on the one hand, in the subject itself: the child of God asks for nothing which is contrary to his Father’s will, comp. 1 John 5:14; and, on the other hand, in the παῤῥησία with which he prays; comp. Matthew 21:22; the contrary in James 1:6-7.

λαμβάνομεν ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ] i.e. τοῦ θεοῦ. The present is not used instead of the future (Grotius); the subject is here not something future, but what constantly occurs in the life of believers. Augustine suitably says: Charitas ipsa gemit, charitas ipsa orat, contra hanc aures claudere non novit, qui illam dedit.

ὅτι τὰς ἐντολὰς αὐτοῦ κ. τ. λ.] ὅτι is connected with the immediately preceding λαμβάνομεν, and states the ground of God’s manifestation of love in the hearing of prayer; this ground, which, however, is not to be regarded as the causa meritoria, is the childlike obedience of him who prays, wherein God recognises him as His child; the idea of obedience is expressed in two mutually co-ordinate sentences (similar to the Hebrew parallelism): τὰς ἐντολὰς αὐτοῦ and τὰ ἀρεστὰ ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ are synonymous;(248) by ποιεῖν the obedience is specified as active; the second clause indicates that it consists, not in a slavish subjection to the commandment, but in a childlike fulfilment of that which is pleasing to God. In John 8:29, ἀρεστόν is construed with the dative; only in Acts 6:2; Acts 12:3 is the word besides found; similar is the expression: ἀπόδεκτον ἐνώπιον τοῦ θεοῦ (1 Timothy 5:4).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/1-john-3.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

It is supposed, where there is that accord with God, that what was last, and is next after, said implies, there will be no disposition to ask any thing disagreeable to his will, or otherwise than as he hath expressed his will about the matter of prayer. And then,

whatsoever we ask, we receive, i.e. are as sure to receive it, in the kind or in equivalence, as if we had it, 1 John 5:14.

Because we keep his commandments; i.e. this is the cause of our certainty, being the evidence of our state God-ward, Psalms 66:18,19; not of our receiving the things prayed for, which we only owe to his free promised mercy in Christ.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-john-3.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Whatsoever we ask; in this state of filial confidence, which comes from the consciousness of keeping God’s commandments; that is, as the context shows, of being led by love to obey God.

We receive of him; we always receive of God an answer to our sincere and believing petitions, though not always in the particular form in which we present them, because God sees that another form is better for us.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Family Bible New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/1-john-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

22. This verse is so closely connected with the preceding one, that not more than a comma or semicolon should be placed between them. When a good conscience gives us boldness towards God our prayers are granted, for children in such relations to their heavenly Father cannot ask anything which He will refuse.

καὶ ὃ ἐὰν αἰτῶμεν. The καί is probably epexegetic, as in 1 John 3:20, and explains the special character of our boldness. See on 1 John 5:15.

λαμβάνομεν. The present is to be taken quite literally; not as the present for the future. It may be a long time before we see the results of our prayer; but it is granted at once. As S. Augustine says, “He who gave us love cannot close His ears against the groans and prayers of love.” For λαμβάνειν ἀπό see on 1 John 2:27.

τὰς ἐντολὰς αὐτ. τ. This should certainly be plural, commandments: previous English Versions have the plural, and there seems to be no trace of a various reading, so that one suspects a misprint in the edition of 1611. Ὅτι depends upon λαμβάνομεν, not upon παῤῥησίαν ἔχομεν: we receive because we are loyal. This is in harmony with the Gospel and with Scripture generally: ‘We know that God heareth not sinners: but if any man be a worshipper of God, and do His will, him He heareth’ (John 9:31); ‘The Lord is far from the wicked, but He heareth the prayer of the righteous’ (Proverbs 15:29; comp. Psalms 66:18-19; Job 27:8-9; Isaiah 1:11-15). For τὰς ἐντολὰς τηρεῖν see on 1 John 2:3.

τὰ ἀρεστὰποιοῦμεν. Not the same as τὰς ἐντολὰς τηρεῖν: the one is obedience, and may be slavish; the other is love, and is free. We seem to have here another reminiscence of the Gospel: ὄτι ἐγὼ τὰ ἀρεστὰ αὐτῷ ποιῶ πάντοτε (John 8:29). Excepting Acts 6:2; Acts 12:3, ἀρεστός occurs nowhere else in N.T. The different phrases ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ (1 John 3:19) and ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ suit their respective contexts. Both indicate the Divine Presence: but ἔμπροσθεν brings out the man’s regard to God, ἐνώπιον God’s regard to him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/1-john-3.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22. And—We feel full access in prayer.

Whatsoever—In this frame of sweet accord with God we ask, we receive. That spirit of accord will, indeed, circumscribe our ask within the limits of God’s will that we should have. And the Spirit grants delightful contentment and resignation to our lot within that blessed sphere.

Keep his commandments—For without this objective test no subjective assurance is genuine. Our apostle gives no comfort to a mere emotional self-gratulation which is not confirmed by the volitional and active keeping and doing the positive commandments, that is, doing in all respects what is conscientious and right. The old Mosaic decalogue is not repealed in our behalf. The emotionalism that repeals the commandments is antinomianism.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-john-3.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

ask. App-134.

of. App-104., but the texts read apo (App-104.)

keep. See Matthew 19:17.

pleasing. Greek. arestos. See Acts 6:2 (reason).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-john-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And whatsoever we ask, we receive of him, because we keep his commandments, and do those things that are pleasing in his sight.

We receive - according to His promise (Matthew 7:8). Believers, as such, ask what is in accordance with God's will; or if they ask what God wills not, they bow their will to God's; so God grants them either their request or something better.

Because we keep his commandments - (cf. Psalms 34:15; Psalms 66:18; Psalms 145:18-19.) Not that our merits earn a hearing, but our works of faith being the fruit of His Spirit in us, are 'pleasing in God's sight; and our prayers being the voice of the same Spirit in us (Romans 8:26), necessarily are answered by Him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-john-3.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And whatsoever we ask, we receive of him, because we keep his commandments, and do those things that are pleasing in his sight.
whatsoever
5:14; Psalms 10:17; 34:4,15-17; 50:15; 66:18,19; 145:18,19; Proverbs 15:29; Proverbs 28:9; Isaiah 1:15; 55:6,7; Jeremiah 29:12,13; 33:3; Matthew 7:7,8; 21:22; Mark 11:24; Luke 11:9-13; John 9:31; 14:13; 15:7; 16:23,24; James 1:5; 5:16
because
23,24; Matthew 7:24,25; 17:5; John 15:10; Acts 17:30; 20:21
do
John 6:29; 8:29; 9:31; Philippians 4:18; Colossians 1:10; Hebrews 13:21

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-john-3.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

We receive from him. "Doing what is right and having a heart that does not condemn us are two sides of the same coin. Because we are his children, he hears and answers our prayers." Compare Proverbs 15:29; Psalm 66:18-19; Job 27:8-9; Isaiah 1:11-15.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". "The Bible Study New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/1-john-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Because we keep his commandments is the condition on which we will receive what we ask. Keeping the commandments includes the obligation of consulting the scriptures to learn what would be right for us to receive. It also includes our doing the things that please Him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on 1 John 3:22". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/1-john-3.html. 1952.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology