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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 3:29

 

 

"So we remained in the valley opposite Beth-peor.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Beth-peor - This was a city in the kingdom of Sihon king of the Amorites; and as בית beth signifies a house, the place probably had its name from a temple of the god Peor, who was worshipped there. Peor was nearly the same among the Moabites that Priapus was among the Romans - the obscene god of an obscene people. This we have already seen.

It is very likely that what God speaks here, both concerning Moses and Joshua, was designed to be typical of the procedure of his justice and grace in the salvation of man.

  1. The land of Canaan was a type of the kingdom of heaven.
  • The law, which shows the holiness of God and the exceeding sinfulness of sin, could not bring the people to the possession of that kingdom.
  • Moses may probably be considered here as the emblem of that law by which is the knowledge of sin, but not redemption from it
  • Joshua, the same as Jesus, the name signifying a Savior, is appointed to bring the people into the rest which God had provided for them; thus it is by Jesus Christ alone that the soul is saved - fitted for and brought into the possession of the heavenly inheritance, (see John 1:17; Galatians 2:16; Galatians 3:12, Galatians 3:13, Galatians 3:24;); for he is the end of the law - the great scope and design of the law, for righteousness - for justification, to them that believe; Romans 10:4. Such a use as this every pious reader may make of the circumstances recorded here, without the danger of pushing analogy or metaphor beyond their reasonable limits.

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    Bibliography
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    Beth-peor, i. e., the house of Peor, no doubt derived its name from a temple of the Moabite god Peor which was there situated. It was no doubt near to Mount Peor Numbers 23:28, and also to the valley of the Jordan perhaps in the Wady Heshban.


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    Bibliography
    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1870.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    So we abode in the valley over against Bethpeor. In the plains of Moab, over against a temple built for Baalpeor upon a mountain, so called from that idol, or that idol from the mountain; this is the valley where Moses was buried, Deuteronomy 34:6.


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    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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    Bibliography
    Gill, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1999.

    Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

    REFLECTIONS

    AMIDST the various improvements which the perusal of this Chapter opens to my view, under the teaching of GOD the HOLY GHOST, while I behold, as in the case of the kings of Sihon and Bashan, that giants are but as dwarfs when GOD fights the battles of his people; and that, while going forth in the strength of the LORD GOD, making mention of his righteousness, even his only, I shall be more than conqueror through him that loveth me: let me desire like Moses, with an eye of faith, to see that goodly land, and yet more especially JESUS, the LORD of it, who is the greater Joshua, gone before to take possession of it in the name of all his people. Oh! thou LORD of the country, and of the true tabernacle, which our GOD hath pitched and not man, grant, by the influences of thy HOLY SPIRIT, that my soul may be ever longing, until faith is realized in vision, for the view of thee, and of thy glory. May my soul contemplate now by faith all ordinances, means of grace, and every institution of service, as pointing to thy Person, and having their consummation in thee; and when thou shalt give the order for my dismission from this region of shadows, LORD grant that I may awake up after thy likeness, to be fully satisfied with thee.


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    Bibliography
    Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1828.

    Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

    Ver. 29. So we abode in the valley over against Beth-peor Beth-peor was one of those cities in the plains of Moab, which were given to the tribe of Reuben. The Israelites continued encamped in this valley from their conquest of the kingdoms of Sihon and Og, till their passage over Jordan, under the conduct of Joshua, after the death of Moses, who was buried in this valley, see chap. Deuteronomy 34:6.


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    Bibliography
    Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1801-1803.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    The house or temple of Peor, or of Baal-Peor, of which see Numbers 25:3, whence this place or city had its name.


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    Bibliography
    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1685.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    29. So we abode in the valley — Here the people were encamped a long time. The transactions related in Numbers 28-34 took place here. Here these discourses of Moses were spoken. Near this spot he was buried.

    Beth-peor — See on Numbers 23:28.


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    Bibliography
    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/deuteronomy-3.html. 1874-1909.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    Phogor. Hebrew Beth pehor, "the house, temple, or city of Phogor," where that idol was the object of adoration. The city was probably at the foot of Mount Phasga, and fell to the share of Ruben, Josue xiii. 20. (Calmet) --- The Hebrews dwelt in the valley when Moses made the aforesaid supplication to God, and was ordered to desist; and, after taking a view of the promised land, to give the necessary instructions to his successor, ver. 23. (Haydock) --- Perhaps this might take place before the defeat of the two kings. (Calmet)


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    Bibliography
    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1859.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    Beth-peor = the house (or temple) of Peor, where Baal was worshipped (Numbers 23:28; Numbers 25:3. Numbers 4:3, Here Moses was buried (Deuteronomy 34:6). It was a Moabite holy place (Numbers 25:18; Numbers 25:31, Numbers 25:16. Joshua 22:17). Allotted to Reuben (Joshua 13:20).


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    Bibliography
    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/deuteronomy-3.html. 1909-1922.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (29) So we abode in the valley over against Beth-peor.—Moses’ burial-place, as appears by Deuteronomy 34:6. It is a significant finishing touch to the scene described above. This verse also concludes the recapitulation of Israel’s journey from Horeb (Deuteronomy 1:6) to the banks of Jordan, with which this first discourse of Moses begins. The remainder, contained in Deut. Iv., is the practical part of the discourse, which now begins.


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    These files are public domain.
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    Bibliography
    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    So we abode in the valley over against Bethpeor.
    4:3,46; 34:6; Numbers 25:3; 33:48,49

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    Bibliography
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/deuteronomy-3.html.

    The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

    "Handfuls of Purpose"

    For All Gleaners

    "So we abode in the valley."— Deuteronomy 3:29

    Places have moral interest.—Sometimes the valley is in the highland, and is therefore only a valley relatively: as compared with valleys far away down it may actually be a very high mountain.—The lesson we have to learn is to abide in the place assigned by Providence.—There is a subtle tone of submission and patience in the text. There is no complaining as to the lot.—The valley is accepted as a sanctuary. It was a valley of God"s making, and therefore was to be regarded as a place on which he had expended special care.—In the valley we may have shelter.—In the valley we may have harvests.—In the valley we may have security.—It is the business of the Christian to discover the advantages of his position rather than to moan over its disadvantages.—There is another valley in which we shall not abide, but shall pass through it under the comfort of the rod and the staff of the divine Shepherd.—Some persons seem never to get out of the valley; they literally abide in it as men abide in a home.—Who are we that we should chide the Providence which has made such appointments? How do we know how much the dwellers in the valley are saved from? Who can tell what compensations fall to their lot?—The text is not supposed to teach the kind of contentment which it is almost impossible to distinguish from indifference. Such contentment is no virtue. The true contentment is that which accepts the hard lot without repining, knowing that God has some good purpose in its appointment, and assured that even the hardest position may be turned to noble uses.—When our superiors attempt to keep us in the valley we may well inquire as to their authority: when God means us to abide in the valley we may be sure that he will not forsake us in our lowest estate.


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    Bibliography
    Parker, Joseph. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:29". The People's Bible by Joseph Parker. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jpb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1885-95.

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