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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 45:24

 

 

"They will say of Me, `Only in the LORD are righteousness and strength.' Men will come to Him, And all who were angry at Him will be put to shame.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Surely, shall one say, In the Lord have I righteousness and strength "Saying, Only to Jehovah belongeth salvation and power" - A MS. omits לי li, unto me; and instead of אמר לי li amar, he said or shall say unto me, the Septuagint read, in the copy which they used, לאמר lemor, saying. For יבא yabo, He shall come, in the singular, twelve MSS. three ancient) read יבאו yabeu, plural; and a letter is erased at the end of the word in two others: and so the Alexandrine copy of the Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate read it. For צדקות tsedakoth plural, two MSS. read צדקת tsidkath, singular; and so the Septuagint, Syriac, and Chaldee.

Probably these are the words of Cyrus, who acknowledged that all his success came from Jehovah. And this sentiment is in effect contained in his decree or proclamation, Ezra 1:2; : "Thus saith Cyrus, king of Persia, The Lord God of heaven hath given me all the kingdoms of the earth, "etc.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-45.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Surely, shall one say - Margin, ‹He shall say of me, In the Lord is all righteousness and strength.‘ The design of the verse is, to set forth more fully the effect of the prevalence of the true religion; and the main thought is, that there shall be an universal acknowledgment that salvation and strength were in Yahweh alone. Idols and people could not save; and salvation was to be traced to Yahweh only. A literal translation of the passage would be, ‹Truly in Jehovah, he said unto me,‘ or it is said unto me, that is, I heard it said, ‹is righteousness and strength,‘ that is, this would be everywhere the prevailing sentiment that righteousness and strength were to be found in Yahweh alone. The sense is, first, that it was by him alone that they could be pardoned and justified; and, secondly, that it was by him alone that they could obtain strength to meet their enemies, to overcome their sins, to discharge their duties, to encounter temptations, to hear afflictions, and to support them in death. These two things, righteousness and strength, are all that man needs. The whole of religion consists essentially in the feeling that righteousness and strength are to be found in God our Saviour. The Septuagint renders this, ‹Every tongue shall swear to God, saying, Righteousness and glory shall come unto him, and all those who make distinctions among them shall be ashamed.‘

Even to him shall men come - For the purpose of being saved (see the notes at Isaiah 2:3).

And all that are incensed against him - All that are opposed to his government and laws.

Shall be ashamed - (See the note at Isaiah 45:16). The enemies of God shall see their own feebleness and folly; and they shall be ashamed that they have endeavored to oppose one so mighty and so glorious as the living God. The multitudes that have in various ways resisted him shall see the folly of their course, and be overwhelmed with shame that they have dared to lift the hand against the God that made the heavens. Jarchi renders this, ‹All who have opposed themselves to God, shall come to him, led by penitence on account of the things which they have done, and shall be ashamed.‘


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-45.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Isaiah 45:24

Surely shall one say, In the Lord have I righteousness and strength

Our righteousness and strength

It is important to us, in reading the Old Testament, and more particularly its prophetical portions, to take with us as our guide the well-known statement of the angel to the evangelist John: “The testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy.
” The preceding verse contains one of the most remarkable predictions concerning the kingdom of Christ in the Old Testament, and in this prediction the kingdom of Christ is described as becoming universal and permanent. After such a prediction as that, we might have expected to find the prophet speaking of numbers being brought to acknowledge and to bow the knee to Christ. Instead of that, however, he speaks of one--a single, isolated, unknown individual; and he introduces to us this solitary individual as if the state of his mind, the subjugation of his heart to Christ, were an indication of the complete fulfilment of the most glorious prophecies of the universality of Christ’s kingdom. In looking for the progress of the Redeemer’s kingdom, we are too much disposed to undervalue individual conversions. We may trace the progress of Christ’s kingdom in the subjugation of a single heart to the Saviour.

I. THE STATE OF THIS INDIVIDUAL’S MIND IN RELATION TO THE RIGHTEOUSNESS OF CHRIST. The term “righteousness” is one of those words in the Bible which it is of the first importance that you should thoroughly understand. It includes all that the Lord Jesus Christ has done and suffered for us. Mark three stages in the history of this man’s mind.

1. The first thing a man does when he is awakened to a sense of his need of some righteousness, is to try to find it in himself. But when once brought to see his own righteousness aright, he sees innumerable defects.

2. Look at the second step in this man’s history. We might have expected that the man would have received this righteousness with promptitude; but he sets himself as deliberately against the righteousness of God as against the law of God. Long will he struggle against the friendly hand that would lead him to the Cross of Christ; but when brought there, he will exclaim, “In the Lord have I righteousness and strength.”

3. Mark the third stage of the human mind in reference to the righteousness of Christ. This man appropriates it.

II. HIS STATE OF FEELING IN REFERENCE TO THE STRENGTH OF CHRIST. This latter word, “strength,” conveys an idea totally distinct from, and additional to, that suggested by the first. By the “righteousness” of Christ we always understand what the Lord Jesus has done for us; by the “strength” of Christ we always understand what the Lord has done in us; and it is the combination of these two that works out, in all its completeness, the salvation of an individual sinner. When he is first awakened to a sense of his own condition, he naturally tries to put forth his own strength, but he soon discovers that this is the wrong order. It is just in this way that the conviction is forced upon his mind that he has no strength in himself, but that there is strength for him in Christ. If you have sought Christ’s strength and are conscious that you possess it, you must arise with vigour in the strength of the new man; and then, and not till then, will you go forth free. Mark the connection between the strength of Christ and the righteousness of Christ. The righteousness of Christ is laid hold of first, the strength of Christ is appropriated next. “Unto Him shall men come.” That is the practical conclusion of the whole matter.

Five Divine declarations

God s power over mankind is exerted in a way of grace, although it is also true that His power is put forth in a way of judgment towards those who reject His mercy. I read, with delight, the expressions of my text as the decrees, and determinations, and promises, and declarations of the God of grace, who affirms that men shall say, “In the Lord have we righteousness and strength,” &c. There are five Divine declarations in the text.

I. THERE SHALL BE A PEOPLE WHO SHALL OWN THE TRUTH CONCERNING GOD. Our version says, “Surely, shall one say, In the Lord have I righteousness and strength”; but there are other readings which appear to be more accurate. “Men shall say, In the Lord is righteousness and strength,” would be quite as correct a rendering, or even more so. It means that there shall be a people who shall confess that in God there is righteousness and strength.

1. They shall see these to be His attributes.

2. They will see that all their righteousness and strength must be found in God.

3. They shall be prepared openly to avow it. “Surely shall one say,” &c.

II. Men will not only own the truth concerning God, but THEY WILL ACT UPON IT. “Even to Him shall men come.”

III. THOSE WHO DO COME SHALL BE ASHAMED OF THEIR FORMER OPPOSITION. “All that are incensed against Him shall be ashamed.”

1. There are some who are angry with God’s providence.

2. Some are incensed against God because of His law and its penalty,

3. Others are incensed against God because of the great plan of salvation.

4. Some are even incensed against the Saviour Himself.

IV. The fourth Divine declaration is, that THE LORD’S PEOPLE SHALL ALL BE JUSTIFIED. “In the Lord shall all the seed of Israel be justified.”

V. THOSE WHO COME TO CHRIST, AND ARE JUSTIFIED IN HIM, SHALL GLORY. What does the text mean when it says that they shall glory? Sometimes, when I have been preaching in Wales, or among Methodists, when I have set before them good, rich, Gospel truth, perhaps two or three have shouted, at the same time, “Glory!” And though it has not increased the solemnity of the service, it has added a good deal of vivacity to it. And, really, when we see what Divine grace has done for us, we often feel inclined to cry out, “Glory! Glory be to God!”

1. Have not many of you felt the glory in your soul, even if you have not uttered it with your mouth?

2. But the Lord’s true people will not keep that glory all to themselves. They shall so glory that they shall speak about it to others.

3. Those who truly know Christ will glory in Him alone. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

Even to Him shall men come.

Men coming to Christ

The doctrinal truth, deduced from these words, is the certainty of men, as sinners, coming to Christ, and being saved in Him. It is but necessary to direct attention to the meaning and import of the terms, in the text, as seen in their connection with the context.

I. The word “HIM” viewed in its connection, points out several important particulars concerning Christ, His person, office, and work.

1. His person. The word “Him” refers to Jehovah, as its antecedent. Redemption is the work of Jehovah. Christ is Jehovah--our great God and Saviour. But Christ is man, too. This constitutes the glory of Christ’s person. He is a God-man.

2. His office The Mediator between God and man.

3. His work. The law is obeyed, magnified’ and made honourable, its penalty borne, infinite justice satisfied, and everlasting righteousness brought in.

II. They COME to Him. To come to Christ is to believe upon Him.

III. They SHALL come. The language expresses certainty. This certainty depends upon--

1. The purpose of God.

2. The work of Christ

3. The agency of the Holy Spirit.

IV. MEN shall come. No sinner who comes to Christ will be lost. Men do come to Christ and are saved.

1. They are justified.

2. Sanctified.

3. Preserved. (J. I. Dunlop.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Isaiah 45:24". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/isaiah-45.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Surely, shall one say, in the Lord have I righteousness and strength,.... That is, one and everyone of these that shall be brought to submit to Christ, and to confess him, shall declare it as their faith, that in Christ alone is their "righteousness or righteousnesses"F6צדקות "justitiae", Montanus; "omnis justitia", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator. ; that they have a full and complete righteousness in him, and which serves for many; consisting of the holiness of his nature, the obedience of his life, and his sufferings of death; by which the law is honoured, justice satisfied, God is well pleased, and they are acquainted and discharged; and which is pure, perfect, and everlasting, is given them of grace, and entitles them to eternal life; and this they have in Christ as their covenant head and representative, and which they come to have by being in him: it is not inherent in them, but is in Christ, by whom it is wrought out, and becomes theirs by the imputation of it to them, and which they receive by faith; and this is an act of faith concerning it here expressed, and which declares the certainty of it, and of interest in it, and excludes all other: for it may be rendered, "only in the Lord", &c.F7אד ביהוה "tantummodo in Jehova", Junius & Tremellius; "duntaxat in Domino", Tigurine version; "tantam", Cocceius. So some in Vatablus. ; and seems to be spoken with great joy, in an exulting way, and what may be said at all times; for this righteousness is always in Christ, and "strength" likewise to enable them to exercise every grace; to do the will and work of God; to bear afflictions; to withstand Satan's temptations, and oppose their own corruptions; and to which they have not sufficient strength in themselves, but there is enough in Christ. Some take these to be the words of the prophet, and differently interpret them. Some thus, as Abendana observes,

"saith the prophet, these future things I know not in a way of wisdom, but by the Lord, who saith unto me, my God of righteousness and strength.'

Aben Ezra thus,

"surely in the Lord that speaketh with me alone are righteousness and strength.'

Joseph Kimchi takes it to be in the form of an oath,

"the prophet said, I swear by the name of the Lord, that unto me he saith, righteousness and strength unto him shall come; as if he had said, the author or doer of righteousness and strength shall draw near to him, and all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed.'

Even to him shall men come: or everyone of the above persons; they shall come to Christ, not merely to his word and ordinances, but to himself by faith; for righteousness and strength; for peace and pardon; for spiritual rest, joy, and comfort; for food and clothing; for all supplies of grace, and for eternal life; or if not in a way of grace now, they shall come to him, and appear before him at the last judgment, whether they will or not.

And all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed; that are incensed against his person, his deity, personality, and divine sonship; against his blood, righteousness, sacrifice, and satisfaction; against his offices, kingdom, and glory; these shall be ashamed, either when they are convinced of the truth of these things now, or however when they shall appear in his glory at the last day. Kimchi connects this verse with the preceding, thus,

"he saith, every tongue shall swear verily by the Lord alone, and not by another god; and so saith God, I have righteousness and strength to give to them that serve me; and all the people who are incensed against me, and reject my service unto that day, then shall they come unto him, and confess before him, and shall be ashamed for what they have done.'

The Targum is,

"in his word they shall confess, and all the people shall be confounded with their idols, who rush upon his people.'


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-45.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Surely, c shall [one] say, in the LORD have I righteousness and strength: [even] to him shall [men] come; and all that are d incensed against him shall be ashamed.

(c) Meaning the faithful will feel and confess this.

(d) All the contemners of God.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-45.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Rather, “Only in Jehovah shall men say of me (this clause is parenthetical), is there righteousness” (which includes salvation, Isaiah 45:21, “a just God and a Savior,” Isaiah 46:13), etc. [Maurer].

strength — namely, to save.

shall men come — Those who have set themselves up against God shall come to Him in penitence for the past (Isaiah 19:22).

ashamed — (Isaiah 45:16; Isaiah 54:17; Isaiah 41:11).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-45.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Surely, shall one say, in the LORD have I righteousness and strength: even to him shall men come; and all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed.

In the Lord — By or from God alone, or the Messiah, who is the true Jehovah as well as man.

Righteousness — To justify me from all things which I could not be justified by the law of Moses.

Strength — Support and assistance to bear all my burdens, overcome all my enemies, and perform all my duties.

Men — The Gentiles shall come to Christ.

Ashamed — But all his implacable enemies shall be brought to shame.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-45.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

24.Surely in Jehovah. He shews what is the nature of true faith and of the true worship of God; that is, when we not only acknowledge, or perceive by the understanding, that there is a God, but likewise feel what he wishes to be towards us. Whoever shall be satisfied with a bare knowledge departs very widely from faith, which must invite us to God in such a manner that we shall feel him to be in us. In like manner Paul wishes that

“Christ should dwell in the hearts of believers through faith.” (Ephesians 3:17.)

He who imagines that God sits unemployed in heaven either will not humble himself sincerely before him, or will not make an open and sincere profession.

Righteousness and strength. As these are the two principal parts of our salvation, when believers acknowledge that they receive both of them from God, they ascribe to him the undivided praise of a happy life, and testify that by nature they do not possess that which they acknowledge that they owe to his grace. Thus they own that in themselves they have nothing either of “righteousness” or of “strength,” but seek them in God alone, that he may not be defrauded of his right.

To him shall he come. Here commentators differ; but, for my own part, I take a simple view of this passage as relating to believers who submit themselves to God, so as to enable us to perceive the nature of the contrast between them and rebels, who do not cease obstinately to resist God. I explain it thus: “They who shall confess that their righteousness is placed in God will approach to him.” He means that we obtain access to God through faith, so that they who perceive that their righteousness is placed in him, feel that he is present; and indeed no man, if he be not reconciled to God, will ever approach to him willingly, but, on the contrary, all who dread his majesty will fly to the greatest possible distance from him. Thus the Prophet applauds the very delightful result of grace, because it will unite to God those men who were formerly driven away from him by their wickedness; and to this corresponds what is said by the Psalmist,

“Thou art the God that heareth prayer; to thee shall all flesh come.” (Psalms 65:2.)

But all who defy him shall be ashamed. After having testified that God wishes to gather strangers from their dispersion, that he may bring them into a state of intimate friendship with himself, he threatens vengeance against despisers, who, being without God, and despising God, give the reins to their wicked passions, and wallow in the enjoyments of the world. As it is only by faith that we obey God, so it is by unbelief alone that Isaiah declares his anger to be provoked; while he distinguishes all unbelievers by this mark, that they are disobedient to God, and even challenge him to a contest. Although they now use the language of triumph, the Prophet declares that they shall be clothed with shame and disgrace.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-45.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 45:24 Surely, shall [one] say, in the LORD have I righteousness and strength: [even] to him shall [men] come; and all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed.

Ver. 24. Surely shall one say.] This shall be the Christian confession, "In the Lord have I righteousness," &c. - "Righteousness," i.e., mercy to those that come over to him, and strength to enable them to come, as the sea sendeth out waters to fetch us to it.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-45.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Shall one say; or, shall he say; each or every one of those whom he now said that they should bow their knees to God, and swear by him, Isaiah 45:23. Or, it shall be said; such active verbs being oft used impersonally.

In the Lord; by or from God alone, or the Messiah, who is the true Jehovah as well as man. Have I righteousness, to justify me from all things, from which I could not be justified by the law of Moses, as is said, Acts 13:39. This plainly points us to the Messiah, whose very name is, The Lord our Righteousness, Jeremiah 23:6, and whose great business it was to bring in everlasting righteousness, Daniel 9:24, and who is made unto us of God righteousness, 1 Corinthians 1:30. Strength; support and assistance to bear all my burdens, and overcome all my enemies, and perform all my duties. The sense is, the Gentiles shall expect and obtain from Christ both justification, or forgiveness of sins by his blood, and sanctification by his Spirit.

To him shall men come; the Gentiles shall come to God and Christ, either,

1. By constraint or necessity, to be judged by him at the last day; or,

2. Willingly, by prayer to seek, and by faith to receive, righteousness and strength from him; which seems better to agree with the foregoing clause, which speaks of true believers only. Coming to Christ is put for believing on him, Matthew 11:28 John 5:40 6:35-37, and elsewhere.

And all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed; or, but (as this particle is oft rendered)

all that are, & c. But all his implacable enemies shall be brought to shame and punishment.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-45.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

men come = one come. Hebrew text is singular, as in preceding clause; but plural in Isaiah 45:1.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-45.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Surely, shall one say, in the LORD have I righteousness and strength: even to him shall men come; and all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed.

Surely, shall (one) say, In the Lord have I righteousness and strength - or, as the Chaldaic, 'Only in Yahweh shall men say of me (this clause is parenthetical) is there righteousness' (which includes salvation, Isaiah 45:21, "a just God and a Saviour;" Isaiah 46:13), etc. (Maurer.) But the accent separates "say" from 'to me' (Hebrew, li); and the Vulgate supports the English version. Literally, "Surely," or 'Only in the Lord (there are) to me (shall [one] say) righteousnesses (i:e., all righteousness, imputed, as also imparted, so as to be inherent) and strength' (for enabling me to obey God). So DeDieu.

(Even) to him shall (men) come. Those who have set themselves up against God shall come to Him in penitence for the past (Isaiah 19:22).

All that are incensed against him shall be ashamed - (Isaiah 45:16; Isaiah 54:17; Isaiah 41:11.)


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-45.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) Surely, shall one say.—The prophet hears that confession as uttered in the far-off time.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-45.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Surely, shall one say, in the LORD have I righteousness and strength: even to him shall men come; and all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed.
Surely, etc
or, Surely he shall say of me, In the Lord is all righteousness and strength. in the.
25; 54:17; 61:10; Jeremiah 23:5,6; 1 Corinthians 1:30; 2 Corinthians 5:21; 2 Peter 1:1; *marg:
righteousness
Heb. righteousnesses. strength.
2 Corinthians 12:9,10; Ephesians 3:16; Philippians 4:13; Colossians 1:11; 2 Timothy 4:17,18; Zechariah 10:6,12
even
55:5; 60:9; Genesis 49:10; Matthew 11:27,28; John 7:37; 12:32; Ephesians 6:10; Revelation 22:17
and all
41:11; Psalms 2:1-12; 21:8,9; 72:9; 110:2; Luke 13:17; 19:27; Revelation 11:18

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-45.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Isaiah 45:24

"Surely, shall one say, in the Lord have I righteousness and strength." Isaiah 45:24

Have you yet learned that you are a sinner in the sight of God? Have you ever felt the length, breadth, and spirituality of his holy law? Do you feel in your very soul that without Christ"s righteousness being imputed to you, and his blood being sprinkled upon your conscience, you must die in your sins and never reach the heavenly shore? Has this ever been, or is it still a matter of anxious solicitude to you? Has it ever caused sighs and groans to come out of your heart? Has the spirit of prayer ever been given, to make you plead with the Lord for the forgiveness of your sins, through the merits of a crucified Savior? And have you any hope but in his blood, righteousness, and finished work?

Now if the Lord has been pleased to exercise your soul in this way, if he has not yet granted the longing desire of your heart, he certainly will in due time reveal his dear Son in you as the God-man who has saved you from death and hell; he will apply his atoning blood to your conscience, bring near his glorious righteousness, shed abroad his dying love, give and strengthen faith, and draw it forth into a blessed assurance of your saving interest in the Son of his love.

Or if your manifestations should not be very bright and conspicuous, he will give you a good hope through grace, as an anchor of the soul both sure and steadfast; and will draw up your affections to that blessed Lord who sits at the right hand of the Father in power, majesty, and glory. And as he does this, he enables the believer thus favored and blessed to take these words into his lips, "In the Lord have I righteousness."

He cannot say it before. He may know that there is no righteousness but in the Lord; he may have utterly renounced his own; he may have sunk very deep into guilt and bondage; but until the Lord the Spirit is pleased to liberate him, he cannot come forth into liberty; until he has the witness of the Spirit he cannot cry, "Abba, Father."

But when the Lord is pleased to bring near his righteousness, to reveal his dying love, and to shed it abroad in his heart by divine power, then he can say, "In the Lord have I righteousness." And when he has this, he wants no other; it is complete, which no other can be. It is acceptable to God; it is available in the courts of heaven; it will bear him up through all the storms of time; it will smooth a dying pillow, and land him safely in a glorious eternity.

"In the Lord alone are righteousness and strength." Isaiah 45:24

The same blessed Spirit who shines as with a ray of light and life into the conscience, to make it feel the guilt of sin, the curse of the law, and its own miserable state as a transgressor, leads it also into this secret, that it has no strength. Have you never felt that you were utterly powerless—that you would believe, but could not; would hope, but could not; would love, but could not; would keep God"s word, but could not; would obey his commandments, but were not able? Has a sense of your own miserable impotency and thorough helplessness never pressed you down almost to despair?

You felt sure that there was a faith, a hope, a love, a blessing, and a blessedness in the truth of God; a pardon, a peace, a heavenly joy; an assurance of salvation, a union and communion with the Lord Jesus, which you saw, but could not reach. You felt that if you could believe, all would be well, but believe you could not. Thus you learned you had no strength, and as we learn our weakness in this way, we begin to learn also in whom is our strength; and as we get access to Christ by a living faith, we receive strength out of him for a supply of our spiritual necessities.

Despairing of all strength in self, we look to the Lord Jesus Christ, at the right hand of the Father, to give us his; we lift up our prayers and supplications to the great High Priest over the house of God, to strengthen us with strength in our soul; and when he is pleased, in answer to prayer, to send down his Spirit and grace, we are "strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power unto all patience and patience with joyfulness." This is being "strong in the Lord and in the power of his might;" and a being "strengthened with might by his Spirit in the inner man."

"Even to him shall men come." Isaiah 45:24

The Lord has given an absolute promise that "in the Lord shall all the seed of Israel be justified, and shall glory." And no less absolute is the addition, and as it were divine corollary to that promise, "To him shall men come." And who gives them will and power to come? The Father himself, according to the Lord"s own words, "No man can come to me except the Father who has sent me draws him." But will the Father draw all the chosen vessels of mercy to Jesus? Surely he will; for the Lord adds, "It is written in the prophets, And they shall be all taught of God. Every man therefore that has heard, and has learned of the Father, comes unto me" ( John 6:45).

Every act of faith whereby you look to Jesus is a coming. Every beam and ray of hope in his blood and righteousness is a coming. Every sigh, groan, or tear; every contrite feeling, every breathing desire of a broken heart, all are a coming. So that though you may not be able to realize as fully as you could wish a saving interest in the former part of the promise, "Surely, shall one say, in the Lord have I righteousness and strength;" yet there is wrought in your soul by a divine power that secret coming whereby you have a manifested saving interest in the second part of it, "Even to him shall men come."

We cannot come until we are drawn. "Draw me," says the bride, "we will run after you" ( Song of Solomon 1:4). "The Lord has appeared of old unto me, saying, Yes, I have loved you with an everlasting love, therefore with loving-kindness have I drawn you." When we are drawn, then we come, and cannot but come. It is good to come. Even those who have received must be ever coming. We get nothing but by coming. Our daily life, as one of faith and hope, is a life of coming. Our continual prayer is a continual coming. For the language of the Church still Isaiah , "And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whoever will, let him take the water of life freely." Thus must we be ever coming that we may be ever receiving; and so everything that makes us come has in it a real or an implied blessing. Nor will you come in vain, be you who or what you may. "For him that comes to me," the blessed Lord himself has said, "I will in no wise cast out."


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Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Isaiah 45:24". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/isaiah-45.html.

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