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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 15:5

 

 

My heart cries out for Moab; His fugitives are as far as Zoar and Eglath-shelishiyah, For they go up the ascent of Luhith weeping; Surely on the road to Horonaim they raise a cry of distress over their ruin.

Adam Clarke Commentary

My heart shall cry out for Moab "The heart of Moab crieth within her" - For לבי libbi, my heart, the Septuagint reads לבו libbo, his heart, or לב leb ; the Chaldee, לבו libbo . For בריחיה bericheyha, the Syriac reads ברוחה berocheh ; and so likewise the Septuagint, rendering it εν αυτῃ, Edit. Vat: or εν ἑαυτῃ, Edit. Alex. and MSS. I., D. II.

A heifer of three years old "A young heifer" - Hebrew, a heifer three years old, in full strength; as Horace uses equa trima, for a young mare just coming to her prime. Bochart observes, from Aristotle, Hist. Animal. lib. 4 that in this kind of animals alone the voice of the female is deeper than that of the male; therefore the lowing of the heifer, rather than of the bullock, is chosen by the prophet, as the more proper image to express the mourning of Moab. But I must add that the expression here is very short and obscure; and the opinions of interpreters are various in regard to the meaning. Compare Jeremiah 48:34.

Shall they go it up "They shall ascend" - For יעלה yaaleh, the Septuagint and a MS. read in the plural, יעלו yaalu . And from this passage the parallel place in Jeremiah 48:5; must be corrected; where, for בכי יעלה yaaleh bechi, which gives no good sense, read בו יעלה yaaleh bo .


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

My heart shall cry out for Moab - This is expressive of deep compassion; and is proof that, in the view of the prophet, the calamities which were coming upon it were exceedingly heavy. The same sentiment is expressed more fully in Isaiah 16:11; see also Jeremiah 48:36: ‹My heart shall sound for Moab like pipes.‘ The phrase denotes great inward pain and anguish in view of the calamities of others; and is an expression of the fact that we feel ourselves oppressed and borne down by sympathy on account of their sufferings (see the note at Isaiah 21:3). It is worthy of remark, that the Septuagint reads this as if it were ‹“his” heart‘ - referring to the Moabites, ‹the heart of Moab shall cry out.‘ So the Chaldee; and so Lowth, Michaelis, and others read it. But there is no authority for this change in the Hebrew text; nor is it needful. In the parallel place in Jeremiah 48:36, there is no doubt that the heart of the prophet is intended; and here, the phrase is designed to denote the deep compassion which a holy man of God would have, even when predicting the ills that should come upon others. How much compassion, how much deep and tender feeling should ministers of the gospel have when they are describing the final ruin - the unutterable woes of impenitent sinners under the awful wrath of God in the world of woe!

His fugitives - Margin, ‹Or to the borders thereof, even as an heifer‘ (בריחיה berı̂ychehā ). Jerome and the Vulgate render this ‹her “bars,”‘ and it has been explained as meaning that the voice of the prophet, lamenting the calamity of Moab, could be heard as far as the “bars,” or gates, of Zoar; or that the word “bars” means “princes, that is,” protectors, a figure similar to “shields of the land” Hosea 4:18. The Septuagint renders it, Ἐν αὐτὴ en autē - ‹The voice of Moab in her is heard to Zoar.‘ But the more correct rendering is, undoubtedly, that of our translation, referring to the fugitives who should attempt to make their escape from Moab when the calamities should come upon her.

Unto Zoar - Zoar was a small town in the southern extremity of the Dead Sea, to which Lot fled when Sodom was overthrown Genesis 19:23. Abulfeda writes the name Zoghar, and speaks of it as existing in his day. The city of Zoar was near to Sodom, so as to be exposed to the danger of being overthrown in the same manner that Sodom was, Zoar being exempted from destruction by the angel at the solicitation of Lot Genesis 19:21. That the town lay on the east side of the Dead Sea, is apparent from several considerations. Lot ascended from it to the mountain where his daughters bore each of them a son, who became the ancestors of the Moabites and the Ammonites. But these nations both dwelt on the east side of the Dead Sea. Further, Josephus, speaking of this place, calls it Ζοάρων τῆς Ἀραβίας Zoarōn tēs Arabias - ‹Zoar of Arabia‘ (Bell. Jud. iv. 8,4). But the Arabia of Josephus was on the east of the Dead Sea. So the crusaders, in the expedition of King Baldwin, 1100 a.d., after marching from Hebron, proceeded around the lake, and came, at length, to a place called “Segor,” doubtless the Zoghar of Abulfeda. The probability, therefore, is, that it was near the southern end of the sea, but on the eastern side. The exact place is now unknown. In the time of Eusebius and Jerome, it is described as having many inhabitants, and a Roman garrison. In the time of the crusaders, it is mentioned as a place pleasantly situated, with many palm trees. But the palm trees have disappeared, and the site of the city can be only a matter of conjecture (see Robinson‘s “Bib. Researches,” vol. ii. pp. 648-651).

An heifer of three years old - That is, their fugitives flying unto Zoar shall lift up the voice like an heifer, for so Jeremiah in the parallel place explains it Jeremiah 48:34. Many interpreters have referred this, however, to Zoar as an appellation of that city, denoting its flourishing condition. Bochart refers it to Isaiah, and supposes that he designed to say that “he” lifted his voice as an heifer. But the more obvious interpretation is that given above, and is that which occurs in Jeremiah. The expression, however, is a very obscure one. See the various senses which it may bear, examined in Rosenmuller and Gesenius in loc. Gesenius renders it, ‹To Eglath the third;‘ and supposes, in accordance with many interpreters, that it denotes a place called “Eglath,” called the third in distinction from two other places of the same name; though he suggests that the common explanation, that it refers to a heifer of the age of three years, may be defended. In the third year, says he, the heifer was most vigorous, and hence, was used for an offering Genesis 15:9. Until that age she was accustomed to go unbroken, and bore no yoke (Pliny, 8,4,5). If this refers to Moab, therefore, it may mean that hitherto it was vigorous, unsubdued, and active; but that now, like the heifer, it was to be broken and brought under the yoke by chastisement. The expression is a very difficult one, and it is impossible, perhaps, to determine what is the true sense.

By the mounting up of Luhith - The “ascent” of Luhith. It is evident, from Jeremiah 48:5, that it was a mountain, but where, is not clearly ascertained. Eusebius supposes it was a place between Areopolis and Zoar (see Reland‘s “Palestine,” pp. 577-579). The whole region there is mountainous.

In the way of Horonaim - This was, doubtless, a town of Moab, but where it was situated is uncertain. The word means “two holes.” The region abounds to this day with caves, which are used for dwellings (Seetzen). The place lay, probably, on a declivity from which one descended from Luhith.

A cry of destruction - Hebrew, ‹Breaking.‘ A cry “appropriate” to the great calamity that should come upon Moab.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-15.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Isaiah 15:5

My heart shall cry out for Moab

The burden of souls

Too often have God’s servants spoken with dry eyes and hard voices of the doom of the ungodly; and have only made them more obdurate and determined.
We never need so much brokenness of spirit as when we utter God’s judgments against sin. In his autobiography, Finney says, “Here I must introduce the name of a man whom I shall have occasion to mention frequently, Mr. Abel Clary, He was the son of a very excellent man, and an elder of the Church where I was converted. He had been licensed to preach; but his spirit of prayer was such, he was so burdened with the souls of men, that he was not able to preach much, his whole time and strength being given to prayer. The burden of his soul would frequently be so great that he was unable to stand, and he would writhe and groan in agony. I was well acquainted with him, and knew something of the wonderful spirit of prayer that was upon him The pastor told me afterwards that he found that in the six weeks I was in that church five hundred souls had been converted.” (
F. B. Meyer, B. A.)

The prophet’s distress concerning Moab

(see also Isaiah 16:9):--These are the men who prevail with men. In the early part of the sixteenth century there was a great religious awakening in Ulster, which began under a minister named Glendinning. He was of very meagre natural gifts, but would spend many days and nights alone with God, and seems to have been greatly burdened with the souls of men and their state before God. It is not to be wondered at, therefore, that, under his pleading, multitudes of hearers were brought into great anxiety and terror of conscience. They looked on themselves as altogether lost. They were stricken into a swoon by the vower of God’s Word. A dozen in one day were carried out of doors as dead. These were not women, but some of the boldest spirits of the neighbourhood “some who had formerly not feared with their swords to put the whole market town into a fray.” This revival changed the whole character of northern Ireland. Would that God might lay on our hearts a similar burden for our Churches and our land! (F. B. Meyer, B. A.)
.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Isaiah 15:5". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/isaiah-15.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

My heart shall cry out for Moab,.... These seem to be the words of the prophet, pitying them as they were fellow creatures, though enemies; which shows humanity in him, and signifies that their calamities were very great, that a stranger should be concerned for them, and such to whom they had been troublesome; so Jarchi understands it, who observes the difference between the true and false prophet, particularly between Isaiah and Balaam; but others, as Kimchi, interpret it of the Moabites themselves, everyone expressing their concern for the desolation of their country; and so the Targum,

"the Moabites shall say in their hearts:'

his fugitives shall flee unto Zoar; a city where Lot fled to, when he came out of Sodom, to which it is thought the allusion is, see Genesis 19:20 the meaning seems to be, that those that escaped out of the above cities, when taken and destroyed, should flee hither for safety: the words may be supplied thus, "his fugitives" shall cry out "unto Zoar"; that is, those that flee from other places shall cry so loud as they go along, that their cry shall be heard unto Zoar, Jeremiah 48:34,

an heifer of three years old; which is not to be understood of Zoar in particular, or of the country of Moab in general, comparable to such an heifer for fatness, strength, beauty, and lasciviousness; but of the cry of the fugitives, that should be very loud and clamorous, like the lowing of an ox, or an heifer in its full strength, which is heard a great way; see 1 Samuel 6:9. Dr. LightfootF3See his Works, vol. 2. p. 502. conjectures that "Eglath Shelishiah", translated an heifer of three years old, is the proper name of a place; and observes, that there was another place in this country called Eneglaim, Ezekiel 47:10 which being of the dual number, shows that there were two Egels, in reference to which this may be called the "third" Eglath; and so the words may be rendered, "his fugitives shall flee unto Zoar, unto the third Eglath"; and he further conjectures, that this may be the Necla of PtolemyF4Geograph. l. 5. c. 17. , mentioned by him in Arabia Petraea, along with Zoara; and also to be the Agella of JosephusF5Antiqu. l. 1. c. 1. sect. 4. , reckoned with Zoara and Oronai, and other cities of Moab:

for by the mounting up of Luhith with weeping shall they go it up; which seems to have been a very high place, and the ascent to it very great; and as the Moabites went up it, whither they might go for safety, they should weep greatly, thinking of their houses and riches they had left to the plunder of the enemy, and the danger of their lives they were still in. This place is thought by some to be the same with the Lysa of PtolemyF6Geograph. l. 5. c. 17. p. 137. ; JosephusF7Antiqu. l. 14. c. 1. sect. 4. calls it Lyssa; JeromF8De locis Hebraicis, fol. 93. A. says in his time it was a village between Areopolis and Zoara, and went by the name of Luitha; it is mentioned in Jeremiah 48:5,

for in the way of Horonaim they shall raise up a cry of destruction; of Moab, and the several cities of it; or "of breaking", of breaking down of walls and of houses. The Targum is,

"the cry of the broken (or conquered) in battle;'

whose bones are broken, or however their strength, so that they are obliged to surrender; or a "broken cry", such as is made when there is a multitude of people together, and in great distress. The word Horonaim is of the dual number, and signifies two Horons, the upper and the lower, as say Kimchi and Ben Melech; which is true of Bethhoron, if that was the same place with this, Joshua 16:3. By JosephusF9Antiqu. l. 13. c. 15. sect. 4. & l. 14. c. 1. sect. 4. it is called Oronas and Oronae; it is taken by some to be the Avara of PtolemyF11Geograph. l. 5. c. 17. p. 137. ; it seems, by the Targum, that as Luhith was a very high place, this lay low, since it renders it,

"in the descent of Horonaim;'

to which its name agrees, which signifies caverns; and mention is made of Bethhoron in the valley, along with BethnimrahF12T. Hieros. Sheviith, fol. 38. 4. .


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

My f heart shall cry out for Moab; his fugitives [shall flee] to Zoar, g an heifer of three years old: for they shall go up the ascent of Luhith with weeping for in the way of Horonaim they h shall raise a cry of destruction.

(f) The prophet speaks this in the person of the Moabites: or as one who felt the great judgment of God that God would come on them.

(g) Meaning that it was a city that always lived in pleasure and never felt sorrow.

(h) He describes the miserable dissipation and flight of the Moabites.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

My — The prophet himself is moved with pity for Moab. Ministers, in denouncing the wrath of God against sinners, should do it with tender sorrow, not with exultation.

fugitives — fleeing from Moab, wander as far as to Zoar, on the extreme boundary south of the Dead Sea. Horsley translates, “her nobility,” or “rulers” (Hosea 4:18).

heifer, etc. — that is, raising their voices “like a heifer” (compare Jeremiah 48:34, Jeremiah 48:36). The expression “three years old,” implies one at its full vigor (Genesis 15:9), as yet not brought under the yoke; as Moab heretofore unsubdued, but now about to be broken. So Jeremiah 31:18; Hosea 4:13. Maurer translates, “Eglath” (in English Version, “a heifer”) {Shelishijah} (that is, the third, to distinguish it from two others of the same name).

by the mounting up — up the ascent.

Luhith — a mountain in Moab.

Horonaim — a town of Moab not far from Zoar (Jeremiah 48:5). It means “the two poles,” being near caves.

cry of destruction — a cry appropriate to the destruction which visits their country.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-15.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

My heart shall cry out for Moab; his fugitives shall flee unto Zoar, an heifer of three years old: for by the mounting up of Luhith with weeping shall they go it up; for in the way of Horonaim they shall raise up a cry of destruction.

Moab — Tho' they are a most vile nation.

Zoar — Zoar was a town bordering upon Moab.

Of destruction — Such a cry as men send forth when they are just falling into the pit of destruction.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-15.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

5.My heart shall cry out for Moab. At length he assumes the character of a mourner. But it may be thought to be strange and inconsistent in him to bewail the calamity of the Moabites; for he ought rather to have lamented the destruction of the Church, and to have rejoiced at the ruin of her enemies. It is customary with the prophets, however, to assume in this manner the character of those whose calamities they foretell, and thus to exhibit their condition, as it were, on a stage; by which means they produce a stronger impression than if they delivered their instruction in a direct form. Yet there can be no doubt that the prophets shuddered at the judgments of God, even against the wicked; though the meaning which I have stated is simpler and more appropriate, and may easily be inferred from frequent usage.

His fugitives to Zoar, (242) a heifer of three years old. He calls them fugitives who shall escape from it; for he means that those who shall escape from Moab will come even to Zoar (243) Now, he compares Zoar to a heifer of three years old, which is in full vigor, and has not felt the pangs of birth, or toil, or the yoke, but revels in the buoyancy of mirth and wantonness. When men are hard pressed by an invading army, they flee to cities which have not been attacked, and which appear to be the farthest removed from danger. Such was Zoar, for it had never been attacked by enemies. Yet, if it be thought better to view it as applying to the whole country, I have no objection; for Jeremiah appears to speak in general terms, though he borrows many statements from Isaiah. (Jeremiah 48:34.) But perhaps in that passage also he names both Zoar and Horonaim, or rather the whole of the country between them.

If you extend it to the whole nation, the meaning will be, “The Moabites have enjoyed the highest luxury, and every kind of abundance, and hitherto have suffered no distress. Hence has arisen their stubbornness, and, in order to subdue them, they must be banished and driven even to Zoar. ” Now Zoar was a town very far removed from the Moabites; and, therefore, he means that they cannot provide for their safety but by fleeing to a distance. Here all with whom the Lord deals tenderly are taught not to exalt themselves, or to provoke God by their wantonness, but to be modest even amidst the highest prosperity, and likewise to be prepared for every change, when the Lord shall be pleased to throw them down from their prosperity.

By the going up of Luhith. He describes other parts of the country of Moab, and delineates the flight and mourning of that nature which should spread throughout the whole land.

By the way of Horonaim they shall raise the cry of sorrow. The words which we have translated, they shall raise up a cry, some render, they shall bruise or break themselves by crying, and think there is a transposition of the letters, and that ע (ain) is doubled; and thus the root of the verb would be רעה, (ragnah.) But as it made little difference in the meaning of the passage, I have adhered to the commonly received opinion, that יעערו (yegnogneru) is derived from the verb עור, (gnur.) If it be thought better to make the verb signify break, the meaning will be, “There shall be a shaking, and, as it were, a breaking of the members of the body, when arm is dashed against arm.”


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-15.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 15:5 My heart shall cry out for Moab; his fugitives [shall flee] unto Zoar, an heifer of three years old: for by the mounting up of Luhith with weeping shall they go it up; for in the way of Horonaim they shall raise up a cry of destruction.

Ver. 5. My heart shall cry out for Moab.] Let others do as they will, saith the prophet here, I can do no less than bewail the woeful condition of Moab, bad though they be. (a)

Tu quibus ista legis incertum est, Lector, ocellls:

Ipse quidem siccis scribere non potui ”

His fugitives shall flee unto Zoar.] Whither once their father Lot fled for refuge; but it was too hot to hold him. Or, His fugitives shall cry to Zoar.

An heifer of three years old.] Which, being in her prime, loweth aloud, coelum mugitibus implens; so shall these fugitives set up their note, clamore fragoso boantes; as they pass through the countries they shall even break or rend themselves with crying.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-15.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

I pause over this verse to remark, and admire, the tender mercies of the Prophet. Though an enemy, yet the Prophet weeps over Moab. Alas! who that is born of a woman, but must feel for the miseries induced by sin in our common nature? Methinks here is a loud appeal to the ministers of Jesus, to have very feeling hearts over the miseries coming upon sinners: How did the bowels of Jesus yearn over the approaching desolations of Jerusalem? Luke 13:34-35.


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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/isaiah-15.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

My heart shall cry out for Moab; their destruction approaching is so dreadful, that although they are a most vile nation, and by their implacable enmity against God and his people do abundantly deserve it, yet the respect which I have to human nature fills me with horror at the very thoughts of it. Compare Isaiah 16:11.

His fugitives; or, his bars, as others render it, and as this word is frequently taken, as Exodus 26:26,27 Psa 107:16, &c.; whereby we may understand their valiant men, or their princes and rulers, who as they are called the shields of the earth, Psalms 47:9, because, like shields, they do or should defend their people; so for the same reason they may be called bars, because bars are the strength of the gates of cities or castles, and therefore are mentioned as such, Psalms 147:13 Proverbs 18:19 Jeremiah 51:30.

Shall flee unto Zoar; or, shall cry unto Zoar; either shall cry as they go along the way, even till they come to Zoar; or shall cry so as they may be heard to Zoar; which may easily be understood out of the foregoing verse. Zoar was a town bordering upon Moab; of which see Genesis 19:20-22 Deuteronomy 34:3.

An heifer of three years old; which some understand of the city of Zoar, so called for her strength and wantonness. But such a description of Zoar seems very improper and impertinent in this place. The words therefore are to be translated here, as they are by our translators, Jeremiah 48:34 as

an heifer of three years old; and so they belong to their cry, and signify that it is strong and loud, like that of such an heifer.

In the way of Horonaim they shall raise up a cry; he signifies that the cry should be universal, in all places where they come, and reaching from one side of the country to another. Of Luhith, see Jeremiah 48:4,5.

Of destruction; such a cry as men send forth when they are just falling into the pit of destruction.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-15.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘My heart cries out for Moab, her nobles flee to Zoar,

To Eglath-Shelishiyah,

For by the ascent of Luhith they go up with weeping,

For in the way of Horonaim they raise up a cry of destruction.’

Panic has seized the whole of Moab. The nobles flee to the Dead Sea area, to Zoar, and to Eglath-Shelishiyah. The people stream to the ascent of Luhith, weeping as they climb. They take the highway of Horonaim in their desperation to get away, crying out concerning the destruction of Moab. The whole of Moab are refugees.

‘My heart cries out for Moab.’ This may be Isaiah, or it may be God speaking (compare Isaiah 15:9). He does not find judgment easy to bear.

Some read ‘Eglath Shelishiyah’ as referring to ‘a heifer of the third year’, and see it as indicating that Moab is like an untamed heifer now being subjected to the yoke.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/isaiah-15.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5. My heart shall cry out — The prophet himself enters into sympathy with the affrighted people, whose stampede is even to Zoar, with a terror like that of the bellowing heifer. Zoar was for long held to be at the south of Moab, or at the foot of the Dead Sea. So Josephus, Jerome, and Dr. Robinson. But more recently its location is thought to be identical with Zi’ara, near Mt. Nebo. But see TRISTRAM, Land of Moab; also, SMITH’S Bible Dictionary, pro and con.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/isaiah-15.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Isaiah 15:5. My heart shall cry out for Moab — “Hitherto the prophet had set forth the lamentations of the Moabites, but, seeing these future evils, as it were, present to his own mind, he compassionates their griefs, and declares his own participation of their sorrows.” His fugitives shall flee unto Zoar, &c. — The meaning of this clause is thought to be, His fugitives shall cry, so as they may be heard unto Zoar; or, shall wander and cry as they go along the way, even till they come to Zoar. A heifer — Or, as a heifer; as the words are translated Jeremiah 48:34; that is, they shall send forth their cries, by weeping and lamenting, like a heifer. “Three years old, is mentioned only to denote a full-grown heifer, the lowing of which, naturalists have remarked, is deeper and more affecting than that of the male.” Zoar was a town bordering upon Moab. By the mounting up of Luhith — It is not certain what place this was, but it is evident enough that it was some elevated tract, or ascent, in the extremity of Moab. Horonaim was also a city of Moab, situated probably in the descent from Luhith. They shall raise up a cry of destruction — Such a cry as men send forth when they are just falling into the pit of destruction. He signifies that the cry should be universal in all places where they should come, and reaching from one side of the country to the other.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/isaiah-15.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

My. A charitable heart will grieve for the misfortune of an enemy. (Worthington) --- I shall join in the general lamentations, though Moab has always been so great an enemy of Israel. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "the heart of Moab cries in itself to Segor." (Haydock) --- We will retire thither. (Chaldean) --- Bars. Princes. Protestants, "his fugitives shall," &c. --- Heifer. Strong and ungovernable. Hebrew, "to Heglath and to Shelishia for," &c., though we may as well adhere to the Vulgate, Septuagint, &c.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-15.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Zoar. Now (probably) Tell esh Shaghur. not him that wandereth. Deuteronomy 34:3. Jeremiah 48:34.

an heifer = [flee] like an heifer, &c. Compare Jeremiah 48:34.

mounting up = ascent.

Luhith. Now Tel"at el Heith; one mile west of Mount Nebo. Compare Jeremiah 48:5

Horonaim. Not identified; probably Wady Ghueir.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

My heart shall cry out for Moab; his fugitives shall flee unto Zoar, an heifer of three years old: for by the mounting up of Luhith with weeping shall they go it up; for in the way of Horonaim they shall raise up a cry of destruction.

My heart shall cry out for Moab. The prophet himself is moved with pity for Moab. Ministers, in denouncing the wrath of God against sinners, should do it with tender sorrow, not with exultation.

His fugitives (shall flee) unto Zoar - fleeing from Moab, wander as far as to Zoar, on the extreme boundary south of the Dead Sea. Horsley translates, her nobility, or "rulers" (Hosea 4:18).

An heifer of three years old - i:e., raising their voices, 'like a heifer' (cf. Jeremiah 48:34; Jeremiah 48:36). The expression, "three years old," implies one at its full vigour (Genesis 15:9), as yet not bright under the yoke: as Moab, heretofore unsubdued, but now about to be broken. So Jeremiah 31:18; Hosea 4:16. Maurer translates, 'Eglath (in the English version "a heifer" ) Shelishijah' (i:e., the third, to distinguish it from two others of the same name). I prefer the English version.

By the mounting up - up the ascent. Of Luhith - a mountain in Moab.

For in the way of Horonaim - a town of Moab not far from Zoar (Jeremiah 48:5). It means the two holes, being near caves.

They shall raise up a cry of destruction - a cry appropriate to the destruction which visits their country.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) My heart shall cry out for Moab . . .—The prophet, though a stranger to Moab, and belonging to a hostile people, is touched with pity at the sight—the fugitives fleeing before the army coming from the north to Zoar, at the extreme south of the Dead Sea (see Note on Genesis 19:22), in the wild scare as of a frightened heifer as yet untamed by the yoke (Jeremiah 31:18; Jeremiah 48:34; Jeremiah 1:11). The English “fugitives” answers to the marginal reading of the Hebrew, the text of which (followed by the Vulg.) gives, “his bars reach unto Zoar;” but it is not easy to connect this with the context.

By the mounting up of Luhith . . .—No city has been identified as bearing this name. Probably “the ascent of Luhith” (the name may indicate a staircase of boards) was the well-known approach (Jeremiah 48:5) to a Moabite sanctuary. Eusebius (Onomast.) speaks of it as between Zoar and Areopolis (Rabbath Moab). Horonaim (here and in Jeremiah 48:3; Jeremiah 48:5; Jeremiah 48:34) is as little known as its companion. The name, which in Hebrew means “two caverns,” is, perhaps, descriptive of the nature of the sanctuary. The point of the description is that the fugitives when they reach Horonaim, are met with the cry of destruction, “All is over.”


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

My heart shall cry out for Moab; his fugitives shall flee unto Zoar, an heifer of three years old: for by the mounting up of Luhith with weeping shall they go it up; for in the way of Horonaim they shall raise up a cry of destruction.
My heart
16:9-11; Jeremiah 8:18,19; 9:10,18,19; 13:17; 17:16; 48:31-36; Luke 19:41-44; Romans 9:1-3
his fugitives, etc
or, to the borders thereof, even as an heifer. Zoar.
Genesis 13:10; 14:2; 19:22
three
16:14; Jeremiah 48:34
the mounting
Jeremiah 48:5,34
with
2 Samuel 15:23,30
destruction
Heb. breaking.
22:5; Jeremiah 4:20

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-15.html.

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