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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 11:30

 

 

"Are they not across the Jordan, west of the way toward the sunset, in the land of the Canaanites who live in the Arabah, opposite Gilgal, beside the oaks of Moreh?

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Are they not on the other side Jordan,.... Opposite to that where Moses now was in the plains of Moab, even in Samaria; so in the MisnahF20Sotah, c. 7. sect. 5. it is said,"as soon as Israel passed over Jordan, they came to Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal, which are in Samaria;'but those mountains were not near Jordan nor Jericho, to which the people of Israel came first, but sixty miles from thence; though they were, as Moses says, on the other side from the place they now were:

by the way wherewith the sun goeth down; or, as the Targum of Jonathan,"after the way of the sun setting;'following that, or taking their direction from thence, signifying that they lay to the west of Jordan:

in the land of the Canaanites; of that particular tribe or nation which were eminently called Canaanites, for these dwelt by the sea by the coast of Jordan, Numbers 13:29 or as further described:

that dwell in the champaign over against Gilgal; in the plain open champaign country opposite to Gilgal; not that Gilgal Joshua encamped at before he came to Jericho, which in Moses's time was not known by that name, but another, as Dr. LightfootF21Chorograph. Cent. c. 48. observes, and he thinks Galilee is meant:

beside the plains of Moreh; near to Shechem, Genesis 12:6 and that Gerizim, one of these mountains, was not far from Shechem, is evident from Judges 9:6 and so in the MisnahF23Sotah, c. 7. sect. 5. it is said, that these mountains were on the side of Shechem, which is in the plains of Moreh, as in Deuteronomy 11:30 as the plains of Moreh here denote Shechem, so there: Benjamin of Tudela saysF24Itinerarium, p. 38, 40. there is a valley between them, in which lies Shechem; and in his time there were on Mount Gerizim fountains and orchards, but Mount Ebal was dry like stones and rocks. The Targum of Jonathan here, instead of Moreh, reads Mamre; see Genesis 13:18.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/deuteronomy-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

[Are] they not on the other side Jordan, by the way l where the sun goeth down, in the land of the Canaanites, which dwell in the champaign over against Gilgal, beside the plains of Moreh?

(l) Meaning, in Samaria.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/deuteronomy-11.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Are they not on the other side Jordan, by the way where the sun goeth down, in the land of the Canaanites, which dwell in the champaign over against Gilgal, beside the plains of Moreh?

Over against — Looking toward Gilgal, tho' at some considerable distance from it.

Beside the plains of Moreh — This was one of the first places that Abram came to in Canaan. So that in sending them thither to hear the blessing and the curse, they were minded of the promise made to Abram in that very place, Genesis 12:6,7.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/deuteronomy-11.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

30.Are they not on the other side of Jordan. Although the form of interrogation is common in Hebrew, yet in this place Moses affirms more vehemently than as if he had only stated directly that these mountains were in the land of Canaan; for he wishes to encourage them in the confidence of entering the promised inheritance; just as he adds immediately afterwards, “Ye shall pass over Jordan.” For, although they had already experienced the miraculous power of God in the conquest of the Amorites, and in heir occupation of the land of Bashan, yet such was their incredulity, that it was necessary constantly to dissipate their fears, so that they might lay aside all hesitation, and boldly prepare to advance. Finally, he founds an exhortation upon this great goodness of God; for the actual enjoyment of the land ought to have stimulated them the more in the service of God, because they were made to inherit it for the purpose of keeping the Law.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/deuteronomy-11.html. 1840-57.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 30. Over against Gilgal These words do not refer to the situation of the two mountains Gerizim and Ebal, which were in the middle of the tribe of Ephraim, several miles west from Gilgal; but they refer to the Canaanites, (i.e. one of the seven devoted nations, properly called Canaanites,) whose territories are here said to extend from the plain of Gilgal, which was near Jordan, (Joshua 2:9.) to these mountains, Gerizim and Ebal, which lay near the plain or oaken grove of Moreh; that very place of Canaan, where Abraham formerly dwelt. Genesis 12:6. The Samaritan has it, over against Gilgal, near the oak of Moreh, towards Sichem. See Genesis 35:4.

Reflections on the foregoing chapters, by Lord Clarendon.

"There could not be a better way found out, though that was not sufficient to keep the children of Israel in their integrity towards God, than by the frequent putting them in mind, and fixing in their memory the history of all the miracles which he had wrought for them, from the time of their being in Egypt, to their being in a triumphant condition in the land of Canaan; in which they had been eye-witnesses of more and greater miracles, than all the world besides had been acquainted with from the time of the deluge. All that he expected from them for all his mercies, was, that they would acknowledge him as their God, and depend upon him, and not have recourse to other gods, from whom they had received no benefit, and who never had done, nor ever could do good for those who depended upon them. And if the memory of all the wonders he had done in Egypt, their walking through the sea as upon dry land, and seeing all those who pursued them covered and drowned in that very sea: if their having found bread in the wilderness, and a dry rock having given them drink when they were at the point of fainting: if the subduing many nations, more warlike than themselves, and putting them into the quiet possession of their habitations and dominions: if all this would not imprint a notion of his omnipotence and paternal affection in their hearts, in such indelible characters, that they should never be in doubt to whom they ought to pay their vows, or whither to repair in their distress; they must be more brutish creatures, and more unworthy of his future protection and preservation, than the fowls of the air or the beasts of the field."

"We are much more inexcusable than these Israelites, if, after the clear and full information we have received, and which is every day inculcated, of the history of the whole life and death of our Saviour, the infinite benefits we have received from him, and the infinite torments which he endured for us, we do either forget the matter or the manner of those obligations. But if, by the vain hopes or fears of this world, our ambition of honour and preferment, or our apprehension of punishment or disgrace, we are startled in the performance of our duty to him, and observation of his commands; we have—pretend what we will—forgot what he did, and what he said; how much he despised the world, and all the temptations thereof, out of his love and value of us, and only to teach us the way to come to him in a better world. If we be terrified, by the power and threats of princes, from doing any thing which he has enjoined us, or to act any thing that he has forbidden us to do; we have forgotten that kings are to tremble before him for those very threats, and for using the power he has given them so unrighteously; whilst we should at the same time be commended and justified for being obstinate in his commandments. There needs nothing under divine grace but a constant and due reflection that there will be a day of judgment, no man knows how soon; and that he, who died himself to save us, is to sit judge upon that day; to make us appear before him with confidence as fit objects of his mercy."


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/deuteronomy-11.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Over against Gilgal; looking towards Gilgal, though at some considerable distance from it, as this particle is sometimes used.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/deuteronomy-11.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

30. By the way where the sun goeth down — Referring to the great highway for travel from Syria to Egypt, which runs through the land on the west side of the Jordan. There was another main road on the east side of the river.

Which dwell in the champaign — In the Arabah. This term was applied to the whole valley, extending from the sources of the Jordan to the gulf of Akabah. As the Israelites are now encamped on the east side of the Jordan, the Arabah would be right before them as they looked toward the west. Knobel thinks the region in which Nablus is situated to be meant.

Over against Gilgal — Not Gilgal on the west side of the Jordan near Jericho, but probably the Gilgal mentioned in 2 Kings 2:1. In the narrative it is said that Elijah and Elisha came down from Gilgal to Bethel, and from Beth-el, going by Jericho, they pass on to the Jordan. This Gilgal was higher than Beth-el, and evidently more remote from Jordan. A place bearing the name Jiljilieh is thought to be the site of this Gilgal. The critics have made this one of the points of attack on the authenticity of the book. “It must seem strange that Moses, who had never been in the land of Canaan, should know all these places and be able to describe them so accurately. But it is still more strange that he should know the name Gilgal, which, according to the book of Joshua, was not given to the place till after the people had entered the land of Canaan. It is plain the text was written at a later age, when these names and places were familiarly known.” — Pentateuch Examined, ii, p. 200. Now it would be strange indeed if Moses were not familiar with the geography of the land. The monuments of Egypt show acquaintance with Syria. The great roads for commerce and war led through Canaan. Forty years spent in Egypt, forty years in Midian, and forty years on the very borders of the land would certainly give opportunity for familiar knowledge of the physical features of the land. As there were several places that bore the name Gilgal, one at least may have had that name before the conquest.

The plains of Moreh — Rather, the terebinths of Moreh, hallowed in the minds of the Israelites as the place of the divine manifestation to Abraham. Genesis 12:6-7.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/deuteronomy-11.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Far. Hebrew, "over against Galgal, beside the plains of More, or Aluni More." Samaritan reads, "the plain of More, near Sichem," as Exodus xx. 17. (Haydock) --- This is styled the noble vale, Genesis xii. 6. (Calmet) --- The road from Jericho to the Mediterranean Sea, left these mountains on the north. The Chanaanite inhabited all that region, from Galgal to Sichem. How far these places were distant from each other, is not here specified; though Eusebius seems to have inferred from this text, that Garizim was near Jericho. But the plain might be very extensive or noble, and reach from Sichem as far as Galgala.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/deuteronomy-11.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Are they not. ? Figure of speech Erotesis. App-6.

other side. These particulars connect this place with the rehearsing of the law to Abraham. Compare Genesis 12:6.

champaign = plain. Heb "arabah. Compare Deuteronomy 1:1.

Gilgal = enclosure. Not the Gilgal near Jericho.

beside = near. Hence thirty miles from the Gilgal of Joshua 5:9.

Moreh. Compare Genesis 12:6, Genesis 12:7; Genesis 35:4.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/deuteronomy-11.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(30) Where the sun goeth down.—A memorable passage, as attesting the true position of the speaker, east of Jordan, over against Jericho. The sun has been seen by travellers from that very spot going down exactly in the remarkable gap between Ebal and Gerizim.

The plains of Moren.—Rather, the oaks or terebinths of Moreh. (See Genesis 12:6.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/deuteronomy-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Are they not on the other side Jordan, by the way where the sun goeth down, in the land of the Canaanites, which dwell in the champaign over against Gilgal, beside the plains of Moreh?
Gilgal
Genesis 12:6; Joshua 5:9; Judges 7:1

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 11:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/deuteronomy-11.html.

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