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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 3:9

 

 

(Sidonians call Hermon Sirion, and the Amorites call it Senir):

Adam Clarke Commentary

Hermon the Sidonians call - Shenir - I suppose this verse to have been a marginal remark, which afterwards got incorporated with the text, or an addition by Joshua or Ezra.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Hermon, the southern and culminating point of the range of Lebanon, was also the religious center of primaeval Syria. Its Baal sanctuaries not only existed but gave it a name before the Exodus. Hence, the careful specification of the various names by which the mountain was known. The Sidonian name of it might easily have become known to Moses through the constant traffic which had gone on from the most ancient times between Sidon and Egypt.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Which Hermon the Sidonians call Sirion,.... Which name it has in Psalm 29:6 a name the inhabitants of Sidon gave it, but for what reason it is not easy to say; however, that it was well known to Tyre and Sidon, appears from snow in summer time being brought to the former, as will be hereafter observed:

and the Amorites call it Shenir; in whose possession it was last. BochartF11Hierozoic. par. 1. l. 3. c. 14. col. 865. thinks it had its name from the multitude of wild cats in it, Shunar in the Chaldee tongue being the name of that creature; but Jarchi says Shenir in the Canaanitish language signifies "snow"; so, in the Targums of Onkelos and Jonathan, it is called the mountain of snow; and the Hebrew who read to Jerom, and taught him, affirmed to him that this mountain hung over Paneas, from whence snow in summer time was brought to Tyre for pleasureF12De loc. Heb. fol. 88. B, C. , and the same is confirmed by AbulfedaF13Apud Reland. Palestin. Illustrat. par. 2. p. 920. . There is said to be upon the top of it a famous temple, which is used for worship by the Heathens, over against Paneas and LebanonF14De loc. Heb. fol. 88. B, C. ; and it is highly probable there was one even at this time, when it was possessed by the Amorites, since it is called Mount Baalhermon, Judges 3:3, from the worship of Baal, or some other idol upon it, as it should seem. Besides these, it had another name, Mount Sion, Deuteronomy 4:48 but to be distinguished from Mount Zion near Jerusalem. The names of it in this place are very differently interpreted by HillerusF15Onomastic. Sacr. p. 561, 562, 786, 929. ; though he thinks it had them all on account of the snow on it, which was as a net all over it; for Hermon, he observes, signifies a net, a dragnet, and Shenir an apron, and Sirion a coat of mail, all from the covering of this mount with snow.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Hermon — now Jebel-Es-Sheick - the majestic hill on which the long and elevated range of Anti-Lebanon terminates. Its summit and the ridges on its sides are almost constantly covered with snow. It is not so much one high mountain as a whole cluster of mountain peaks, the highest in Palestine. According to the survey taken by the English Government Engineers in 1840, they were about 9376 feet above the sea. Being a mountain chain, it is no wonder that it should have received different names at different points from the different tribes which lay along the base - all of them designating extraordinary height: Hermon, the lofty peak; “Sirion,” or in an abbreviated form “Sion” (Deuteronomy 4:48), the upraised, glittering; “Shenir,” the glittering breastplate of ice.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/deuteronomy-3.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

(Which Hermon the Sidonians call Sirion; and the Amorites call it Shenir;)

Sirion — Elsewhere called Mount Gilead, and Lebanon, and here Shenir, and Sirion, which several names are given to this one mountain partly by several people, and partly in regard of several tops and parts of it.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/deuteronomy-3.html. 1765.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 9. Which Hermon the Sidonians call Sirion Sirion signifies a mountain. Now as Hermon, one of the mountains of Gilead, where it joins to Lebanon, rises in the territories of the Sidonians, they term it the mountain, by way of eminence: it is called by this name, Psalms 29:6. The Amorites call it Shenir, it is added; from the wild cats which abounded in this mountain, Bochart conjectures, for Sinar, in Arabic, is the name of that animal: or, perhaps, it might come from Seir or Sera; which, says Le Clerc, signifies a mountain, in Arabic; from whence the Spaniards have borrowed the name Sierra. See Bochart's Canaan, lib. 2: cap. 11.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Elsewhere called Mount Gilead, and Libanus or Lebanon, and here

Shenir, and Sirion, and, by abbreviation, Sion, Deuteronomy 4:48; which several names are given to this one mountain, partly by several people, and partly in regard of several tops and parts of it, whence

Shenir and Hermon are mentioned as distinct places, Song of Solomon 4:8.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1685.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Deuteronomy 3:9. Sirion — Elsewhere called mount Gilead, and Lebanon, and here Shenir, and Sirion, which several names were given to this one mountain, partly by several people, and partly in regard of several tops and parts of it.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Which. Note these topographical parentheses, verses: Deuteronomy 3:9, Deuteronomy 3:11, Deuteronomy 3:14, Compare Deuteronomy 2:20-23, Deuteronomy 2:29.

Sirion = breastplate.

Shenir = coat of mail.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/deuteronomy-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

(Which Hermon the Sidonians call Sirion; and the Amorites call it Shenir;)

No JFB commentary on this verse.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/deuteronomy-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) Sirion.—(Sion,Deut.448.) Sirion, or Shirion, and Shenir, are thought to have similar meanings. But the Targum inteprets Shenir as the “rock of snow.” Shirion, according to Gesenius, means “glittering like a breastplate.” It would not be safe to assert that the mention of the Sidonian name of Hermon makes this verse an addition after Israel was in Palestine, though it might be so. The Jewish commentator Rashi points out that, including the name Sion (Deuteronomy 4:48), “this mountain has four names. Why mention them? To declare the praise of the land of Israel, which had four kingdoms glorifying themselves in it, and each of them saying, ‘It is called after my name!’” But there are several notes of this kind in the Pentateuch. (See Genesis 23:2; Genesis 31:47; Numbers 13:22; also Joshua 14:15.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/deuteronomy-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

(Which Hermon the Sidonians call Sirion; and the Amorites call it Shenir;)
Hermon
Mount Hermon is the south-eastern branch of Lebanon, beyond Jordan. The Chaldee Targumist, who places it at Cæsarea and Samaritan interpreter call it toor talga, "the mountain of snow," because of its being always covered with snow; and Jerome informs us, that it lies higher than Paneas or Cæsarea Philippi, and that in the summer time snow used to be carried from thence to Tyre. It is now call El Heish, and is comprised in the district of Kanneytra.
4:48,49; Psalms 29:6; 89:12; 133:3; Song of Solomon 4:8
Shenir
1 Chronicles 5:23; Ezekiel 27:5
Senir

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 3:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/deuteronomy-3.html.

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