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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 60:10

 

 

"Foreigners will build up your walls, And their kings will minister to you; For in My wrath I struck you, And in My favor I have had compassion on you.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And the sons of strangers - They who have been devoted to a foreign and a false religion shall become devoted to the true religion, and engage in the service of the true God.

Shall build up thy walls - Jerusalem is represented as a ruined city. Her walls had been thrown down, and were lying prostrate. In restoring her to her former magnificence, strangers and foreigners would lend their cheerful aid. The idea is, that they would become tributary to the church, and esteem it a privilege to be engaged in any service, however laborious, that would promote its best interests.

And their kings - (See the notes at Isaiah 49:23).

For in my wrath I smote thee - Referring to the calamities which he had, from time to time, brought on Jerusalem (see Isaiah 57:17).

But in my favor - (See the notes at Isaiah 54:8).


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-60.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"And foreigners shall build up thy walls, and their kings shall minister unto thee: for in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favor have I had mercy on thee. Thy gates also shall be open continually; they shall not be shut day nor night; that men may bring unto thee the wealth of the nations, and their kings led captive. For that nation and kingdom that will not serve thee shall perish; yea, those nations shall be utterly wasted. The glory of Lebanon shall come unto thee, the fir tree, the pine, and the box-tree together, to beautify the place of my sanctuary; and I will make the place of my feet glorious. And the sons of them that afflicted thee shall come bending unto thee; and all they that despised thee shall bow themselves down at the soles of thy feet; and they shall call thee The City of Jehovah, The Zion of the Holy One of Israel."

This paragraph speaks of the contrast between the punishment and desolation brought upon the Old Israel because of their wickedness, and the glorious prosperity and blessing to be inherited by the New Israel, contingent in the case of the New Israel as it was in the case of the Old upon their continuity in the way of righteousness; and, without any doubt, many of the blessings to be associated with the New Covenant have not yet been realized fully because of the constant tendency of the human race to sin and rebellion against God.

Just as God's promise to Abraham of a posterity that would be as numberless as the stars of heaven was never fully realized because of the sins of the people, there must, in like manner, be many blessings of the Messianic Age that will fall short of God's intentions because of man's wickedness.

The building of walls and gates here could not possibly be construed as literal, because with gates that never closed night or day, walls would be useless. What is meant is that in the Lord's Kingdom of Messiah, "God openeth and no man shutteth, and shutteth and none openeth" (Revelation 3:7).

People represented here as bowing down to the soles of the feet of the Old Israel is fulfilled in the person of the Ideal Israel, who is Jesus Christ. Since Christ is the New Israel, all of his followers being "in him" and part of him, all who worship Christ are, in that act, bowing down to Israel, not to the old wicked Israel, of course, but to Christ the True Israel. The Biblical confirmation of this principle is seen in Revelation 3:9.

People who try to find the rebuilding of the walls and gates of literal Jerusalem here should note that, "Nehemiah commanded, "Let not the gates of Jerusalem be opened until the sun be hot; and while they stand on guard, let them shut the doors, and bar ye them" (Nehemiah 7:3). The gates mentioned here were never shut, either day or night.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/isaiah-60.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the sons of strangers shall build up thy walls,.... The sons of the people; or Gentiles, as the Targum; who were strangers from the covenants of promise, and aliens from the commonwealth of Israel; strangers to God and Christ, and the Spirit of Christ, and to the Gospel, and all that is good; yet the sons of these, being in great numbers converted everywhere, will be useful in building up the church of God, in strengthening, protecting, and defending it; these are the same with those afar off, that shall come and build in the temple of the Lord, Zechariah 6:15, such there have been among the Gentiles in all ages, more or less, since the times of the apostles, who have been instruments of the edification of the church, and of the defence of its doctrines and ordinances; and more there will be in the latter day:

and their kings shall minister unto thee; that is, the kings of the Gentiles, as Constantine, and some other truly Christian kings and emperors, have done, though their numbers have been very small as yet; but, when this prophecy is fulfilled, it will be a general case; kings everywhere will be nursing fathers, and queens nursing mothers to the church, will serve the interest of it, and promote it to the uttermost of their power; see Isaiah 49:23,

for in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee; for the Jews' rejection of the Messiah, for their contempt of his Gospel, and persecution of his apostles and ministers, wrath came upon them to the uttermost, upon their city, temple, and nation, to the destruction of them, and which is still upon them; and though blindness is happened unto them, and they are shut up in unbelief, yet there is a time when the Lord will have mercy on them, call and convert them, and return their captivity; see Romans 11:25.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-60.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And the sons of foreigners shall build up thy walls, and their l kings shall minister to thee: for in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee.

(l) Meaning Cyrus and his successors, but chiefly this is accomplished in them that serve Christ, being converted by his gospel.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-60.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

minister unto thee — (See on Isaiah 60:7; Isaiah 49:23).

in my wrath I smote thee — (Isaiah 54:7, Isaiah 54:8; Isaiah 57:17).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-60.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the sons of strangers shall build up thy walls, and their kings shall minister unto thee: for in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee.

Minister — Shall administer all necessaries to thee.

I had mercy — As I afflicted thee in my anger, so out of my compassion I will abundantly bless thee.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-60.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.And the sons of the stranger shall build thy walls. He continues the same subject. As he formerly said that foreigners shall submit to his authority, in order to build the temple; so he now says that “the sons of the stranger” shall bestow their labor in building the walls. Various are the comparisons by which he promises the restoration of the Church. It is customary in Scripture, when the Church is spoken of, to exhibit sometimes the temple, and sometimes Jerusalem. He promises that foreigners and strangers shall assist in rearing this building, that the Jews may not be terrified by their poverty or their small number, and consequently lose heart; for they might be tempted to distrust during the captivity, so that, though they hoped to return to their native country, still they might think that this could not be accomplished by them.

Now, Cyrus accomplished it, when he supplied them with a large amount of gold and silver. But in him these things were merely shadowed out. They were actually fulfilled in Christ, to whose reign they must entirely relate; for, first, Christ employed a few apostles, (Matthew 10:1) who could not be sufficient for so great a work; but afterwards he raised up strangers, from among whom he chose pastors, and wished that their foreign princes should be nursing­fathers of the Church.

With aggravated wickedness do the Papists pervert and corrupt this passage, by torturing it to uphold the tyranny of the Pope, whom they wish to possess supreme power over kings and princes. They speak impudent falsehood when they say that he is Christ’s deputy; for Christ’s “kingdom” is not of this world. (John 18:36) The Pope rules barbarously and tyrannically, and claims the power of changing and disposing of kingdoms. But kings submit to Christ in such a manner that they do not cease to be kings, but exercise all their power for preserving the worship of God and administering righteous government.

Hence we see how much those persons are opposed to the kingdom of Christ who wish to snatch authority and power from kings, that they themselves may possess it. Hence also the Anabaptists may be refuted, who overturn political order so far as to imagine that kings cannot be Christians in any other way than by renouncing their own authority, since even in the royal rank God shows that he wishes to hold the highest place.

For in my wrath I smote thee. Lest any one should object that it would have been easier to preserve the Church uninjured than to raise her from hell, God anticipates the objection, and shows that the Jews were justly afflicted in this manner, because he had been exceedingly provoked by their offenses; but he gives them good ground of hope, because he does not choose to demand the punishment which they had deserved, but will be satisfied, provided that a temporary chastisement shall humble them.

In my kindness have I had compassion on thee. He reminds the Jews what is the cause of this change, that they may not judge of it according to their own apprehension. When kingdoms are changed, and frequently rise and fall, men think that these events happen by chance, and that it is the common lot of the world. The Jews might think the same thing, when, in consequence of the kingdom of the Babylonians having been overturned, they were restored to liberty. For this reason the Lord testifies that all these things are governed by his providence; that is, that they may not shut their eyes after the manner of heathens. It is as if he had said, “If thou inquire why thou hast endured so many afflictions, the reason is this, that I was angry with thee and punished thy transgressions. But if thou ask the cause of thy deliverance, my undeserved kindness, and not thy worthiness, or an accidental occurrence, was the cause.” Accordingly, calamities do not happen by chance, nor is God angry without cause; and he is not angry to such a degree as not to leave room for his compassion. (Habakkuk 3:2)


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-60.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 60:10 And the sons of strangers shall build up thy walls, and their kings shall minister unto thee: for in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee.

Ver. 10. And the sons of strangers shall build up thy walls.] By preaching and writing for the truth, as did many famous Greek and Latin doctors; and since them, not a few of all nations.

And their kings shall minister unto thee.] As did Cyrus and Darius; but especially Constantine the Great (who cared not what he bestowed upon the Church, and was therefore, in a jeer, by the heathens called Pupillus, as if he needed a guardian to order his expenses), Valentinian, Theodosius, Honorius, Justinian. Our Edward VI, (a) besides the much good he did at home, sent at one time five thousand pounds to relieve Protestants beyond seas. Queen Elizabeth sent both men and means in abundance to the relief of the French and Hollanders.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-60.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The sons of strangers, viz. such as were not Israelites; and he puts sons of strangers by a usual Hebraism for strangers, properly termed alienigenae: see Isaiah 56:3. This was literally fulfilled in repairing the walls of Jerusalem; he spake before of the temple, now of the city; and spiritually in the ministers of the gospel, who are the walls and bulwarks of the church by preaching and writing for her; and ecclesiastical history affords us many instances of kings and princes that were great benefactors to her, among whom Constantine did greatly excel, not caring what he bestowed on her, Valentinian and Theodosius, &c.

Shall minister; shall administer all necessaries to thee: as they had been demolished by the Babylonians, so they were repaired by the favour of Cyrus, Darius Hystaspes, Artsxerxes, &c., all strangers, Ezra 6:7, &c, or strangers becoming proselytes: see Isaiah 56:6.

In my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee; as I afflicted thee in my anger, so out of my compassions I will abundantly bless thee.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-60.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. Strangers — Foreigners of false religions converted to the true religion. In…

wrath I smote thee — This refers to the morale of wasted Jerusalem, and their captivity at Babylon.

Their kings — Perhaps including Cyrus, Darius, etc., of Persia; likewise the later Christian kings.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/isaiah-60.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Foreigners will rebuild Jerusalem (cf. Isaiah 56:3; Isaiah 56:6), having formerly torn it down, and will minister to Israel in many ways. Peace will have arrived (cf. Isaiah 60:17; Isaiah 57:19). Formerly God disciplined His people for their sins, but He will bless them because He provided forgiveness for them.

"Any fulfillment of this after the Exile was only partial. The Persians made possible the rebuilding of the walls but did not do it themselves ( Isaiah 60:10). Its true fulfillment lay beyond the OT era altogether." [Note: Grogan, p330.]


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/isaiah-60.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

To thee. The Persians monarchs (Calmet) were mostly favourable to the Jews. (Haydock) --- The Gentiles help to form the Church, which rejects no one, ver. 11.


Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-60.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the sons of strangers. Reference to Pentateuch (Exodus 12:43. Leviticus 22:25). These were expressly excluded.

strangers = foreigners.

in My wrath. Compare Isaiah 54:8. Zechariah 1:15.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-60.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the sons of strangers shall build up thy walls, and their kings shall minister unto thee: for in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee.

Kings shall minister unto thee - (Isaiah 60:7, above; note, Isaiah 49:23).

For in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee - (Isaiah 54:7-8; Isaiah 57:17.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-60.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) The sons of strangers shall build . . .—Either as willing proselytes or as being brought into subjection. (Comp. Zechariah 6:15.) To build the temples or palaces of conquerors was, as in the case of the Egyptian and Babylonian bondage, the almost inevitable lot of the conquered.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-60.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the sons of strangers shall build up thy walls, and their kings shall minister unto thee: for in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee.
the sons
61:5; 66:21; Zechariah 6:15
their kings
3; 49:23; Ezra 6:3-12; 7:12-28; Nehemiah 2:7-9; Revelation 21:24,26
in my wrath
12:1; 54:7,8; 57:17,18; Psalms 30:5

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-60.html.

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