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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Habakkuk 1:2

 

 

How long, O LORD, will I call for help, And You will not hear? I cry out to You, "Violence!" Yet You do not save.

Adam Clarke Commentary

O Lord, how long shall I cry - The prophet feels himself strongly excited against the vices which he beheld; and which, it appears from this verse, he had often declaimed against, but in vain; the people continued in their vices, and God in his longsuffering.

Habakkuk begins his prophecy under a similar feeling, and nearly in similar words, as Juvenal did his Satires: -

Semper ego auditor tantum?

Nunquamne reponam?

Vexatus toties rauci Theseide Codri?

Sat. 1:1.

"Shall I always be a hearer only?

Shall I never reply?

So often vexed?"

Of violence - The most unlawful and outrageous acts.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/habakkuk-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

O Lord, how long shall I cry - Literally, “how long have I cried so intensely to Thee?” Because it is always the cry of the creature to the One who alone can hear or help - its God. Of this cry the Prophet expresses that it had already lasted long. In that long past he had cried out to God but no change had come. There is an undefined past, and this still continues.

How long - as Asaph cries, “how long hast Thou been,” and, it is implied, wilt Thou be “wroth against the prayer of Thy people?” as we should say,” how long shall Thy wrath continue?” The words which the prophet uses relate to domestic strife and wrong between man and man; violence, iniquity, strife, contention Habakkuk 1:3, nor are any of them used only of the oppression of a foreign enemy. Also, Habakkuk complains of injustice too strong for the law, and the perversion of justice Habakkuk 1:4. And upon this, the sentence is pronounced. The enemy is to be sent for judgment and correction Habakkuk 1:12. They are then the sins of Judah which the prophet rehearses before God, in fellow-suffering with the oppressed. God answers that they shall be removed, but by the punishment of the sinners.

Punishment does not come without sin, nor does sin endure without punishment. It is one object of the Old Testament to exhibit the connection between sin and punishment. Other prophets, as commissioned by God, first denounced the sins and then foretold the punishment of the impenitent. Habakkuk appeals to God‘s justice, as requiring its infliction. On this ground too this opening of the prophecy cannot be a complaint against the Chaldees, because their wrong would be no ground of the punishment which the prophet denounced, but the punishment itself, requiting wrong to man through human wrong.

Cyril: “The prophet considers the person of the oppressed, enduring the intolerable insolence and contumely of those accustomed to do wrong, and very skillfully doth he attest the unutterable lovingkindness of God, for he exhibits Him as very forbearing, though accustomed to hate wickedness, but that He doth not immediately bring judgment upon the offenders, he showed clearly, saying that so great is His silence and long-suffering, that there needeth a strong cry, in that some practice intolerable covetousness against others, and use an unbridled insolence against the weak, for his very complaints of God‘s endurance of evil attest the immeasurable loving kindness of God.”

Cyril: “You may judge hence of the hatred of evil among the saints. For they speak of the woes of others as their own. So saith the most wise Paul 2 Corinthians 11:29, who is weak and I am not weak? who is offended, and I burn not? and bade us Romans 12:15 weep with those who weep, showing that sympathy and mutual love are especially becoming to the saints.”

The prophet, through sympathy or fellow-suffering with the sufferers, is as one of them. He cries for help, as himself needing it, and being in the misery, in behalf of which he prays. He says, “How long shall I cry?” standing, as it were, in the place of all, and gathering all their cries into one, and presenting them before God. It is the cry, in one, of all which is wronged to the God of Justice, of all suffering to the God of love. “When shall this scene of sin, and confusion, and wrong be at an end, and the harmony of God‘s creation be restored? How long shall evil not exist only, but prevail?” It is the cry of the souls under the altar Revelation 6:10, “How long, O Lord, Holy and True, dost Thou not judge and avenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth?” It is the voice of the oppressed against the oppressor; of the Church against the world; weary of hearing the Lord‘s Name blasphemed, of seeing wrong set up on high, of holiness trampled underfoot. It is in its highest sense His Voice, who, to sanctify our longings for deliverance, said in the days of His Flesh Psalm 22:2, “I cry in the daytime, but Thou hearest not.”

Even cry out - aloud (it is the cry of anguish) Dion.: “We cry the louder, the more we cry from the heart, even without words; for not the moving of the lips, but the love of the heart sounds in the ears of God.”

Even cry out unto Thee. - Whether as an exclamation or a continuance of the question, How long? The prophet gathered in one the prolonged cry of past and future. He had cried out; he should cry on, “Violence.” He speaks as if the one word, jerked out, as it were, wrung forth from his inmost soul, was, “Violence,” as if he said this one word to the God of justice and love.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/habakkuk-1.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Habakkuk 1:2

O Lord! how long shall I cry, and Thou wilt not hear?

The crisis of prayer

The question to be answered is this: How long will God suffer His people to pray, and still neglect to hear? Answer--

1. Till they see the plague of their own hearts--till each one sees his own individual iniquities, and lies in the dust before God.

2. Till the Church feels that she stands in the gap between God and a sin destroyed world.

3. Till they are willing to do whatever of duty He requires, in addition to praying.

4. Till they move the stumbling-blocks out of the way of a revival of His work.

5. If God sees in His people any disposition to withhold from Him the glory of the work He does. We see from this subject--

(1) Why so many prayers seem to be offered in vain.

(2) We see some of the causes of spiritual declension in the Church.

(3) The subject shows how we should set about raising the Church from her low estate.

(4) We see the duty of every Christian to search well his own heart. The hindrances to revivals are the sins of individuals. Each Christian, therefore, must search and purify himself.

(5) How fearful is the Church’s responsibility; and how great should be her watchfulness, lest by her apathy, her selfishness, or her unbelief, she hinder the work of the Lord. (National Preacher.)

The cry of a good man under the perplexing procedure of God

I. God’s apparent disregard to his earnest prayer. Under the pressure of that “burden” which was resting on his heart, namely, the moral corruption and the coming doom of his country; it would seem that he had often cried unto the Almighty and implored His interposition; but no answer had come. Why are not the prayers of good men immediately answered? In reply to this question three undoubted facts should be borne in mind.

1. That importunity of soul is necessary to qualify for the appreciation of the mercies sought. It is not until a man is made to feel the deep necessity of a thing that he values it when it comes. “How long shall I cry?” Until the sense of need is so intensified as to qualify for the reception and due appreciation of the blessing. Another fact that should be borne in mind is--

2. That the exercise of true prayer is in itself the best means of spiritual culture. Conscious contact with God is essential to moral excellence. You must bring the sunbeam to the seed you have sown, if you would have the seed quickened and developed; and you must bring God into conscious contact with your powers, if you would have them vivified and brought forth into strength and perfection. True prayer does this; it is the soul realising itself in the presence of Him “who quickeneth all things.”

3. That prayers are answered where there is no bestowment of the blessing invoked. “Not my will, but Thine be done.” This is all we want. Acquiescence in the Divine will is the moral perfection, dignity, and blessedness of all creatures in the universe. With these facts let us not be anxious about the apparent disregard of God to our prayers.

II. God’s apparent disregard to the moral condition of society. “Why dost Thou show me iniquity, and cause me to behold grievance? for spoiling and violence are before me: and there are that raise up strife and contention. Therefore the law is slacked, and judgment doth never go forth: for the wicked cloth compass about the righteous; therefore wrong judgment proceedeth.” The substance of this is the old complaint, “Wherefore doth the way of the wicked prosper?” Two facts should be set against this complaint.

1. The good have the best of it, even in this life.

2. The evil will have the worst of it in the next life. (Homilist.)

The expostulation of faith

The prophet is deeply afflicted, for there is little religion in the land, and as little of the true service of God. The one in reality is the measure of the other, although there may often seem more religion than righteousness. He does not, however, begin with attacking vice and irreligion and sin. He knows better than to do this. He carries his complaint to God, and in this way he would find some relief from his perplexity. The prophet expostulates with his God. His work seems almost hopeless, but he is a godly man, and he turns instinctively from man to God. Assuredly there is an expostulation of faith as well as of presumption. It may be good for the prophet, and for those in like circumstances, that at times God is silent. It is not that the prophet distrusts the justice or the mercy of God; it is rather, that in his impatience he would set times and seasons for His working. The times in which the prophet lived were times of ungodliness, of violence, and of misrule. Every one did that which was right in his own eyes. To correct this, the merely human sense of right is powerless. In such times, righteous men, such as wished to “lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and gravity,” must go to the wall. Even thus they cannot escape injustice and violence, scorn and oppression, from the many who have no belief in the Unseen, and who act accordingly. And so they are compassed about with wickedness. The mercy of God may be compassing them about, but for the time they can hardly see any evidences of it, and they are almost in despair. They are tempted to think that “all the foundations of the earth are moved,” and to say, “God hath forsaken the earth.” (P. Barclay, M. A.)

Freedom allowed in prayer

The prophet does not here teach the Jews, but prepares them for a coming judgment, as they could not but see that they were justly condemned, since they were proved guilty by the cry and complaints made by all the godly. Now this passage teaches us that all who really serve and love God, ought, according to the prophet s example, to burn with holy indignation whenever they see wickedness reigning without restraint among men, and especially in the Church of God. There is indeed nothing which ought to cause us more grief than to see men raging with profane contempt for God, and aa regard had for His law and for Divine truth, and all order trodden under foot. When therefore such a confusion appears to us, we must feel roused, if we have in us any spark of religion. If it be objected that the prophet exceeded moderation, the obvious answer is this,--that though he freely pours forth his feelings, there was nothing wrong in this before God, at least nothing wrong is imputed to him: for wherefore do we pray, but that each of us may unburden his cares, his griefs, and anxieties, by pouring them into me bosom of God? Since then God allows us to deal so familiarly with Him, nothing wrong ought to be ascribed to our prayers, when we thus freely pour forth our feelings, provided the bridle of obedience keeps us always within due limits, as was the case with the prophet; for it is certain that he was retained under the influence of real kindness. Our prophet here undertakes the defence of justice; for he could not endure the law of God to be made a sport, and men to allow themselves every liberty in sinning. He can be justly excused, though he expostulates here with God, for God does not condemn this freedom in our prayers. The end of praying is, that every one of us pour forth his heart before God. (John Calvin.)

The deeper plan in human events

In listening to a great organ, played by the hand of a master, there is often an undertone that controls the whole piece. Sometimes it is scarcely audible, and a careless listener would miss it altogether. The lighter play goes on, ebbing and flowing, rising and sinking, now softly gliding on the gentler stops, and now swelling out to the full power of the great organ. But amid all the changes and transpositions this undertone may be heard, steadily pursuing its own thought. The careless listener thinks the lighter play the main thing; but he that can appreciate musical ideas, as well as sounds, follows the quiet undertone of the piece, and finds in it the leading thought of the artist. So men see the outward events of life, the actions, the words, the wars, famines, sins; but underneath all God is carrying out His own plans, and compelling all outward things to aid the music He would make in this world. (Christian Age.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Habakkuk 1:2". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/habakkuk-1.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"O Jehovah, how long shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear? I cry unto thee of violence, and thou wilt not save."

What Christian has not experienced in his heart such questions as these? Rampant wickedness, blasphemy, atheism, rejection of sacred laws, and the arrogant confidence of evil men asserting themselves against truth and righteousness - one who is able to see such things in the light of the word of God may easily feel the frustration and latent doubt that nagged at the heart of Habakkuk. True followers of the Lord "are in danger of being unduly depressed and disheartened by the rising power of the mystery of iniquity."[4] Taylor expressed doubt that the extensive wickedness indicated in this verse could have been descriptive of wickedness in Judah prior to 600 B.C., alleging at the same time that it points to a period of 333-63 B.C.![5] One cannot possibly imagine what such a "doubt" could have been founded upon. Hosea, Micah, and Amos, and others of the very earliest prophets have written extensively, and even more fully than did Habakkuk, of that very thing. Such "doubts" are part and parcel of the campaign to destroy Habakkuk as a prophecy by the device of dating it centuries after the thing prophesied; and like the whole campaign, this tip of the iceberg which surfaces in such an argument is not founded upon any truth. Hosea wrote: "There is nothing but lying, and killing, and stealing, and committing adultery. They break out, and blood toucheth blood" (Hosea 4:2), and Micah declared of Israel that, "Their rich men are full of violence, and the inhabitants thereof have spoken lies ... therefore have I smitten thee with a grievous wound" (Micah 6:12,13). Those prophets described things in Israel at a time much earlier than that of Habakkuk.

Another device is that of applying Habakkuk 1:2-4 to the Chaldeans, or others, instead of to Judah, but, "The rearrangement of the text to support a particular theory is always questionable. It is safer to take the text (Habakkuk 1:2-4) as it stands and refer it to Judah."[6]

"I cry unto thee of violence..." "Violence, as used by the prophets refers to any kind of wrong done to one's neighbor."[7] In this passage Habakkuk places himself as a spokesman for the people, some of whom are righteous, crying unto God upon their behalf.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/habakkuk-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

O Lord, how long shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear!.... The prophet having long observed the sins and iniquities of the people among whom he lived, and being greatly distressed in his mind on account of them, had frequently and importunately cried unto the Lord to put a stop to the abounding of them, that the people might be brought to a sense of their sins, and reform from them; but nothing of this kind appearing, he concludes his prayers were not heard, and therefore expostulates with the Lord upon this head:

even cry unto thee of violence, and thou wilt not save! either of violence done to himself in the discharge of his office, or of one man to another, of the rich to the poor; and yet, though he cried again and again to the Lord, to check this growing evil, and deliver the oppressed out of the hands of their oppressors, it was not done; which was matter of grief and trouble to him.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/habakkuk-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

O LORD, how long shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear! [even] cry out to thee a [of] violence, and thou wilt not save!

(a) The Prophet complains to God, and bewails that among the Jews is left no fairness and brotherly love: but instead of these reigns cruelty, theft, contention, and strife.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/habakkuk-1.html. 1599-1645.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

As I have already reminded you, interpreters think that the Prophet speaks here of future things, as though he had in his view the calamity which he afterwards mentions; but this is too strained a meaning; I therefore doubt not but that the Prophet expostulates here with God for so patiently indulging a reprobate people. For though the Prophets felt a real concern for the safety of the people, there is yet no doubt but that they burned with zeal for the glory of God; and when they saw that they had to contend with refractory men, they were then inflamed with a holy displeasure, and undertook the cause of God; and they implored His aid to bring a remedy when the state of things had become desperate. I therefore consider that the Prophet here solicits God to visit these many sins in which the people had hardened themselves. And hence we conclude that he had previously exercised his office of a teacher; for it would have been otherwise improper for him to begin his work with such a complaint and expostulation. He had then by experience found that the people were extremely perverse. When he saw that there was no hope of amendment, and that the state of things was becoming daily worse, burning with zeal for God, he gave full vent to his feelings. Before, then, he threatens the people with the future vengeance of God, he withdraws himself, as it were, from intercourse with men, and in private addresses God himself.

We must bear this first in mind, that the Prophet relates here the secret colloquy he had with God: but it ought not to be ascribed to an unfeeling disposition, that in these words he wished to hasten God’s vengeance against his own kindred; for it behaved the Prophet not only to be solicitous for the salvation of the people, but also to feel a concern for the glory of God, yea, to burn with a holy zeal. As, then, he had in vain labored for a length of time, I doubt not but that, being as it were far removed from the presence of all witnesses, he here asks God, how long he purposed thus to bear with the wickedness of the people. We now apprehend the design of the Prophet and the import of his words.

But he says first, How long, Jehovah, shall I cry, and thou hearest not? How long shall I cry to thee for violence, that is, on account of violence, and thou savest not? We hence learn, that the Prophet had often prayed God to correct the people for their wickedness, or to contrive some means to prevent so much licentiousness in sinning. It is indeed probable that the Prophet had prayed as long as there was any hope; but when he saw that things were past recovery, he then prayed more earnestly that God would undertake the office of a judge, and chastise the people. For though the Prophet really condoled with those who perished, and was touched, as I have said, with a serious concern for their public safety, he yet preferred the glory of God: when, therefore, he saw that boldness in sin increased through impunity, and that the Jews in a manlier mocked God when they found that they could sin without being punished, he could not endure such unbridled wantonness. Besides, the Prophet may have spoken thus, not only as expressing his own feeling, but what he felt in common with all the godly; as though he had undertaken here a public duty, and utters a complaint common to all the faithful: for it is probable that all the godly, in so disordered a state of things, mourned alike. How long, then, shall I cry? How long, he says, shall I cry on account of violence? that is, When all things are in disorder, when there is now no regard for equity and justice, but men abandon themselves, as it were with loose reins, unto all kinds of wickedness, how long, Lord, wilt thou take no notice? But in these words the Prophet not only egresses his own feelings, but makes this kind of preface, that the Jews might better understand that the time of vengeance was come; for they were become not only altogether intolerable to God, but also to his servants. God indeed had suspended his judgement, though he had been often solicited to execute it by his Prophet. It hence appears, that their wickedness had made such advances that it would be no wonder if they were now severely chastised by the Lord; for they had by their sins not only provoked him against them, but also all the godly and the faithful.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/habakkuk-1.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

BOLDNESS WITH GOD

‘O Lord, how long shall I cry, and Thou wilt not hear?’

Habakkuk 1:2

These are strong words to be spoken by saint to God. They are part of a whole context of similar strong words.

I. So strange a phenomenon has presented to many pious readers a distressing problem.—Hooker has elaborately vindicated Habakkuk from the charge of having committed the great sin of despair. But Habakkuk is not alone in the Bible with this startling appeal and protest. See Asaph’s similar problem in Psalms 73

II. What shall we say? That the God of the saints and prophets is a patient and generous God.—How notable is His long-suffering sympathy?

He respects man’s inability to see the whole meaning of a complex case, and to forecast its end.

III. So it is an encouragement to speak out to Him all that is in our burthened souls.—We are to come to the throne of grace with parrhesia, ‘boldness,’ telling out the very thought, unrelieved, exactly as it is. Habakkuk showed this parrhesia, and told out all his feelings. In our revealed nearness to God in Christ we can do the same. Feeling the bewilderment, yet ‘knowing Whom we have trusted.’

—Bishop H. C. G. Moule.


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/habakkuk-1.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Habakkuk 1:2 O LORD, how long shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear! [even] cry out unto thee [of] violence, and thou wilt not save!

Ver. 2. O Lord, how long shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear?] Lo, this is the confidence of a good conscience towards God, 1 Peter 3:21, when it is parleying with him by prayers and bold intercessions ( εντευξεις), 1 Timothy 2:1, it dare plead, as Jeremiah 12:1, and interrogate, as Romans 8:33-35, Isaiah 63:15, and expostulate, as David often: when God seems to be asleep, he wakes him; when to delay, he quickens him; when to have lost his wonted kindness, he finds it for him; so doth Habakkuk here; for he knew he might do it. See his holy boldness beneath, Habakkuk 1:12, and learn to continue instant in prayer, Romans 12:12, crying, Quousque Domine? How long, Lord? This was Mr Calvin’s motto, ever in his mouth, as Deo gratias grace to God, was in Austin’s.

Even cry out unto thee of violence] i.e. Of all sorts of heinous sins, which I have long cried out upon, and sought by preaching and prayer to redress, but cannot; so incorrigibly flagitious are they grown, that I have now no other way left, but to turn them over to thee, with a Non convertentur, They will not be converted. Shall they still "escape by iniquity? in thine anger cast down the people, O God," Psalms 56:7, and let them feel the power of thy wrath that will not submit to the sceptre of thy kingdom. Thus the holy prophet {Elijah-like, Romans 11:2} maketh intercession to God against Israel (when once incorrigible, uncurable), for whose souls’ health he would have spent and been spent, Impendam et expendar.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/habakkuk-1.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

O Lord: unto God alone he makes his application, as only able to redress all grievances.

How long! it may be some years he had preached, and in preaching had complained and cried out against wickedness.

Shall I cry, unto men in thy name, and unto thee in prayer and supplication.

And thou wilt not hear; give answer by correcting or punishing the bad, and by rescuing and delivering the good; by appearing a just Arbitrator and Judge of both.

Cry out, with submission, not murmuring, not impatient, not distrusting the justice or mercy of God. Unto thee, who art more displeased than I or any one else can be disquieted with that I complain of, who art by office and word bound to restrain violence, &c.

Of violence; the unjust and wicked oppressions which I see, others feel, and all good people are endangered by.

And thou wilt not save; by changing the bad, or restraining them, or by overthrowing them, and setting up just and upright men in their room, both in Jerusalem and in Judea, and every where else.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/habakkuk-1.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

In prayer the prophet asked Yahweh "how long" would he have to call for help before the Lord responded (cf. Habakkuk 2:6; Exodus 16:28; Numbers 14:11). God hears all prayers because He is omniscient, but Habakkuk meant that God had not given evidence of hearing by responding to his prayer. He had cried out to the Lord reminding Him of the violence that he observed in Judah, but the Lord had not provided deliverance (cf. Genesis 6:11; Genesis 6:13; Job 19:7). Normally where "justice" (Heb. mishpat) and "violence" (hamas) are in opposition in the Old Testament, as here, the wicked are Israelites unless they are clearly identified as being others (e.g, Exodus 23:1-9; Isaiah 5:7-15). God had apparently not heard, and He certainly had not helped the prophet.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/habakkuk-1.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Save. Some think that he expresses the sentiments of the weak, like David, (Psalms lxxii. 2.) or what he had formerly entertained. The language of the prophets is very bold, Exodus xxxii. 32., Job iii. 3., Jeremias xx. 14., and Jonas iv. 8. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/habakkuk-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.

cry = cry for help in distress; as in Psalms 18:6, Psalms 18:41; Psalms 22:24. Compare Job 19:7. Jeremiah 20:8. Showing that the cry is not personal, but made in the name of all who suffered from the evil times.

cry out = cry with a loud voice, implying the complaint.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/habakkuk-1.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) Even cry out.—The latter half of the verse is best rendered “Even cry unto thee ‘Violence!’ and thou wilt not save.” The single word “violence!” (châmâs) occurs elsewhere, as an appeal for assistance, used as we use the cry “murder!” “fire!” &c., among ourselves. (See Jeremiah 20:8, Job 19:7.)


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/habakkuk-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

O LORD, how long shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear! even cry out unto thee of violence, and thou wilt not save!
how
Psalms 13:1,2; 74:9,10; 94:3; Revelation 6:10
and thou wilt not save
Psalms 22:1,2; Jeremiah 14:9; Lamentations 3:8

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Habakkuk 1:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/habakkuk-1.html.

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