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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 15:7

 

 

Therefore the abundance which they have acquired and stored up They carry off over the brook of Arabim.

Adam Clarke Commentary

"Shall perish" - אבדו abadu or אבדה abadeh . This word seems to have been lost out of the text: it is supplied by the parallel place, Jeremiah 48:36. The Syriac expresses it by עבר aber, praeteriit, "he hath passed;" and the Chaldee by יתבזזון yithbazezun, diripientur.

To the brook of the willows "To the valley of willows" - That is, to Babylon. Hieron. and Jarchi in loc., both referring to Psalm 137:2. So likewise Prideaux, Le Clerc, etc.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Therefore, the abundance they have gotten - Their wealth they shall remove from a place that is utterly burned up with drought, where the waters and the grass fail, to another place where they may find water.

To the brook of willows - Margin, ‹The valley of the Arabians.‘ The Septuagint renders it, ‹I will lead them to the valley of the Arabians, and they shall take it.‘ So Saadias. It might, perhaps, be called the valley of the Arabians, because it was the boundary line between them and Arabia on the south. Lowth renders it, ‹To Babylon.‘ The probability is, that the prophet refers to some valley or brook that was called the brook of the willows, from the fact that many willows grew upon its bank. Perhaps it was the small stream which flows into the southern extremity of the Dead Sea, and which forms the boundary of Arabia Petrea of the province of Jebal. They withdrew toward the south, where toward Petra or Sela they had their property in herds Isaiah 16:1, for probably the invader came from the north, and drove them in this direction. Lowth, and most commentators, suppose that ‹they‘ in this verse refers to the enemies of Moab, and that it means that they would carry away the property of Moab to some distant place. But the more probable meaning is, that when the waters of the Nimrim should fail, they would remove to a place better watered; that is, they would leave their former abode, and wander away. It is an image of the desolation that was coming upon the land.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-15.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Therefore the abundance they have gotten, and that which they have laid up,.... The great substance which the Moabites had got, and hoarded up:

shall they carry away to the brook of the willows; either the Moabites should carry their substance to some brook, it may be near Nimrim, where many willows grew, and cast it into the brook, or lay it by the brook side, in some private place, or under and among the willows, to preserve it from the enemy; or else the meaning is, that their enemies should take what they had with a great deal of labour got, and with a great deal of care had laid up, and carry it to the brook of the willows, some place without the city, and there divide it; or to the valley of the ArabiansF17על נחל הערבים "in vallem Arabum", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, Cocceius. , as some render it, some part of Arabia lying between Moab and Babylon, whither they might carry it, in order to the conveyance of it into their own country at a proper time: it may be observed, that the country of Moab came after this into the hands of the Arabians; and, according to Jerom, the valley of Arabia lay in the way from Moab to Assyria; but it may be rendered "the valley of the willows", and design the land of Babylon, or Babylon itself, which was built in a plain, or on a flat by the river Euphrates, out of which many canals and rivulets were cut and derived, near to which willows in great abundance grew; as they usually do in marshy and watery places; hence the Jews in Babylon are said to hang their harps upon the willows which were by its rivers; so Jarchi thinks the land of Babylon is meant, and compares it with Psalm 137:1 which sense is approved of by Bochart and Vitringa. The Septuagint version is,

"I will bring upon the valley the Arabians, and they shall take it;'

and the Targum is,

"their border, which is by the western sea, shall be taken from them.'


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Therefore the abundance they have gained, and that which they have laid up, shall they carry away to the i brook of the willows.

(i) To hide themselves and their goods there.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Therefore — because of the devastation of the land.

abundance — literally, “that which is over and above” the necessaries of life.

brook of … willows — The fugitives flee from Nimrim, where the waters have failed, to places better watered. Margin has “valley of Arabians”; that is, to the valley on the boundary between them and Arabia-Petraea; now Wady-el Arabah. “Arabia” means a “desert.”


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-15.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Therefore the abundance they have gotten, and that which they have laid up, shall they carry away to the brook of the willows.

They — Their enemies.

Brook — Possibly he means some such river which ran into Euphrates, and so gave them opportunity of carrying their spoils by water unto Babylon.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-15.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

7.Therefore what every one hath left. (244) This corresponds to the ordinary expression, (Ce qu’il aura espargne ,) Whatever he shall have spared. He means the riches that are laid up, and describes what usually happens in countries which are invaded by an enemy. All the inhabitants are wont to convey their riches elsewhere, and to lay them up in some safe place, that they may afterwards bring them back when peace has been restored.

To the brook of the willows. He means that they will have no storehouse, no fortress in which they can lay them up with safety; so that they will be compelled to hide them among the willows. This certainly is the lowest wretchedness, when the enemy is attacking us, and we can find no storehouse for laying up those things which we have collected with great industry. These willows were probably situated in some remote and sequestered place. Others explain it as referring to enemies, that they will bring the fruits of their robbery to the brook, to divide among themselves the general plunder.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-15.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 15:7 Therefore the abundance they have gotten, and that which they have laid up, shall they carry away to the brook of the willows.

Ver. 7. Therefore the abundance they have gotten.] Here the prophet seemeth to tax the covetousness of the Moabites, qui coacervandis thesauris operam dederint, who made it their work to hoard and heap up riches.

And that which they have laid up.] Heb., Their visitation; that is, their treasures, which they often looked upon.

Shall they carry away to the brook of the willows.] The Moabites shall cast it into the water, as hoping there to find it again when the enemy was gone. Or, Shall they (the Assyrians) carry away to the valley of the Arabians, who were their confederates, and for such good offices spared (as Herodotus saith, lib. iii.), that they might keep and convey home for them the spoils they had taken from other nations. (a)


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-15.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Shall they, to wit, their enemies, which is plainly implied,

carry away to the brook of the willows; unto some brook or river having great numbers of willows growing by it, by which they might convey them to some eminent and strong city built upon the same river. Possibly he means some such river which ran into Euphrates, and so gave them opportunity of carrying their spoils by water unto Babylon. Though the words may be rendered, into the valley of the Arabians; whither the spoils might be first carried, in order to their transportation into Assyria or Chaldea; for part of Arabia lay between Moab and those countries. But the former translation seems better, because these very words are so rendered, Leviticus 23:40.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-15.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Therefore such wealth as they have accumulated,

And that which they have laid up,

They will carry away,

To the Brook of the Willows.’

Their only hope is escape across the border. This is the sad sight of a stream of refugees carrying all their earthly possessions as they stumble on their way to the south hoping to find refuge. The Brook of the Willows (or ‘Ravine of the Poplars’) is probably the Brook Zered on the southern border (compare Amos 6:14 - ‘the Brook of the Arabah’).


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/isaiah-15.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7. Brook of the willows — Probably a wady in the vicinity of Nimrim, where are remains of a former town site; not a place in Edom, as held by some. To this place they take with them in their flight all gathered stores. (Land of Moab, pp. 72, 82.)


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/isaiah-15.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Willows. That is, as some say, the waters of Babylon; others render it a valley of the Arabians, (Challoner) or "of crows," to which their bodies will be exposed, chap. lvii. 6.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-15.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

brook of the willows: or valley of the Arabians. Probably the Wady-el-Ahsy separating Kerek from Djebal, or the brook Zered of Deuteronomy 2:13, Deuteronomy 2:14.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Therefore the abundance they have gotten, and that which they have laid up, shall they carry away to the brook of the willows.

Therefore - Because of the devastation of the land.

The abundance they have gotten - Hebrew, yitraah (Hebrew #3502), 'left;' i:e., that which is over and above the necessaries of life.

Shall they carry away to the brook of the willows. The fugitives flee from Nimrim, where the waters have failed, to places better watered. Hebrew, nachal ha'arabim: margin, 'valley of the Arabians' - i:e. to the valley on the boundary between them and Arabia Petrea; now Wady-el-Arabah. Arabia means a desert.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) Therefore the abundance . . .—The picture of the flight is completed. The fugitives carry with them all that they can collect together of their household goods, and bear them in their flight.

To the brook of the willows.—This, which has been variously translated as (1) “the torrent of the poplars,” or (2) “the Arabians,” or (3) “of the wilderness,” was probably the Wady el Achsar, where a stream falls into the Dead Sea, between the territory of Moab and Edom, the brook Zered of Numbers 21:12, Deuteronomy 2:13. It is obviously named here as being the point where the fugitives pass the boundary of their own lands. With less probability it has been taken as a poetical equivalent for the Euphrates (Psalms 137:2).


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Therefore the abundance they have gotten, and that which they have laid up, shall they carry away to the brook of the willows.
the abundance
5:29; 10:6,14; Nahum 2:12,13
to the
Psalms 137:1,2
brook of the willows
or, valley of the Arabians.

Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 15:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-15.html.

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