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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 24:10

 

 

"When you make your neighbor a loan of any sort, you shall not enter his house to take his pledge.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

When thou dost lend thy brother anything,.... Any sum of money he stands in need of, or demanded a debt of him, as Jarchi; money he is indebted to thee, which is the sense of the Septuagint version; and he is not able to pay it, but offers something: in pawn till he can pay it:

thou shall not go into his house to fetch his pledge; which would be an exercise of too much power and authority, to go into a neighbour's house, and take what was liked; and besides, as no doubt he would take the best, so he might take that which the poor man could not spare: and indeed, according to the Jewish canonsF11Misn. Bava Metzia, c. 9. sect. 13. , he could not take any pledge at all, but with the knowledge, and by the leave, of the sanhedrim, or court of judicature.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/deuteronomy-24.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go e into his house to fetch his pledge.

(e) As though you would appoint what to have, but shall receive what be may spare.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/deuteronomy-24.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

Thou shalt not go in — To prevent both the poor man's reproach by having his wants exposed, and the creditor's greediness which might be occasioned by the sight of something which he desired, and the debtor could not spare.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/deuteronomy-24.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.When thou dost lend thy brother anything He provides against another iniquity in reclaiming a pledge, viz., that the creditor should ransack the house and furniture of his brother, in order to pick out the pledge at his pleasure. For, if this option were given to the avaricious rich, they would be satisfied with no moderation, but would seize upon all that was best, as if making an assault on the very entrails of the poor: in a word, they would ransack men’s houses, or at any rate, whilst they contemptuously refused this or that, they would fill the wretched with rebuke and shame. God, therefore, will have no pledge reclaimed, except what the debtor of his own accord, and at his own convenience, shall bring out of his house, lie even proceeds further, that the creditor shall not take back any pledge which he knows to be necessary for the poor: for example, if he should pledge the bed on which he sleeps, or his counterpane, or cloak, or mantle. For it is not just that lie should be stripped, so as to suffer from cold, or to be deprived of other aids, the use of which he could not forego without loss or inconvenience. A promise, therefore, is added, that this act of humanity will be pleasing to God, when the poor shall sleep in the garment which is restored to him. He speaks even more distinctly, and says: The poor will bless thee, and it shall be accounted to thee for righteousness. For God indicates that He hears the prayers of the poor and needy, lest the rich man should think the bounty thrown away which lie confers upon a lowly individual. We must, indeed, be more than iron-hearted, unless we are disposed to such liberality as this, when we understand that, although the poor have not the means of repaying us in this world, still they have the power of recompensing us before God, i e. , by obtaining grace for us through their prayers. An implied threat is also conveyed, that if the poor man should sleep inconveniently, or catch cold through our fault, God. will hear his groans, so that our cruelty will not be unpunished. But if the poor man, upon whom we have had compassion, should be ungrateful, yet, even though he is silent, our kindness will cry out to God; whilst, on the other hand, our tyrannical harshness will suffice to provoke God’s vengeance, although he who has been treated unkindly should patiently swallow his wrong. To be unto righteousness (108) is equivalent to being approved by God, or being an acceptable act; for since the keeping of the Law is true righteousness, this praise is extended to particular acts of obedience. Although it must be observed that this righteousness fails and vanishes, unless we universally fulfill whatever God enjoins. It is, indeed, a part of righteousness to restore a poor man’s pledge; but if a mall be only beneficent in this respect., whilst in other matters he robs his brethren; or if, whilst free from avarice, he exercises violence, is given to lust or gluttony, the particular righteousness, although pleasing in itself to God, will not come into account. In fact, we must hold fast the axiom, that no work is accounted righteous before God, unless il, proceeds from a man of purity and integrity; whereas there is none such to be found. Consequently, no works are imputed unto righteousness, except because God deigns to bestow His gratuitous favor on believers. In itself, indeed, it would be true, that whatever act of obedience to God we perform, it is accounted for righteousness, i e. , if the whole course of our life corresponded to it, whereas no work proceeds from us which is not corrupted by some defect. Thus, we must fly to God’s mercy, in order that, being reconciled to us, He may also accept our work.

What he had previously prescribed respecting the poor, lie afterwards applies to widows alone, yet so as to recommend all poor persons to us under their name; and this we gather both from the beginning of the verse (17,) in which lie instructs them to deal fairly and justly with strangers and orphans, and also from the reason which is added, viz., that they should reflect that they were bondmen in the land of Egypt; for their condition there did not suffer them proudly to insult the miserable; and it is natural that he should be the more affected with the ills of others who has experienced the same. Since, then, this reason is a general one, it is evident also that the precept is general, that we should be humane towards all that are in want.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/deuteronomy-24.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Deuteronomy 24:10 When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

Ver. 10. To fetch his pledge.] To see, Quam sit eurta supellex, and to pick and choose what pledge thou pleasest.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/deuteronomy-24.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

To prevent both the poor man’s reproach, by having his wants exposed to view, and the creditor’s insolence and greediness, which might be occasioned by the sight of something which he desired, and the debtor could not spare.


Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/deuteronomy-24.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. When thou dost lend, etc. — The creditor was not to go into the house of the debtor to exact such a pledge as he deemed the best security, but he was to let the borrower bring out to him what he might be able to spare.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/deuteronomy-24.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Pledge. This was left to the choice of the debtor, provided he gave sufficient. The Athenian and Roman laws allowed a person to search his neighbour's house, for what he had lost: but he was to enter covered only with a short garment round his middle, (Calmet) to prevent his taking away any thing which did not belong to him.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/deuteronomy-24.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

lend. Compare Exodus 22:25-27.

brother = neighbour. pledge. Hebrew. "abot. = a security. Not the same word in verses: Deuteronomy 24:10, Deuteronomy 24:11, Deuteronomy 24:12, Deuteronomy 24:13 as in Deuteronomy 24:6 and Deuteronomy 24:17.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/deuteronomy-24.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge.

When thou dost lend thy brother any thing , [ masha't (Hebrew #4859)] - the loan between one Israelite and another of any article that was required, on the ground of pledge until it was restored, without any pecuniary consideration for the loan. Different words are used when interest was taken (Leviticus 25:36-37; Deuteronomy 23:19-20). The course recommended was, in kind and considerate regard, to spare the borrower's feelings by not exposing the poverty of his house, or affording an opportunity for the creditor to show insolvency. In the case of a poor man who had pledged his cloak, it was to be restored before night, as the poor in Eastern countries have commonly no other covering for wrapping themselves in when they go to sleep than the hyke or plaid they have worn during the day (see the notes at Exodus 22:26-27).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/deuteronomy-24.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

When thou dost lend thy brother any thing, thou shalt not go into his house to fetch his pledge.
When
15:8
lend thy brother any thing
Heb. lend the loan of any thing to thy brother.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 24:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/deuteronomy-24.html.

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