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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 46:10

 

 

Declaring the end from the beginning, And from ancient times things which have not been done, Saying, `My purpose will be established, And I will accomplish all My good pleasure';

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Declaring the end from the beginning - Foretelling accurately the course of future events. This is an argument to which God often appeals in proof that he is the only true God (see Isaiah 41:22-23; Isaiah 43:12; Isaiah 44:26).

My counsel shall stand - My purpose, my design, my will. The phrase ‹shall stand‘ means that it shall be stable, settled, fixed, established. This proves:

1. That God has a purpose or plan in regard to human affairs. If he had not, he could not predict future events, since a contingent event cannot be foreknown and predicted; that is, it cannot be foretold that an event shall certainly occur in one way, when by the very supposition of its being contingent it may happen either that way, or some other way, or not at all.

2. That God‘s plan will not be frustrated. He has power enough to secure the execution of his designs, and he will exert that power in order that all his plans may be accomplished. We may observe, also, that it is a matter of unspeakable joy that God has a plan, and that it will be executed. For

(1) If there were no plan in relation to human things, the mind could find no rest. If there was no evidence that One Mind presided over human affairs; that an infinitely wise plan had been formed, and that all things had been adjusted so as best to secure the ultimate accomplishment of that plan, everything would have the appearance of chaos, and the mind must be filled with doubts and distractions. But our anxieties vanish in regard to the apparent irregularities and disorders of the universe, when we feel that all things are under the direction of an Infinite Mind, and will be made to accomplish his plans, and further his great designs.

(2) If his plans were not accomplished, there would be occasion of equal doubt and dismay. If there was any power that could defeat the purposes of God; if there was any stubbornness of matter, or any inflexible perverseness in the nature of mind; if there were any unexpected and unforeseen extraneous causes that could interpose to thwart his plans, then the mind must be full of agitation and distress. But the moment it can fasten on the conviction that God has formed a plan that embraces all things, and that all things which occur will be in some way made tributary to that plan, that moment the mind can be calm in resignation to his holy will.

And I will do all my pleasure - I will accomplish all my wish, or effect all my desire. The word rendered here ‹pleasure‘ (חפץ chepēts ) means properly delight or pleasure 1 Samuel 15:22; Psalm 1:2; Psalm 16:3; Ecclesiastes 5:4; Ecclesiastes 12:10; then desire, wish, will Job 31:16; and then business, cause, affairs Isaiah 53:10. Here it means that God would accomplish everything which was to him an object of desire; everything which he wished, or willed. And why should he not? Who has power to hinder or prevent him Romans 9:19? And why should not we rejoice that he will do all that is pleasing to him? What better evidence have we that it is desirable that anything should be done, than that it is agreeable, or pleasing to God? What better security can we have that it is right, than that he wills it? What more substantial and permanent ground of rejoicing is there in regard to anything, than that it is such as God prefers, loves, and wills?


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-46.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Isaiah 46:10

Declaring the end from the beginning

God as a Worker

God is not a passive existent, resting idly in immensity.
He is essentially, incessantly, everlastingly active. He “fainteth not, neither is weary.” He has done wonderful things, and He will do wonders more. The text suggests four things in relation to God, as a Worker in the future.

I. HE KNOWS ALL THAT IS TO BE DONE IN THE FUTURE. “Declaring the end from the beginning.” When we embark in an enterprise, difficulties start up in our path that never entered into our calculation and baffle us. Not so with God. When He began the work of redemption, He saw all the infidelities, superstitions, depravities, devils, and hells that would oppose Him.

II. HE HAS REVEALED ALL THAT IS TO BE DONE IN THE FUTURE. “Declaring,” &c. Applying the words to redemption, He has declared in many a grand prophetic passage what will be its end, sweeping all wrongs and woes, all sins and sufferings, from this planet, and filling it with Christly virtues and heavenly blessedness. Yes, and more, peopling heaven with untold millions of souls. His declaration of “the end” is very explicit, very frequent, very encouraging.

III. HE WILL EXECUTE ALL THAT IS TO BE DONE IN THE FUTURE. “My counsel shall stand.” He will employ thousands of instrumentalities and ministries, but He will do it. They will work by His direction, and by His power. He will do it gradually and efficiently.

IV. HE HAS A PLEASURE IN ALL THAT IS TO BE DONE IN THE FUTURE. “I will do all My pleasure.” To re-create and re-paradise lost souls is His pleasure. He rejoices over repentant sinners. (Homilist.)

My counsel shall stand

God’s standing counsel

To form a plan and then to alter it, or to have a fixed plan and to fail in it, is one of the many sad imperfections of humanity. In the first ease, some new light springs up which was not evident before. In the second some difficulty arises, which, as a mountain, hinders the carrying out of the plan. But who can suppose any of this in God--a Being of Infinite Power? (Isaiah 40:15-17.) With Him thereis no difficulty. He is a Being of Infinite wisdom. Nothing escapes Him. The past, the present, the future are an everlasting now. Unchanged are His resolves, as His nature is unchangeable (Psalms 33:11; Proverbs 19:21; Proverbs 21:30; Acts 5:39; Hebrews 6:17).

I. THE DECLARATION.

1. We see this exemplified in the works of nature. Such is the regularity of all that the Great Mechanist is too usually lost sight of in the very machinery of His hands, as if it worked by its own power, regulated itself.

2. Still more distinctly do we see this declaration in the works of Providence. Wheel runs within wheel, but He is in every wheel, whatever its direction, whatever its movement. He is directly or indirectly in it. Look at Cyrus. Look at the history of Joseph. Look at Jesus Himself. (Acts 2:23; Acts 3:18; Acts 4:26-28.)

3. But if He does all His pleasure in His works of creation and providence, how much more in the greater, infinitely greater displays of Himself in His grace, which is His glory! (2 Timothy 1:9.)

II. THE GROUND OF SUCH DECLARATION. “I will do all My pleasure.” It is His own work. True, He works by means, and most commonly by human instrumentality. But it is in all respects His own work.

1. The subject has an awful look upon any who have been trifling. “My counsel shall stand, and I will do all My pleasure. Look at the fall. Look at the sin and sinfulness of this polluted world. These are but a fearful comment on “My counsel shall stand.” “In the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.” “By one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin.” Look at the flood. Look at Babylon. Look at Jerusalem.

2. The subject is most encouraging to every returning sinner.

3. This is most consolatory to the tried saint.

4. Beware of any abuse of this great and glorious truth. If God’s counsel standeth fast, and He does all His pleasure, it is that God who delights in human instrumentality. (J. H. Evans, M.A.)


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Isaiah 46:10". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/isaiah-46.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Declaring the end from the beginning,.... The end of the Jewish state, both as a church, and a commonwealth, from the first settlement of it in the times of Moses, and by him, Deuteronomy 32:29. The end of the world, and all things in it, as early as the times of Enoch, the seventh from Adam, Judges 1:14. The end and issue of every event, at least of many very remarkable and momentous ones, before they came to pass; and particularly things relating to Christ, the beginning and end; the fulfilling end of the moral law for righteousness; the scope and design of the ceremonial law, to which that tended, and in which it issued; as well as the end of the whole Scripture, of the prophecies and promises of it: and this end was declared very early, and spoken of by all the prophets that were from the beginning of the world; and which is a full proof of the omniscience of God, and so of his true deity, Luke 1:70.

And from the ancient times the things that are not yet done; that were not at this time done, though they are since: such as the captivity of the Jews, and their return from it; also the incarnation of Christ, his obedience and sufferings, and the glory that should follow; his resurrection, ascension, and session at the right hand of God; the work of redemption by him; the effusion of the Spirit; the spread of the Gospel among the Gentiles, and their conversion; and others which are now not yet done; as the conversion of the Jews in the latter day, and the bringing in the fulness of the Gentiles; the glory of the church in those times as to knowledge, peace, purity, power, and authority; the destruction of antichrist; and the second coming of the Messiah; all which have been declared from ancient times; and as the former have been accomplished, there is reason to believe the latter will:

saying, my counsel shall stand; the purposes and decrees of God, which are within himself, wisely formed by him, eternal and not frustrable; and which shall stand, or be accomplished, being the counsels of him who is all wise, all knowing, all powerful, unchangeable, true, and faithful; whether they respect the providence of God in relation to the world in general, and the government of it, or to particular persons, and their affairs, from the time of their birth to their death; or whether they respect his grace and goodness in the salvation of men; such as his purpose according to election, the covenant of his grace, redemption by Christ, the effectual calling, and eternal glorification; all which, as they are according to the will and counsel of God; stand firm and sure, and shall have their full accomplishment; see Psalm 33:11.

And I will do all my pleasure; as he has done in creation, and does in providence, so he has done, can do, and does in grace, in predestination and redemption, and in the effectual calling. And particularly this may refer to the deliverance of the Jews by Cyrus, a type of Christ, and deliverance by him, as follows:


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-46.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

(Isaiah 45:21; Isaiah 41:22, Isaiah 41:23; Isaiah 44:26).

yet — not in the Hebrew. Translate, “What had not been done” [Horsley].

do all my pleasure — (Isaiah 53:10; Romans 9:19).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-46.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure:

Declaring — Foretelling from the beginning of the world, future events which should happen in succeeding ages, even to the end of the world.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-46.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.Declaring from the beginning. He now explains more fully in what manner he wishes the Jews to remember the past time, namely, that they were taught by constant predictions, as far as was necessary for their advantage. But from this preface he immediately makes a transition to the hope of deliverance.

My counsel shall stand. We ought not to wonder that he repeats this so frequently, because it is very hard to persuade men of the truth of it. The people were not only slow to believe, but even obstinate; and therefore he reminds them that they had learned long ago, and not on one occasion only, how safe it is to place their confidence in God. Nor is it only his foreknowledge that is here extolled by him, but he says that he has testified by his prophets what he had decreed. Even the prophecies would have no certainty or solidity, if the same God who declares that this or that thing shall happen had not the events themselves in his power. At the same time, he states that he speaks according to truth and brings forward his decrees in all the prophecies, that the Jews may not hesitate to place a firm reliance, as soon as the prophets have spoken. But as I have already explained these subjects more largely, I now give nothing more than a brief view of them.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-46.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 46:10 Declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times [the things] that are not [yet] done, saying, My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure:

Ver. 10. Declaring the end from the beginning.] This foretelling of things future is a precellency in God above idols that he much standeth upon.

I will do all my pleasure.] What God pleaseth to do, there is no question but he is able to do. But they are out who argue from God’s power to his will.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-46.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Declaring the end from the beginning; foretelling from the beginning of the world, or from the beginning of your nation, those future events which should happen in succeeding ages, even to the end of the world, or to the end of your commonwealth; for such predictions we find delivered by Moses, the first founder of their commonwealth.

My counsel shall stand; as I will not, so no other power can, disappoint my purposes and predictions.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-46.html. 1685.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure:

Declaring the end from the beginning - (Isaiah 45:21; Isaiah 41:22-23; Isaiah 44:26.)

And from ancient times (the things) that are not (yet) - not in the Hebrew. Translate, 'what had not been done' (Horsley).

Do all my pleasure - (Isaiah 53:10; Romans 9:19.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-46.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure:
the end
41:22,23; 44:7; 45:21; Genesis 3:15; 12:2,3; 49:10,22-26; Numbers 24:17-24; Deuteronomy 4:24-31; 28:15-68; Acts 15:18
My counsel
11; 43:13; Psalms 33:11; 135:6; Proverbs 19:21; 21:30; Daniel 4:35; Acts 3:23; Acts 4:27,28; 5:39; Romans 11:33,34; Ephesians 1:9-11; Hebrews 6:17

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-46.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Isaiah 46:10

"My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure." Isaiah 46:10

There is one grand idea running through the whole of Scripture from Genesis to Revelation; and this one grand idea runs through every part of the sacred page, and, like a golden band, unites the whole together. What is this one grand thought?

God has many thoughts as well as we, for he tells us that "the thoughts of his heart stand to all generations." But we read also in the same verse of "the counsel of the Lord, which stands forever;" and elsewhere of his "working all things after the counsel of his own will" ( Psalm 33:11; Ephesians 1:11). Thus in the mind of God, as well as in the mode of his subsistence, there is unity and variety. There is his one thought, and his many thoughts; for though his thoughts are many, his counsel is but one; and this counsel is the exaltation and glorification of his dear Son. It may be as well briefly to trace this unity of thought and the variety of its expression. We see it, then, first expressed in the creation of the first Prayer of Manasseh , when God made him "in his own image, after his own likeness." There was the expression of God"s one thought; for Adam the first was a type of Adam the second, and as Christ was by lineal descent "the son of Adam," there was a foreview in the creation of the first man of the incarnation of God"s dear Song of Solomon , who is the brightness of his glory and the express image of his Person.

Now next observe how all things were put under Adam"s feet, and he thus made the visible head of creation. Read this exaltation of Adam in the light of Psalm 8:1-9 , and you will see how the inspired Psalmist, as interpreted by the Apostle ( Hebrews 2:7-9), viewed Adam, in having all things put under his feet, as a type of Jesus, whom God has crowned with glory and honor, set him over the works of his hands, and put all things in subjection under his feet. Look next at the first promise given after the fall, that the seed of the woman should bruise the serpent"s head. There we have God"s one thought again expressed, his dominant counsel in the incarnation of his dear Song of Solomon , as the seed of the woman, to bruise Satan"s head. Look at Noah preserved in the ark with his family when the rest of the world was swept away by the deluge, that from the loins of Adam might come the promised seed.

Take the case of Abraham, called by a special calling, that in him and his seed all the nations of the earth might be blessed. Here we have again God"s one thought. Take, again, the whole of the Levitical dispensation. Every rite, every sacrifice, every type, every ordinance, all still bear the same stamp of God"s one thought, and indeed every part of Scripture is but an exposition of this one thought of God"s heart, of this one counsel of his eternal will.

The word of God is a total mystery to us, and we see no beauty or harmony in the various books of either the Old Testament or the New until we see the mind of God in it, gather up God"s thoughts, and especially that grand thought which I have spoken of as binding the whole together, that Isaiah , the exaltation of his dear Son to his own right hand as the promised reward of his sufferings and death, and the glorious result of his resurrection and ascension up to the courts of bliss.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Isaiah 46:10". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/isaiah-46.html.

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