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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Habakkuk 1:11

 

 

"Then they will sweep through like the wind and pass on. But they will be held guilty, They whose strength is their god."

Adam Clarke Commentary

Then shall his mind change - This is thought to relate to the change which took place in Nebuchadnezzar, when "a beast's heart was given to him," and he was "driven from the dwellings of men." And this was because of his offending - his pride and arrogance; and his attributing all his success, etc., to his idols.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/habakkuk-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Then shall his mind change - or, better, “Then he sweeps by, חלף châlaph is used of the overflowing of a river, Isaiah 8:8, of a wind chasing, Isaiah 21:1, of the invisible presence of God passing by, Job 9:11, or a spirit, Job 4:15, of the swift passing of our days, like ship or eagle, Isaiah 2:18, of rain past and gone, Isaiah 24:5. It is always intransitive, except as piercing the temples of man Judges 5:26, or himself Job 20:24.

A wind - רוח rûach metaphor for simile, as Psalm 11:1; Psalm 22:14; (13English) Psalm 90:4; Job 24:5; Isaiah 51:12)

And passes - עבר ‛âbar “pass over” (with חלף châlaph as here,), Isaiah 8:8; Nahum 1:8; Habakkuk 3:10; “transgress,” passim; “pass away,” Psalm 37:6; Job 34:29; Nahum 1:12)

And is guilty; this his strength is his god - The victory was completed, all resistance ended. He sweeps by, as his own Euphrates, when over-filled by the swelling Isaiah 8:8 of all its tributary streams, riseth up over all its banks, and overwhelms all where it passes; as a wind which sweepeth Isaiah 21:1 over the desert: and passes over all bounds and laws, human and divine, and is guilty and stands guilty before God, making himself as God.

This his power is his god - God had said to Israel Exodus 6:7, “I will be to thee God.” The Chaldaean virtually said, “this my strength is to me my god.” This Nebuchadnezzars own words speak Daniel 4:30; “Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of the kingdom by the might of my power, and for the honor of my majesty?” And the statue which was to be worshipped, was, very probably, of himself, as the intoxication of pride has made other pagan kings or conquerors, Alexander or Darius. Belshazzar said Isaiah 14:14, “I will be like the Most High,” and the prince of Tyre said Ezekiel 28:2, “I am a god, and antichrist shall “exalt himself above all that is called god, and, as God, sit in the temple of God, shewing himself that he is god” 2 Thessalonians 2:4. Such is all pride. It sets itself in the place of God, it ceases to think of itself as God‘s instrument, and so becomes a god to itself, as though its eminence and strength were its own, and its wisdom were the source of its power (See Ezekiel 28:2-5), and its will the measure of its greatness. The words, with a divine fullness, express severally, that the king Shall sweep along, shall pass over all bounds and all hindrances, and shall pass away, shall be guilty and shall bear his guilt; and so they comprise in one his sin and his punishment, his greatness and his fall. And so, 40 years afterward Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 5:19-20. “whom he would, he slew; and whom he would, he kept alive; and whom he would, he set up; and whom he would, he put down; but when his heart was lifted up, and his mind hardened in pride, he was deposed from his kingly throne, and they took his glory from him;” Daniel 4:31, “there fell a voice from heaven, The kingdom is departed from thee; and Belshazzar; Daniel 5:23, Daniel 5:30, “in the same night that he lifted up himself against the Lord of heaven, was slain.”


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/habakkuk-1.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Then shall he sweep by as a wind, and shall pass over, and be guilty, even he whose might is his god."

This prophecy, by extension, was applicable to the great Sea-Beast, and to all of its seven heads, and to each of the powers in the phase of the ten horns that came after the heads. It must ever be a part of the eternal will of God that godless states of this world, arrayed in arrogance against the God of heaven and earth, shall one by one fill up the cup of wrath and suffer the fate of all their predecessors.

"Sweep by as a wind, and shall pass over..." This is the destiny of every godless state. No matter how long and terrible may be their sway upon earth, no matter what powers and fortification sustain them, no matter how many millions of their fellow-human beings are subjugated and exploited by them, they shall eventually be "Gone with the Wind." They shall pass over the earth, all right but they shall have no permanence. Like a bad dream, they will eventually "pass over."

"Shall pass over and be guilty ..." According to Jamieson, there is indicated in this passage a "change of mind" on the part of the new world-power.

"The language here is very similar to that describing Nebuchadnezzar's `change' from man's heart to the heart of a beast, because of pride (Daniel 4:16,30-34). This was an undesigned coincidence between the two sacred books written independently."[23]

Thus, the enigmatical element in all genuine prophecy appears in this most remarkable intimation of what would befall Babylon and Nebuchadnezzar. All true prophecy, upon its fulfillment, exhibits such intimations which would have been understood, prior to fulfillment, in a secondary or subordinate sense, but which, after fulfillment, are understood more fully as the most remarkable pre-knowledge of some of the world's most astounding and significant events. This enigmatical reference to what happened to Nebuchadnezzar is an example.

"Whose might is his god ..." This was the culmination of guilt on the part of Babylon, which would, in turn bring the wrath and destruction of God upon them, no less than upon Assyria and Egypt, their predecessors, and upon all their successors who would become enemies of the Lord. (See more on this thought under Habakkuk 1:16, below.)


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/habakkuk-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then shall his mind change,.... The mind of the king of Babylon; not that, when he had taken Jerusalem, he altered his purpose, and laid aside his designs of attacking other nations, and returned to his own country; where he became guilty of gross idolatry, in setting up the golden image in the plain of Dura, which he required all his subjects to worship, and to which he ascribed all his victories; for, five years after this, JosephusF23Antiqu. l. 10. c. 9. sect. 7. says, he led his army into Coelesyria, and conquered the Moabites and Ammonites, and entered Egypt, and slew the reigning king of it: but rather the disposition of his mind changed for the worse upon his success in subduing kings and princes, and their kingdoms; for though his mind was never good, but always proud, haughty, and ambitious, insolent, cruel, and tyrannical; yet, being flushed with his conquests, he grew more and more so:

and he shall pass overF24יעבר "transgredietur", Pagninus, Vatablus, Calvin, Drusius, Tarnovius. , or "transgress", all bounds of modesty and sobriety, of humanity and goodness:

and offend, imputing this his power unto his godF25זו כוחו לאלוהו "iste est, ejus robur fuit pro deo ejus", Gussetius. ; this particularly will be the sin he will be guilty of, he will ascribe all his achievements to his idol Bel; or rather to himself, to his own prowess and valour, his wisdom and skill in military affairs; for so it will bear to be rendered, making "this his own power to be his god"; and perhaps the golden image Nebuchadnezzar set up to be worshipped was for himself; see Daniel 4:30. The Targum is,

"therefore, because of the lifting up of his spirit, his kingdom was removed from him; and he committed an offence, in that he multiplied glory to his idol;'

and some interpret the whole of this of the miserable condition Nebuchadnezzar was brought into, being a prophecy of it: "then shall his mind change"; his heart from man's to a beast's, Daniel 4:16, "and he shall pass over"; from all society and conversation with men, and have his dwelling with beasts, Daniel 4:31, "and offend", or rather "be punished", and become desolate and miserable, for his pride, and idolatry, and other sins: "this his power" is "his god"F26"Tune immutatus est spiritu, et transiit et desolatus est, hoc robur ejus est dei ejus", De Dieu. ; spoken ironically; see what his power is now, being changed into a beast, which he reckoned his god, or gloried in as what he had from his god: but I rather think the whole is a continuation of his success, particularly in the land of Judea; and to be rendered, "then shall he pass through, as the wind, and shall pass over; and he shall bear the punishment of his sin, whose power is his god"; that is, the king of Babylon and his army, the Chaldeans, should pass through all nations and kingdoms that were between them and Judea, like a strong wind or whirlwind, to which they are compared, Jeremiah 4:13 and carry all before them, none being able to resist and oppose them; and should pass over rivers that lay in their way, and the boundaries of Judea, and spread themselves over the whole country; and then that country, and the inhabitants of it, should be punished for their sins, particularly for their confidence in themselves; in their wealth and riches; in their fortresses and strong towers; in their own works of righteousness; all which they made idols of, and trusted not in their God, as they ought to have done.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/habakkuk-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Then shall [his] mind change, and he shall i pass over, and offend, [imputing] this his power to his god.

(i) The Prophet comforts the faithful that God will also destroy the Babylonians, because they will abuse this victory, and become proud and insolent, attributing the praise of this to their idols.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/habakkuk-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Then — when elated by his successes.

shall his mind change — He shall lose whatever of reason or moderation ever was in him, with pride.

he shall pass over — all bounds and restraints: his pride preparing the sure way for his destruction (Proverbs 16:18). The language is very similar to that describing Nebuchadnezzar‘s “change” from man‘s heart (understanding) to that of a beast, because of pride (see on Daniel 4:16; see on Daniel 4:30, Daniel 4:31; see on Daniel 4:33, Daniel 4:34). An undesigned coincidence between the two sacred books written independently.

imputing this his power unto his god — (Daniel 5:4). Sacrilegious arrogance, in ascribing to his idol Bel the glory that belongs to God [Calvin]. Grotius explains, “(saying that) his power is his own as one who is a god to himself” (compare Habakkuk 1:16, and Daniel 3:1-30). So Maurer, “He shall offend as one to whom his power is his god” (Job 12:6; see on Micah 2:1).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/habakkuk-1.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The Prophet now begins to give some comfort to the faithful, lest they should succumb under so grievous evils. He has hitherto directed his discourse to that irreclaimable people, but he now turns to the remnant; for there were always among them some of the faithful, though few, whom God never neglected; yea, for their sake often he sent his prophets; for though the multitude derived no benefit, yet the faithful understood that God did not threaten in vain, and were thus retained in his fear. This was the reason why the prophets were wont, after having spoken generally, to come down to the faithful, and as it were to comfort them apart and privately. And this difference ought to be noticed, as we have said elsewhere; for when the prophets denounce God’s wrath, the discourse then is directed indiscriminately to the whole body of the people; but when they add promises, it is then as though they called the faithful to a private conference, and spake in their ear what had been committed to them by the Lord. The truth might have been useful to all, had they returned to a right mind; but as almost the whole people had hardened themselves in their vices, and as Satan had rendered stupid the minds and hearts of nearly all, it behaved the Prophet to have a special regard to the chosen of God. We now then apprehend his design.

And he says—now he will change his spirit. He bids the faithful to entertain hope, because the Chaldeans, after having poured forth all their fury, will be punished by the Lord for their arrogance, for it will be intolerable. This may indeed seem frigid to ungodly men; for what wonder is it that the Chaldeans, after having obtained so many victories, should grow haughty and exult in their success, as is commonly the case? But as this is a fixed principle with us, that men’s pride becomes intolerable to God when they extremely exult and preserve no moderation—this is a very powerful argument—that is, that whosoever thus raises his horns shall suddenly be laid prostrate by the Lord. And Scripture also ever sets this before us, that God beats down supercilious pride, and does this that we may know that destruction is nigh all the ungodly, when they thus grow violently mad, and know not that they are mortals. It was then for this reason that the Prophet mentions what he says here; it was that the faithful might hope for some end to the violence of their enemies, for God would check their pride when they should transgress. But he says—then He will change his spirit; not that there was before any humility in the Chaldeans, but that success inebriated them, yea, and deprived them of all reason. And it is a common thing that a person who has fortune as it were in his hand, forgets himself, and thinks himself no longer a mortal. Great kings do indeed confess that they are men; but we see how madness lays hold on them; for, as I have said, being deluded by prosperity, they deem themselves to be nothing less than gods.

The Prophet refers here to the king of Babylon and all his people. He will change, he says, his spirit; that is, success will take away from him whatever reason and moderation he had. Now since the proud betray themselves and their disposition when fortune smiles on them, let us learn to form our judgement of men according to this experiment. If we would judge rightly of any man we must see how he bears good and bad fortune; for it may be that he who has borne adversity with a patient, calm and resigned mind, will disappoint us in prosperity, and will so elate himself as to be wholly another man. The Prophet then does not without reason speak of a change of spirit; for though the Chaldeans were before proud, they were not so extremely haughty as when their pride passed all bounds, after their many victories. He will change then his spirit; not that the Chaldeans were another kind of people, but that the Lord thus discovered their madness which was before hid.

He then adds—he will pass over. The Prophet intended to express that when the Lord suffered the Chaldeans to rule far and wide, a way was thus opened for his judgements, which is far different from the judgement of the flesh. For the more power men acquire the more boldness they assume; and it seemed to tend to the establishing of their power that they knew how to use their success. But the Lord, as I have said, was secretly preparing a way to destroy them, when they thus became proud and passed all bounds; hence the Prophet does not simply condemn the haughtiness and pride of the Chaldeans, but shows that a way is already open, as it were, for God’s judgement, that he might destroy them, inasmuch as they would render themselves intolerable.

He afterwards adds—and shall act impiously. The verb אשם, ashem I refer to the end of the verse—where he ascribes his power to his own god. And the Prophet adds this explanation, in order that the Jews might know what kind of sin would be the sin of the king of Babylon. He then charges him with sacrilege, because he would think that he had become the conqueror of Judea through the kindness of his idol, so that he would make nothing of the power and glory of the true God. Since then the Babylonian would transfer God’s glory to his own idol, his own ruin would be thus made ripe; for the Lord would undertake his own cause, and execute vengeance on such a sacrilege; for he speaks here no doubt of the Babylonian, and according to his view, when he says—

This his strength is that of his god; but were any inclined to explain this of the true God, as some do, he would make a harsh and a forced construction; for the Babylonians did not worship the true God, but were devoted, as it is well known, to their own superstitions. The Prophet then no doubt makes known here to the faithful the pride with which the Babylonians would become elated, and thus provoke God’s wrath against themselves; and also the sacrilegious boasting in which they would indulge, ascribing the victories given them to their own idols, which could not be done without daring reproach to the true God. (16) It now follows—

The best exposition of the last clause is what Grotius has suggested, and has been followed by Marckius and Dathius —that the Chaldeans made their own strength their God; (see verse 16;) the rendering then would be this,—

hen will it renew courage, And pass through,
and become guilty; —This is strength being its god,
or literally, This is strength for its god.

There is an inconsistency in our version, and also in Calvin, as to this passage, from verse 6 to the end of this verse. The number is changed. The “bitter nation,” mentioned in verse 6, is meant throughout; and we ought to adopt the plural number throughout, as Newcome does, or, according to Henderson, the singular. There is no change of person, as some suppose, at the beginning of verse 10; for [ הוא ], there, and [ הוא ] in verse 6 is the same—the “bitter nation.”—Ed.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/habakkuk-1.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Habakkuk 1:11 Then shall [his] mind change, and he shall pass over, and offend, [imputing] this his power unto his god.

Ver. 11. Then shall his mind change] For the worse, in peius proficiet; his good and his blood shall rise together, as the proverb hath it; he shall be puffed up with his victories.

Luxuriant animi rebus plerunque secundis.

Pride compasseth prosperous persons as a chain, Psalms 73:5-6, Job 15:25-27; their hearts are lifted up with their successes, as a boat that riseth with the rising of the water. Evagrius noteth it for a special commendation of Mauricius the emperor, that notwithstanding his great prosperity he retained his ancient piety.

And he shall pass over] Or transgress all the bounds of modesty. Pride was anciently portrayed with three crowns on her head. Upon the first was written Transcendo, upon the second Non obedio, upon the third Perturbo. David calleth wicked men effractores, breachmakers.

And offend, imputing this his power to his god] Bel, or Jupiter Belus. This was a wickedness with a witness; thus to transfer the glory of victory due to God alone upon an idol. When Nebuchadnezzar offended in this sort God turned him a grazing till he had learned better, Daniel 4:37. For, be the gods of the heathen good fellows, saith one; the true God is a jealous God, and will not share his glory with another, Isaiah 42:8.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/habakkuk-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Habakkuk 1:11. Then, &c.— Then shall his spirit be changed, and he shall depart, and become guilty, who confided in his god. The prophet here foretels the wonderful change which was to happen to Nebuchadnezzar; who was to have the heart of a beast, and to become guilty; to be punished for his pride, to depart from his palace, and to dwell in the fields. See Houbigant.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/habakkuk-1.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Then: it notes both the time and cause of what happened; extraordinary successes, and a continued series of them, attending the designs and attempts of the Chaldean kings, at last made them so haughty and proud, as to trample on kings, Habakkuk 1:10; and when their pride was at this height, it stops not here.

His mind; the spirit or wind, as the Hebrew, and so some think the prophet does foretell the change of his prosperous gales, his downfall; but it is more natural to understand it of the change of mind in the prosperous Chaldean, he will think other thoughts of himself. his affairs, and of other men.

He shall pass over; break over the bounds of all sober and modest sentiments, exceed in his value of himself, and of his achievements, as Sennacherib first did, 2 Chronicles 32:17-19, and next Nebuchadnezzar, surnamed the Great, Daniel 4:29,30.

Offend: this pride was a great sin, and highly provoked God; for the insolent tyrant idolized himself.

Imputing this his power, the strength by which he had done all this great exploits, or the might and power to which he had advanced himself, unto

his god: this at first seems a little tolerable, it seems to savour somewhat of religion, yet it is a great offence thus to ascribe his grandeur to a dumb idol, but it is worse to reckon his strength to be his god, as the words will express it in the Hebrew. See Daniel 4:29,30.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/habakkuk-1.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Babylonians would sweep through the ancient Near East like the wind and pass on from one doomed nation to the next. Yet Yahweh promised to hold them guilty because they worshipped power instead of the true God. This is the reason God would judge them.

God may seem to be strangely silent and inactive in provocative circumstances. He sometimes gives unexpected answers to our prayers. And He sometimes uses strange instruments to correct His people. [Note: See D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones, From Fear to Faith: Studies in the Book of Habakkuk and the Problem of History, pp15-18.]


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/habakkuk-1.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Spirit; viz., the spirit of the king of Babylon. It alludes to the judgment of God upon Nabuchodonosor, recorded [in] Daniel iv., and to the speedy fall of the Chaldean empire. (Challoner) --- It shall yield to the Medes, &c., after conquering the Assyrians. (Worthington) --- Fall. Hebrew, "sin." Septuagint, "obtain pardon." --- God: "idol," Chaldean. "This is the strength of my God," Septuagint. God forced the proud king to confess that his great exploits were not to be attributed to himself or to idols. (Haydock)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/habakkuk-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

mind = spirit. Hebrew. ruach. App-9.

over = through.

god. Hebrew. "eloah (App-4. V): i.e. his object of worship.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/habakkuk-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then shall his mind change, and he shall pass over, and offend, imputing this his power unto his god.

Then - when elated by his successes.

Shall his mind change - he shall lose whatever of reason or moderation ever was in him, with pride.

And he shall pass over - all bounds and restraints: his pride preparing the sure way for his destruction (Proverbs 16:18). The language is very similar to that describing Nebuchadnezzar's "change" from "man's heart" (understanding) to that of a "beast," because of pride (Daniel 4:16; Daniel 4:30-34; see notes there). An undesigned coincidence between the two sacred books, written independently.

And offend, imputing this his power unto his god - (Daniel 5:4). Sacrilegious arrogance, in ascribing to his idol, Bel, the glory that belongs to God (Calvin). Grotius explains, '(saying that) his power is his own, as one who is a god to himself,' (cf. Habakkuk 1:16; and Daniel 3:1-30.) So Maurer, 'He shall offend as one to whom his power is his god' (note, Job 12:6, 'who make a god of their own hand;' Micah 2:1, "They practice it (iniquity), because it is in the power of their hand").


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/habakkuk-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) Then shall his mind change. . . .—Better, Then he sweeps by like a wind and passes. But he is guilty, making this his strength his god. By an abrupt transition the latter half of the verse diverts our attention from the human view of the world-conqueror to his appearance in God’s sight. Men only see an irresistible force sweeping over the face of the earth like a whirlwind; here to-day, and to-morrow nothing but devastation and ruin to testify to its visit. And men are dazzled by this mighty display of power. But, even as Daniel at Belshazzar’s feast, Habakkuk pronounces the oppressor’s doom in the very hour of triumph. The description of the irresistible invader drops into the sudden depths of anti-climax, “But he is (counted) guilty.” His guilt consists just in what men deem so glorious, in his self-reliant irresponsible pursuit of grandeur. The brute force of armaments is the supreme deity of the Chaldæan. His sword and spear are, as it were, his idols. (Comp. Habakkuk 1:16.) God, in whose hands his breath is, and whose are all his ways, has he not glorified. (Comp. Daniel 5:23.) Therefore that God shall bring on him ruin and ignominy, and the very nations which have marvelled at his prowess shall taunt and contemn him (Habakkuk 2:6). Here, then, is the key-note of so much of the second canto (Habakkuk 1:12 to 2 fin.) as relates to the downfall of the invader.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/habakkuk-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then shall his mind change, and he shall pass over, and offend, imputing this his power unto his god.
shall his
Daniel 4:30-34
imputing
Daniel 5:3,4,20

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/habakkuk-1.html.

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