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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 50:8

 

 

He who vindicates Me is near; Who will contend with Me? Let us stand up to each other; Who has a case against Me? Let him draw near to Me.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Who will contend with me - The Bodleian MS. and another add the word הוא hu ; יריב הוא מי mi hu yarib, as in the like phrase in the next verse; and in the very same phrase Job 13:19, and so likewise in many other places, Job 17:3; Job 41:1. Sometimes on the like occasions it is זה מי mi zeh, and זה הוא מי mi hu zeh, "Who is this one?" The word has probably been lost out of the present text; and the reading of the MSS. above mentioned seems to be genuine.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-50.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He is near that justifieth me - That is, God, who will vindicate my character, and who approves what I do, does not leave nor forsake me, and I can with confidence commit myself and my cause to him (see the note at Isaiah 49:4). The word justify here is not used in the sense in which it is often in the Scriptures, to denote the act by which a sinner is justified before God, but in the proper, judicial sense, that he would declare him to be righteous; he would vindicate his character, and show him to be innocent. This was done by all the testimonies of God in his favor - by the voice which spake from heaven at his baptism - by the miracles which he performed, showing that he was commissioned and approved by God - by the fact that even Pilate was constrained to declare him innocent - by the wonders that attended his crucifixion, showing that ‹he was a righteous man,‘ even in the view of the Roman centurion Luke 23:47, and by the fact that he was raised from the dead, and was taken to heaven, and placed at the right hand of the Father - thus showing that his whole work was approved by God, and furnishing the most ample vindication of his character from all the accusations of his foes.

Who will contend with me? - This question indicates confidence in God, and in the integrity of his own character. The language is taken from transactions in the courts of justice; and it is a solemn call, on any who would dare to oppose him, to enter into a trial, and allege the accusations against him before the tribunal of a holy God.

Let us stand together - Before the seat of judgment as in a court (compare the note at Isaiah 41:1).

Who is mine adversary? - Margin, ‹Who is the master of my cause?‘ The Hebrew is ‹Lord (בעל ba‛al ) of judgment.‘ The expression means not merely one who has a lawsuit, or a cause, but one who is ‹lord of the judgment,‘ i. e, possessor of the cause, or one who has a claim, and can demand that the judgment should be in his favor. And the call here is on any who should have such a claim to prefer against the Messiah; who should have any real ground of accusation against him; that is, it is an assertion of innocence.

Let him come near to me - Let him come and make his charges, and enter on the trial.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-50.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"He is near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? let us stand up together: who is mine adversary? let him come near to me."

The one who was near to Jesus and who would surely justify him was God the Father. He justified Jesus when he raised him from the dead. "By the resurrection, God acquitted Christ of the charge of blasphemy upon which he had been condemned, and by that resurrection proclaimed him to be, `holy, harmless, undefiled and separate from sinners.'"[13] (See Hebrews 7:26).


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/isaiah-50.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He is near that justifieth me,.... His Father was "near" him in his whole state of humiliation; he left him not alone; he was at his right hand, and therefore he was not moved; and "justified" him from all the calumnies of his enemies, or the false charges they brought against him, and from all the sins of his people that were upon him; these he took upon him, and bore them, and made satisfaction for them, upon which he was acquitted; and which is evident by his resurrection from the dead, by his ascension to heaven, and session at the right hand of God; and by the gifts of the Spirit, extraordinary and ordinary, he received for men, and gave unto them; see 1 Timothy 3:16.

Who will contend with me? being thus acquitted; will the law and justice of God litigate the point with him? they are both satisfied; will Satan dispute the matter with him? he is foiled, conquered, and destroyed; or will the wicked Jews enter the argument with him? wrath is come upon them to the uttermost.

Let us stand together; face to face, if they dare; let them face me, if they can:

who is mine adversary? let him appear, that he may be known:

let him come near to me: and engage with me, if he has courage or skill. This is bidding defiance to all his enemies, and triumphing over them.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-50.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

(Isaiah 49:4). The believer, by virtue of his oneness with Christ, uses the same language (Psalm 138:8; Romans 8:32-34). But “justify” in His case, is God‘s judicial acceptance and vindication of Him on the ground of His own righteousness (Luke 23:44-47; Romans 1:4; 1 Timothy 3:16, with which compare 1 Peter 3:18); in their case, on the ground of His righteousness and meritorious death imputed to them (Romans 5:19).

stand together — in judgment, to try the issue.

adversary — literally, “master of my cause,” that is, who has real ground of accusation against me, so that he can demand judgment to be given in his favor (compare Zechariah 3:1, etc. Revelation 12:10).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-50.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He is near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? let us stand together: who is mine adversary? let him come near to me.

Justifieth — God will clear up my righteousness, and shew by many and mighty signs and wonders, that I lived and died his faithful servant.

Let him come — l am conscious of mine own innocency, and I know that God will give sentence for me.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-50.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8.He is near that justifieth me. We ought always to keep in remembrance that the Prophet mentions nothing that is peculiar to himself, but testifies what the Lord chooses to be, and will always be, towards faithful ministers, that whosoever has this testimony, that God has sent him, and knows that he discharges his office faithfully, may boldly despise all adversaries, and may not be moved by their reproaches, for he is “justified” by the Lord; and, in like manner, the Lord always is, and will be, near to defend and maintain his truth. Besides, that any one may be able to make this protestation, it is necessary that his conscience be pure; for, if any man thrust himself rashly into the office, and have no testimony of his calling, or bring forward his dreams publicly, in vain will he boast of this promise, which belongs only to those who have been called by God, and who sincerely and uprightly perform their duty. Now, although either hypocrites or despisers never cease to annoy the servants of God, yet Isaiah advances to meet them, as if none would venture to pick a quarrel or utter a slander; not that he can keep them in check, (19) but because they will gain nothing by all their attempts. He therefore declares, that he looks down with utter contempt on the false accusations which the enemies of sound doctrine pour out against its teachers. There is no crime with which they do not upbraid them; but their efforts are fruitless; for the Judge, by whom their integrity is maintained, is not far off. They may, therefore, as Paul did, boldly appeal from the wicked and unjust judgments of men to “the day of the Lord,” by whom their innocence will be made manifest. (1 Corinthians 4:4.)

Let us stand together. Godly teachers ought to have so great confidence as not to hesitate to give a bold defiance to adversaries. Satan, with his agents, does not always venture to attack openly, especially when he fights by falsehoods, but by ambuscade, and by burrowing under ground, endeavors to take them by surprise; but the servants of God are not afraid to “stand up” openly, and enter into contest with the enemy, and contend by arguments, provided that adversaries are willing to enter into the lists. So great is the force of truth that it does not dread the light of day, as we say that Isaiah here attacks boldly those whom he perceives to be plotting against him; and therefore he repeats, —

Let him draw near to me. Godly ministers ought to be ready to assign a reason for their doctrine. But where is the man that is willing to hear them patiently, and to consider what is the nature of that doctrine which they publicly declare? True indeed, adversaries will approach, but it is to draw their swords to slay them; to sharpen their tongues, that by every kind of slander they may tear them in pieces. In short, their whole defense consists in arms or deceitful stratagems; for they do not venture to contend by scriptural arguments. Relying, therefore, on the justice of our cause, we may freely defy them to the conflict. Though they condemn us without listening to our vindication, and though they have many that support the sentence which they have pronounced, we have no reason to be afraid; for God, whose cause we plead, is our Judge, and will at length acquit us.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-50.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 50:8 [He is] near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? let us stand together: who [is] mine adversary? let him come near to me.

Ver. 8. He is near that justifieth me,] i.e., God the Father will shortly clear up mine innocence, and declare me to be the son of God (my only crime now), "with power by the resurrection from the dead." [Romans 1:4]

Who will contend with me?] So John 8:46, Romans 8:33-34, where the apostle Paul, as a stout soldier and imitator of Christ, the "Captain of his salvation," useth the same argument, and teacheth us to do likewise.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-50.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Isaiah 50:8. Who is mine adversary? Who will hold suit against me?


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/isaiah-50.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He is near; God, though he seem to be at a distance, and to hide his face from me, yet he is in truth at my right hand, and ready to help me.

That justifieth me; that will publicly acquit me from all the calumnies of mine adversaries, who say that I am a transgressor of the law, a false teacher and deceiver, a blasphemer, and a devil, and the like, in which opinion they are confirmed by my death and sufferings. But God will clear up my righteousness, and show by many and mighty signs and wonders that he is well pleased with me, and that I lived and died his faithful servant.

Let him come near to me; I challenge all my accusers to stand and appear before the Judge face to face, and to produce all their charges against me; for I am conscious of mine own innocency, and I know that God will give sentence for me.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-50.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

who. ? Figure of speech Erotesis.

who is Mine adversary? = who can convict Me? Literally who owneth My sentence?


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-50.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He is near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? let us stand together: who is mine adversary? let him come near to me.

He is near that justifieth me - (Isaiah 49:4) The believer, by virtue of his oneness with Christ, uses the same language (Psalms 138:8; Romans 8:32-34). But 'justify,' in His case, is God's judicial acceptance and vindication of Him on the ground of own righteousness (Luke 22:44-47); Romans 1:4; 1 Timothy 3:16, with which cf. 1 Peter 3:18); in their case, on the ground of His righteousness and meritorious death imputed to them (Romans 5:19).

Let us stand together - in judgment, to try the issue.

Adversary ( ba`al (Hebrew #1167) mishpaaTiy (Hebrew #4941)) - literally, master of my cause; i:e., who has real ground of accusation against me, so that he can demand judgment to be given in his favour (cf. Zechariah 3:1, etc; Revelation 12:10).


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-50.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) He is near that justifieth—i.e., declares innocent and righteous. Appealing from the unrighteous judges of the earth, the Servant commits himself to Him who judges righteously (Luke 23:46). With that Judge to declare his innocence, what does he care for the accuser? (Comp. Romans 8:33-34.)

Who is mine adversary?—Literally, the master of a law-suit, i.e., the prosecutor.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-50.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He is near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? let us stand together: who is mine adversary? let him come near to me.
near that
Romans 8:32-34; 1 Timothy 3:16
let us
41:1,21; Exodus 22:9; Deuteronomy 19:17; Job 23:3-7; Matthew 5:25
mine adversary
Heb. the master of my cause.
Zechariah 3:1-10; Revelation 12:10

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-50.html.

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