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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 3:25

 

 

`Let me, I pray, cross over and see the fair land that is beyond the Jordan, that good hill country and Lebanon.'

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

That goodly mountain - i. e., that mountainous district. The fiat districts of the East are generally scorched, destitute of water, and therefore sterile: the hilly ones, on the contrary, are of more tempered climate, and fertilized by the streams from the high grounds. Compare Deuteronomy 11:11.

The whole of this prayer of Moses is very characteristic. The longing to witness further manifestations of God‘s goodness and glory, and the reluctance to leave unfinished an undertaking which he had been permitted to commence, are striking traits in his character: compare Exodus 32:32 ff; Exodus 33:12, Exodus 33:18 ff; Numbers 14:12 ff.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I pray thee, let me go over and see the good land that is beyond Jordan,.... The land of Canaan, the land flowing with milk and honey; a land which he describes as a most excellent one, Deuteronomy 8:7. To see this land, he was very desirous of going over the river Jordan, beyond which it lay with respect to the place where he now was:

that goodly mountain, and Lebanon; or, "that goodly mountain, even Lebanon"; which lay to the north of the land of Canaan, and was famous for cedar and odoriferous trees. But if two distinct mountains are meant, the goodly mountain may design Mount Moriah, on which the temple was afterwards built, and of which Moses might have a foresight; and some by Lebanon think that is meant, which was built of the cedars of Lebanon, and therefore goes by that name, Zechariah 11:1 and a foreview of this made the mountain so precious to Moses, and desirable to be seen by him. So the Targum of Jonathan;"that goodly mountain in which is built the city of Jerusalem, and Mount Lebanon, in which the Shechinah shall dwell'to which agrees the note of Aben Ezra, who interprets the goodly mountain of Jerusalem, and Lebanon of the house of the sanctuary. In the Septuagint it is called Antilibanus. Mount Libanus had its name not from frankincense growing upon it, as some have thought; for it does not appear that any did grow upon it, for that came from Seba in Arabia Felix; but from the whiteness of it, through the continual snows that were on it, just as the Alps have their name for the same reason; and so Jerom saysF2In Hieremiam, c. 18. 14. of Lebanon, that the snow never leaves from the tops of it, or is ever so overcome by the heat of the sun as wholly to melt; to the same purpose also TacitusF3Hist. l. 5. c. 6. says, and Mr. MaundrellF4Journey from Aleppo, p. 139, 140. , who was there in May, speaks of deep snow on it, and represents the cedars as standing in snow.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

I pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that [is] beyond Jordan, that goodly k mountain, and Lebanon.

(k) He means Zion, where the Temple should be built, and God honoured.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

I pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan, that goodly mountain, and Lebanon — The natural and very earnest wish of Moses to be allowed to cross the Jordan was founded on the idea that the divine threatening might be conditional and revertible. “That goodly mountain” is supposed by Jewish writers to have pointed to the hill on which the temple was to be built (Deuteronomy 12:5; Exodus 15:2). But biblical scholars now, generally, render the words - “that goodly mountain, even Lebanon,” and consider it to be mentioned as typifying the beauty of Palestine, of which hills and mountains were so prominent a feature.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan, that goodly mountain, and Lebanon.

Let me go over — For he supposed God's threatening might be conditional and reversible, as many others were.

That goodly mountain — Which the Jews not improbably understood of that mountain on which the temple was to be built. This he seems to call that mountain, emphatically and eminently, that which was much in Moses's thoughts, though not in his eye.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/deuteronomy-3.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

AN UNANSWERED PRAYER

‘I pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan, that goodly mountain, and Lebanon.’

Deuteronomy 3:25

I. It was a land, a good land, which Moses looked upon; it was a land of promise which God had prepared.—Canaan was, in a sense, the heaven of Israel’s hope: the more heaven-like, perhaps, because it was so fair a feature of our world, because it was a land on which a foot could be firmly and joyfully planted—a home in which a man and family, a nation, could nobly dwell. St. Peter speaks of ‘a new heaven and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.’ St. Peter and St. John looked for a scene which should be familiar, however transfigured, a scene which should keep its home-like character, however transformed.

II. The images which are employed by the sacred writers as most expressive, when they are treating of heaven, are all borrowed from the higher forms of the development of man’s social and national life.—This means that the human interests and associations prolong themselves in their integrity through death, and constitute the highest sphere of interest and activity in the eternal world. A home, a city, a country, a kingdom—these are the images; on the working out of these ideas the writers of the Scriptures spend all their force.

III. That good land beyond Jordan had some heaven-like feature herein: it was to be the theatre of the highest and holiest human association, under conditions most favourable to the most perfect development, and in an atmosphere of life which God’s benediction should make an atmosphere of bliss.

Illustration

(1) ‘“Let it suffice thee; speak no more;

This Jordan thou shalt not pass o’er.”

And yet, upon the Mount, these three,

Moses, Elias, Christ, I see!

Two roads to Canaan Thou hast given,

One over Jordan, one from heaven.’

(2) ‘It looks so fair, across the Jordan! For so long a time I have been journeying to it, and now to be shut out! Ah, but who shuts me out? It is not God; it is my sin. Let me not blame God, but rather praise Him, that He is a God of justice, and not of weak yielding.’

(3) ‘There are limits beyond which the most favoured servants may not go. They may seek by prayer to reverse or change the Divine plan, but it may not be. We plead for others, and we win untold blessing. We plead for ourselves, and the Lord will not hear. There comes a time when He even bids us ask no more. The Apostle entreated that the thorn might be taken out, but it was left in. Moses prayed that he might enter Canaan, but he died on the outskirts. But if either of them had stood where they stand now, they would not have pressed their suit, because they would have known it was better not. Ah, my soul, thou hast many unanswered prayers treasured in thy thought, and concerning some thou feelest unable to pray longer; take that as probably indicating God’s gentle negative; but concerning such as thou feelest still able to offer, pray on, thy power to ask is the harbinger of the answer.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Deuteronomy 3:25 I pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that [is] beyond Jordan, that goodly mountain, and Lebanon.

Ver. 25. The good land.] The "glory of all lands." [Ezekiel 20:6]

Goodly mountain.] Moriah likely, whereon the temple afterwards stood.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 3:25

I. It was a land, a good land, which Moses looked upon; it was a land of promise which God had prepared. Canaan was, in a sense, the heaven of Israel's hope: the more heaven-like, perhaps, because it was so fair a feature of our world, because it was a land on which a foot could be firmly and joyfully planted—a home in which a man and family, a nation, could nobly dwell. St. Peter speaks of "a new heaven and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness." St. Peter and St. John looked for a scene which should be familiar, however transfigured, a scene which should keep its home-like character, however transformed.

II. The images which are employed by the sacred writers as most expressive when they are treating of heaven are all borrowed from the higher forms of the development of man's social and national life. This means that the human interests and associations prolong themselves in their integrity through death, and constitute the highest sphere of interest and activity in the eternal world. A home, a city, a country, a kingdom—these are the images; on the working out of these ideas the writers of the Scriptures spend all their force.

III. That good land beyond Jordan had some heaven-like feature herein: it was to be the theatre of the highest and holiest human association, under conditions most favourable to the most perfect development, and in an atmosphere of life which God's benediction should make an atmosphere of bliss.

J. Baldwin Brown, The Soul's Exodus and Pilgrimage, p. 361.


References: Deuteronomy 3:25, Deuteronomy 3:26.—Preacher's Monthly, vol. vii., p. 299. Deuteronomy 3:27-29.—Parker, vol. v., p. 3. Deut 3—Parker, vol. iv., p. 90. Deuteronomy 4:1-23.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. iv.,p. 212. Deuteronomy 4:2.—H. L. Mansel, Bampton Lectures, 1858, p. 1. Deuteronomy 4:5-9.—J. Sherman, Penny Pulpit, No. 1901. Deuteronomy 4:6.—F. W. Farrar, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxii. p. 273.




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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/deuteronomy-3.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 25. That goodly mountain, and Lebanon The French renders this, that goodly mountain, that is to say, Lebanon; c'est a savoir, le Liban. Some commentators suppose mount Moriah, on which the temple was built, to be meant. But there seems no ground for this supposition. A similar mode of expression is found ver. 17 where the plain also, and Jordan, signifies only the plain of Jordan.

See commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

For he supposed God’s threatening might be conditional and reversible, as many others were.

That goodly mountain, or, that blessed mountain, which the Jews not improbably understand of that mountain on which the temple was to be built. For as Moses desired and determined to prepare an habitation for God, Exodus 15:2, and knew very well that God would choose a certain place for his habitation, and to put his name there, Deuteronomy 12:5; so he also knew that it was the manner both of the true worshippers of God and of idolaters to worship their God in high places, and particularly that Abraham did worship God in the mount of Moriah, Genesis 22:2, and therefore did either reasonably conjecture that God would choose some certain mountain for the place of his habitation, or possibly understood by revelation that in that very mount of Moriah, where Abraham performed that eminent and glorious act of worship, there also the children of Abraham should have their place of constant and settled worship. This he seems to call that mountain, emphatically and eminently, that which was much in Moses’s thoughts, though not in his eye, and the blessed (as the Hebrew tob oft signifies) or the goodly mountain. Or, the mountain may be here put for the mountainous countries, as that word is oft used, as Genesis 36:9 Numbers 13:29 23:7 Deuteronomy 1:7 Joshua 10:6 11:16,21, &c. And it is known that a great part of the glory and beauty and profit of this country lay in its hills or mountains. See Deuteronomy 11:11 33:15. And

that goodly mountain may by an enallage of the number be put for those goodly mountains in Canaan, which were many. Thus also he proceeds gradually in this desire and description, and prays that he may see in general the good land that is beyond Jordan, and then particularly the goodly mountains of it, and especially that famous mount of Lebanon, which was so celebrated for its tall and large cedars, and other trees and excellent plants. See Psalms 29:5 104:16 Isaiah 2:13 14:8.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

THE APPOINTMENT OF JOSHUA AS THE SUCCESSOR OF MOSES, Deuteronomy 3:21-29. In Numbers 27:12-23, the death of Moses is foretold, and the appointment and consecration of Joshua related. Moses here reminds the people of this, and tells them that, notwithstanding his prayer that he might go over and see the goodly land, his request is not granted. This prayer of Moses is not mentioned in Numbers. It undoubtedly preceded the request for the appointment of a leader for the congregation.

25. That goodly mountain — Not one particular portion of the Promised Land is referred to, but the whole as a hilly region. As Moses stood on the plains of Moab the land across the Jordan would be to his vision mountainous throughout.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/deuteronomy-3.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Deuteronomy 3:25. Let me go over — For he supposed God’s threatening might be conditional and reversible, as many others were. That goodly mountain — Which the Jews not improbably understood of that mountain on which the temple was to be built. This he seems to call that mountain, emphatically and eminently, that which was much in Moses’s thoughts, though not in his eye.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

I will. Moses flattered himself that God's refusal to let him cross the Jordan, was only conditional; and therefore he begs, with all humility, for leave to enter Chanaan, at the head of the people. But, though God had pardoned his fault, he would not deprive Josue of the honour, which to fulfil the mystery, was reserved for him, Numbers xx. 12., and xxvi. 64. (Calmet) --- Moses might very lawfully desire to behold a place, consecrated by the abode of the Patriarchs, and to be honoured still more by the presence of the Messias, a happiness for which he had been labouring now forty years. (Du Hamel) --- And Libanus. Whether this and be an explanation of what mountain he meant, (Tirinus) is a matter of doubt. He unquestionably desired to see, and to put his people in possession of, all the country designed for their inheritance, in which various fruitful mountains appeared. That of Bethel was very high, and most delightful where Abraham and Jacob had dwelt. Moria and Sion, the future seat of the temple, might also attract his notice, and the mountains of Judea, as well as all the other lofty hills, which diversify the country for Idumea to Libanus. (Haydock) --- Egypt was a flat country. New and grander prospects now open to his view. Libanus is styled Antilibanus by the Septuatint, and by profane authors, as it lies, in effect, to the land of the Hebrews. Behind it Cœlostria extends, as far as Libanus. This mountain comprises four different hills, rising one above another, and taking in a circuit of 300 miles. The first of these hills, Antilibanus, is remarkable for its fertility in corn; the second has abundance of fine springs: but the third resembles an earthly paradise, being constantly adorned with fruits and flowers. Cedars grow chiefly upon the fourth, amidst the snows which lie there perpetually, notwithstanding the burning heats of the adjacent countries. Lebanon signifies both "whiteness and incense," for which it is very renowned. (Calmet) --- De la Roque thinks that it is higher than the Alps or Pyrenees. It stands in the form of a horse-shoe, extending from above Smyrna to Sidon, and thence towards Damascus, (Buffon) unless this be a part of Antilibanus, which runs north, from Damascus, in a parallel direction to Libanus, and includes the hollow Syria. (Haydock) --- Serarius makes these two mountains run eastward, almost from the Mediterranean sea, as Strabo (xvi.) and Ptolemy seem also to do. (Bonfrere)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the good land. Compare Psalms 106:24. Numbers 13:27.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/deuteronomy-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan, that goodly mountain, and Lebanon.

That goodly mountain, and Lebanon. The name Lebanon denotes 'whiteness,' and was given to that gigantic mountain pile either from the chalky colour of its cliffs, or from its summits being capped with perpetual snow. The natural and very earnest wish of Moses to be allowed to cross the Jordan was founded on the idea that the divine threatening might be conditional and reversible. "That goodly mountain" is supposed by Jewish writers to have pointed to the hill on which the temple was to be built (Exodus 15:2), thus making a reference to two mountains-namely, Zion, as "that goodly mountain," and Lebanon. These, if they were both objects of longing desire to Moses, must have excited his interest on different grounds; because he could only look in a prophetic spirit on mount Zion, as to be distinguished for "the glorious things that were to be spoken of it," and on Lebanon, as far-famed for its natural grandeur and productions. But biblical scholars now generally render the words, 'that goodly mountain, even Lebanon,' and consider it to be mentioned as typifying the beauty of Palestine, of which hills and mountains were so prominent a feature.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/deuteronomy-3.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan, that goodly mountain, and Lebanon.
the good land
4:21,22; 11:11,12; Exodus 3:8; Numbers 32:5; Ezekiel 20:6
Lebanon
Lebanon is a long chain of limestone mountains, extending from near the coast of the Mediterranean on the west to the plains of Damascus on the east, and forming the extreme northern boundary of the Holy Land. It is divided into two principal ridges, running parallel to each other in a north-north-east direction; the most westerly of which was properly called Libanus, and the easterly Anti-Libanus: the Hebrews did not make this distinction. It is computed to be fifteen or sixteen hundred fathoms in height. They are by no means barren, but are almost all well cultivated and well peopled; their summits being in many parts level, and forming extensive plains, in which are sown corn and all kinds of pulse. Vineyards, and plantations of olive, mulberry, and fig trees, are also cultivated in terraces formed by walls; and the soil of the declivities and hollows is most excellent, and produces abundance of corn, oil, and wine.

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/deuteronomy-3.html.

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