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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 50:9

 

 

Behold, the Lord GOD helps Me; Who is he who condemns Me? Behold, they will all wear out like a garment; The moth will eat them.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The Lord God will help me - (See Isaiah 50:7). In the Hebrew this is, ‹The Lord Jehovah,‘ as it is in Isaiah 50:7 also, and these are among the places where our translators have improperly rendered the word יהוה yehovâh (Jehovah) by the word ‹God.‘

Who is he that shall condemn me? - If Yahweh is my advocate and friend, my cause must be right. Similar language is used by the apostle Paul: ‹If God be for us, who can be against us?‘ Romans 8:31; and in Psalm 118:6:

Jehovah is on my side; I will not fear:

What can man do unto me?

They all shall wax old - All my enemies shall pass away, as a garment is worn out and cast aside. The idea is, that the Messiah would survive all their attacks; his cause, his truth and his reputation would live, while all the power, the influence, the reputation of his adversaries, would vanish as a garment that is worn out and then thrown away. The same image respecting his enemies is used again in Isaiah 51:8.

The moth shall eat them up - The moth is a well known insect attached particularly to woolen clothes, and which soon consumes them (see the note at Job 4:19). In eastern countries, where wealth consisted much in changes of raiment, the depredations of the moth would be particularly to be feared, and hence, it is frequently referred to in the Bible. The sense here is, that the adversaries of the Messiah would be wholly destroyed.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-50.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Behold, the Lord Jehovah will help me; who is he that shall condemn me? behold, they all shall wax old as a garment; the moth shall eat them up."

These words are strongly suggestive of Paul's words in Romans 8:31, "If God be for us, who can be against us!"

"They all shall wax old as a garment ..." This is also declared to be true of the heavens themselves (Hebrews 1:10-12). If Christ shall indeed survive to see the end of the sidereal universe, infinitely less would be the chances that any of his earthly foes could outlast the Lord!

"The idea here is that Messiah would survive all their attacks; his cause, his truth, and his reputation would live, while all the power, influence and reputation of his adversaries would vanish just like a garment that is worn out and thrown away."[14]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/isaiah-50.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Behold, the Lord God will help me,.... This is repeated from Isa 50:7; see Gill on Isaiah 50:7; to show the certainty of it, the strength of his faith in it, and to discourage his enemies:

who is he that shall condemn me? make me out a wicked personF3מי הוא ירשיעני "quis ipse impium faciet me", Pagninus, Montanus; "impium vel praevaricatorem et iniquum faciet me", Vatablus. , prove me guilty, and pass sentence upon me, when thus acquitted and justified by the Lord God? The Apostle Paul seems to have some reference to this passage in Romans 8:33,

lo, they all shall waste old as doth a garment; his enemies, those that accused him, the Scribes, Pharisees, and chief priests; and those that condemned him, the Jewish sanhedrim, and the Roman governor:

the moth shall eat them up; they shall be like a worn out or motheaten garment, that can never be used more. The phrases denote how secret, insensible, and irrecoverable, their ruin should be, both in their civil and church state, all being abolished and done away.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-50.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

(Compare “deal,” or “proper,” Isaiah 52:13, Margin; Isaiah 53:10; Psalm 118:6; Jeremiah 23:5).

as a garment — (Isaiah 51:6, Isaiah 51:8; Psalm 102:26). A leading constituent of wealth in the East is change of raiment, which is always liable to the inroads of the moth; hence the frequency of the image in Scripture.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-50.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Behold, the Lord GOD will help me; who is he that shall condemn me? lo, they all shall wax old as a garment; the moth shall eat them up.

They β€” Mine accusers and enemies.

The moth β€” Shall be cut off and consumed by a secret curse.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-50.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

9.Who is he that condemmeth me? Paul appears to allude to this passage, in his Epistle to the Romans, when he says, “It is God that justifieth; who shall condemn?” (Romans 8:33.) We may safely have recourse to the judgment-seat of God, when we are well assured that we have obtained his righteousness by free grace through Christ. But here Isaiah handles a different subject; for he does not speak of the universal salvation of men, but of the ministry of the Word, which the Lord will defend against the attacks of wicked men, and will not suffer his people to be overwhelmed by their fraud or violence.

Lo, they shall all wax old as a garment. He now shews more clearly that it is not in the shade or at case that he boasts of his courage, as if none were giving him any disturbance; but he declares that, though he is assailed by deadly foes, still he boldly maintains his position; because all who fight with the Word of God shall fall and vanish away through their own frailty. In order to place the matter before their own eyes, he employs a demonstrative particle, “Behold, like garments shall they perish, being consumed by worms.” The Psalmist makes use of the same metaphor, when he compares the men of this world to the children of God. (Psalms 49:14.) The former, though they make a show and shine like dazzling garments, shall perish; but believers, who now are covered with filth, shall at length obtain new brightness and shine brilliantly like the stars. Here he speaks literally of fierce dogs that attack and bark at godly teachers. Though such persons are held in high estimation by men, and possess very high authority among them, yet their lustre shall perish and fade away, like that of garments which are eaten by worms.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-50.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 50:9 Behold, the Lord GOD will help me; who [is] he [that] shall condemn me? lo, they all shall wax old as a garment; the moth shall eat them up.

Ver. 9. Behold, the Lord God will help me.] See Isaiah 50:7.

Who is he that shall condemn me.] (a) If Libanius could say of his friend Basil (though of a different religion), Let but him praise me, and I care not who dispraiseth me; how much better might Christ, and may every good Christian say the same of God!

Lo, they shall all wax old as a garment.] The scribes and Pharisees (those old cankered carles) shall; for of them Jerome, Cyril, and others understand it. The Romans - according as they feared, and therefore crucified Christ [John 11:48] - came upon them, and took away both them and their nation.

The moth shall eat them up,] i.e., They shall be irrecoverably ruined, being once laid aside by God as an old wornout garment, which is made thereby food for moths. Thus it befell Pilate (saith Lyra here), banished by Tiberius; and thus it befell the priests, who were burned by Titus in the temple; who also added that it was fit that those which served in the temple should perish together with it.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-50.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Isaiah 50:9. Lo, they all shall wax old as a garment The simple sense of this metaphorical expression is, that all the adversaries of Christ should be abolished and done away, like a garment, which grows vile and useless by wearing, and is at length consumed by the moths. This is expressed plainly and literally, chap. Isaiah 41:11. See also Psalms 73:27. Some think that here is an allusion to the old oeconomy, which, under the dispensation of the new, was entirely to grow old and vanish away. See Psalms 102:26-27 compared with Hebrews 1:10-12.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/isaiah-50.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

That shall condemn me; that dare attempt it, or can justly do it.

They all, mine accusers and enemies,

shall wax old as a garment; the moth shall eat them up: shall pine away in their iniquity, as God threatened, Leviticus 26:39; shall be cut off and consumed by a secret curse and judgment of God, which is compared to a

moth, Hosea 5:12, whilst I shall survive and flourish, and the pleasure of God shall prosper in my hands, as is said, Isaiah 53:10.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-50.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

condemn Me = prove Me lawless.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-50.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Behold, the Lord GOD will help me; who is he that shall condemn me? lo, they all shall wax old as a garment; the moth shall eat them up.

Behold, the Lord God will help me - cf. Isaiah 52:13, margin; Isaiah 53:10; Psalms 118:6; Jeremiah 23:5).

Who (is) he (that) shall condemn me? - (Romans 8:34.)

They all shall wax old as a garment - (Isaiah 51:6; Isaiah 51:8; Psalms 102:26.) A leading constituent of wealth in the East in change of clothing, which is always liable to the inroads of the moth: hence, the frequency of the image in Scripture.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-50.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) They all shall wax old as a garment.β€”An echo of Job 13:28; Psalms 102:26; reproduced in Isaiah 51:6.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-50.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, the Lord GOD will help me; who is he that shall condemn me? lo, they all shall wax old as a garment; the moth shall eat them up.
they all
51:6-8; Job 13:28; Psalms 39:11; 102:26; Hebrews 1:11,12

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 50:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-50.html.

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