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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 3:27

 

 

`Go up to the top of Pisgah and lift up your eyes to the west and north and south and east, and see it with your eyes, for you shall not cross over this Jordan.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Get thee up into the top of Pisgah,.... Which was the highest eminence of Mount Nebo, and so a very proper place to take a prospect from; see Deuteronomy 32:49.

and lift up thine eyes westward, and northward, and southward, and eastward; to all the four points of the heaven, and to all the four quarters and borders of the land of Canaan:

and behold it with thine eyes; even the land of Canaan, and particularly Lebanon, though it lay to the north of it, that mountain he had such a desire to see. Moses, though old, his natural sight was very strong, and not in the least dim; and it is not improbable that it might be more than ordinarily increased and assisted at this time:

for thou shall not go over this Jordan; into the land of Canaan; this affair, of not being suffered to enter there, Moses frequently takes notice of, no less than four or five times, it being what lay near his heart.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Get thee up into the top of Pisgah, and l lift up thine eyes westward, and northward, and southward, and eastward, and behold [it] with thine eyes: for thou shalt not go over this Jordan.

(l) As before he saw by the spirits of prophecy the good mountain which was Zion: so here his eyes were lifted up above the order of nature to behold all the plentiful land of Canaan.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1599-1645.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Pisgah; of which see on Numbers 27:12. Lift up thine eyes towards the land of Canaan and its several quarters.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

East. It seems, if Phasga was the eastern boundary of Ruben, (ver. 17,) there was no occasion for Moses to cast his eyes that way. He is ordered to take a full view of the countries allotted by God to the Hebrews; and if we consider that the territory, as far as the Euphrates, was promised to them, if they would continue to be faithful, and that it was made tributary, under Solomon, we need not wonder if Moses should be pleased to behold it, chap. i. 7. (Haydock)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

westward, &c. The points of the compass here are seaward, darkness-ward, Teman-ward, and sunrise-ward. Teman-ward (i.e. south of Edom) first used for south in Exodus 26:18. See Numbers 27:12.

and. Note the Figure of speech Polysyndeton, App-6, emphasizing the extent of the view. not go over. Compare Numbers 27:13.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/deuteronomy-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Get thee up into the top of Pisgah, and lift up thine eyes westward, and northward, and southward, and eastward, and behold it with thine eyes: for thou shalt not go over this Jordan.

Get thee up into the top of Pisgah - (see the note at Deuteronomy 34:1).


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/deuteronomy-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(27) Northward, and southward.—Southward, literally, Teman-ward. The negeb, or “south” of Palestine, is not named here.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Get thee up into the top of Pisgah, and lift up thine eyes westward, and northward, and southward, and eastward, and behold it with thine eyes: for thou shalt not go over this Jordan.
thee up
34:1-4; Numbers 27:12
Pisgah
or, the hill.
lift up
Genesis 13:14,15

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/deuteronomy-3.html.

The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

"Handfuls of Purpose"

For All Gleaners

"Behold... not go."— Deuteronomy 3:27

This was what was to occur in the case of Moses. He was to have a sight of the promised land, but he was not to go into it.—This was no exceptional act on the part of God; on the contrary it is what he is always doing as the ages move onwards.—There are men who see what they will never personally enjoy; and however much their impatience may wish to turn sight into still closer uses, they are filled with ecstatic joy even by the vision of the good things which are yet to come.—In this way we should live in one another and for one another.—Moses could return from the mountain and say that he had seen the good land; even that message would be a comfort to those who were weary, and in whom wonder was fast turning into doubt.—There must always be men in a progressive age who see further than others.—As some see the time when men shall learn war no more.—Others see the time when there will be no need for any man to say to his brother, "Know the Lord," for all shall know him from the least unto the greatest.—This method of divine providence is educational, inasmuch as it shows that not to go does not prevent the enjoyment of the soul in the prospect of realised promises. It is something to submit gracefully to a subordination of the individual, and to accept gladly benefits which are intended for the whole commonwealth.—There is no tone of impatience in the statement of Moses when he hears the Lord"s proposition.—We must accept our place whether we are seers or literal travellers.—It is no small pleasure to see even in dream or in assured hope the beautiful summer which is yet to spread its glories over the whole land.—The enjoyment Isaiah , indeed, intensely spiritual, but not, for that reason, the less real.—Moses may have had a fuller realisation of the promised land than the children of Israel; they had to endure the battle and the fatigue, and to win their way inch by inch: Moses saw the land, and knew that every foot of it would be given to the people whom he had led.—Aged Christians must take this standpoint.—Exhausted ministers must content themselves with the view that is before them, and leave others to secure that view in all its detail and literal value.—The oldest man should have the keenest sight into the beautiful future.—He uses his old age mischievously who uses it as a period of languor or sleep: the oldest man should have the most cheerful voice in the church.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Parker, Joseph. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:27". The People's Bible by Joseph Parker. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jpb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1885-95.

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