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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 60:6

 

 

"A multitude of camels will cover you, The young camels of Midian and Ephah; All those from Sheba will come; They will bring gold and frankincense, And will bear good news of the praises of the LORD.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The praises of the Lord "And the praise of Jehovah" - Thirty-three MSS. and three editions have ותהלת uthehillath, in the singular number; and so read the ancient versions, and one of my own MSS.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-60.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The multitude of camels - Lowth renders this, ‹An inundation of camels.‘ The Hebrew word properly denotes an inundation or overflowing of waters, but it is not improperly applied to a numerous caravan or company of animals. The camel is a well-known useful animal that constitutes the principal beast of burden in Arabia, and that may, indeed, be said to constitute its wealth. It is frequently spoken of as ‹the ship of the desert.‘ The description here is strictly applicable to Arabia; and, undoubtedly, the prophet meant to say, that that country would be blessed with the true religion, and that her merchandise and wealth would become tributary to the church of God.

Shall cover thee - Shall come in such multitudes as to fill thee. and to be spread out all over thee. Thus we speak of a land being covered with flocks and herds.

The dromedaries - The dromedary is a species of camel that is found principally in Arabia, with one bunch or protuberance on its back, in distinction from the Bactrian camel, which has two bunches (Webster). ‹It is found,‘ says Dr. Shaw, ‹in Barbary, though much more rarely there than in the Levant. It is chiefly remarkable for its prodigious swiftness; the Arabs affirming that it will run over as much ground in one day as one of their best horses will perform in eight or ten. The Shiekh who conducted us to Mount Sinai rode upon a camel of this kind, and would frequently divert us with an instance of its great abilities. For he would depart from our caravan, reconnoitre another just in view, and return to us again in less than a quarter of an hour. It differeth from the common camel in being of a finer and rounder shape, and in having on its back a lesser bunch or protuberance.‘ (Shaw‘s Travels, p. 240.) Hence, in Jeremiah 2:23, the prophet speaks of the ‹swift dromedary.‘ The idea here is, that these fleet animals, so valuable to the inhabitants of Arabia, would come bringing their merchandise for the service of the church of God; that is, the wealth of Midian and Ephah would be devoted to him.

Midian - Midian was the fourth son of Abraham and Keturah Genesis 25:2, and was the father of the Midianites. The Midianites are frequently mentioned in the Scriptures (Genesis 37:28-36; Numbers 25:17; Numbers 31:2; Judges 6:7-16; Judges 7:23, Judges 7:25, et al.) As early as the time of Jacob they were employed in traffic, and were associated with the Ishmaelites in this business, for it was to a company of these people that Joseph was sold by his brethren Genesis 37:28. ‹The original and appropriate district of the Midianites seems to have been on the east side of the Elanitic branch of the Red Sea, where the Arabian geographers place the city of Madian. But they appear to have spread themselves northward, probably along the desert coast of Mount Seir, to the vicinity of the Moabites; and on the other side, also, they covered a territory extending to the neighborhood of Mount Sinai‘ (Robinson‘s Calmet). Generally, the names Midianites and Ishmaelites seem to have been nearly synonymous.

Ephah - Ephah was the oldest son of Midian Genesis 25:4, and dwelt in Arabia Petraea, and gave name to the city of Ephah, called here by the Septuagint, Γαιφά Gaipha (Goepha). This city, and the small extent of country around it, constituted a part of Midian on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea, to which the territories of Midian extended. It abounded in dromedaries and camels Judges 6:6.

All they from Sheba shall come - Sheba is celebrated in the Scriptures chiefly as the place from where the Queen of that country came to visit Solomon 1 Kings 10:1; 2 Chronicles 9:1. That it abounded in wealth, may be inferred from the train which accompanied her, and from the presents with which she came to Solomon. ‹And she came to Jerusalem with a very great train, with camels that bare spices, and much fine gold, and precious stones‘ 1 Kings 10:2. Whether it was the same country as Seba has been a matter of uncertainty (compare the notes at Isaiah 43:3). It is elsewhere Psalm 72:10 mentioned as a place from where presents should be brought to Solomon:

The kings of Tarshish and of the isles shall bring presents;

The kings of Sheba and Seha shall offer gifts.

It is usually mentioned as a place in which gold and incense abounded. ‹To him shall be given the gold of Sheba Psalm 72:15; ‹To what purpose cometh there to me incense from Sheba‘ Jeremiah 6:20; ‹The merchants of Sheba were thy merchants‘ Ezekiel 27:22. According to Bruce, it was situated in Abyssinia in Ethiopa, and this has been the common opinion. It was south of Egypt, and the contact between Sheba and Jerusalem was not difficult; and probably a constant traffic was maintained between the two countries. In the time of the Mamclukes, before the conquest of Egypt and Arabia by Selim, a caravan constantly set out from Abyssinia for Jerusalem (compare the notes at Isaiah 45:14).

They shall bring gold and incense - That this country abounded in incense, see the passages of Scripture referred to above. On the meaning of the wood ‹incense,‘ see the notes at Isaiah 1:13. The idea is, that they would bring the most valuable productions of their country and devote them to God - perhaps designed to show that the wealth of Africa should yet be consecrated to the cause of the true religion.

And they shall show forth - These distant lands shall join in the worship of Yahweh.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-60.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The multitudes of camels shall cover thee, the dromedaries of Midian and Ephah,.... That is, multitudes of people riding on these creatures from the parts mentioned, which, abounded with them, should come and cover or fill Jerusalem, and the places about it. Midian was a son of Abraham by Keturah, and a son of Midian, Genesis 25:4 these and their posterity inhabit Arabia; and so this is a prophecy of the conversion of the Arabians that dwell in Arabia Felix, Petraea, and Deserts; and so the Targum,

"a multitude of Arabians shall cover thee round about.'

A dromedary is a lesser camel, and swifter than the others; and both are very frequent in these countries, and used in travelling. StraboF25Geograph. l. 16. p. 528. Ed. Casaub. calls the Arabian Scenites feeders of camels.

All they from Sheba shall come: they shall bring gold and incense; Sheba was another of the posterity of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:3 and lived near the others; the queen of this country came to hear the wisdom of Solomon; but the people of it in the latter, day will come to a greater than he; even to Christ and to his church, and bring their gold and incense, as the wise men did to Christ, and shall honour the Lord with their substance; see Psalm 72:10,

and they shall show forth the praises of the Lord; who has called them by his grace out of Mahometan darkness, into the marvellous light of the Gospel. These were the things the Sabaeans abounded with. StraboF26Geograph. I. 16. p. 535. says, that frankincense, myrrh, and cinnamon, grew with them; and that they have such an abundance of spices, that they use the branches of cinnamon, cassia, and other things, for fuel; and that some of them are so rich through merchandise, that they have very sumptuous houses, and much furniture of gold and silver, as vessels, beds, tripods, cups with covers; and even that their gates, and walls, and roofs, are adorned with ivory, gold and silver, and precious stones. And so PlinyF1Nat. Hist. l. 6. c. 28. observes: that the Sabaeans are very rich in fruitful and odoriferous woods, and in mines of gold, and other things; see Ezekiel 27:22. Vitringa understands both these clauses of the camels bringing gold and incense, and praising the Lord in their way, or being the occasion of it.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-60.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The f multitude of camels shall cover thee, the dromedaries of Midian and Ephah; all they from Sheba shall come: they shall bring gold and incense; and they shall show forth the praises of the LORD.

(f) Meaning, that everyone will honour the Lord with that with which he is able: Signifying that it is no true serving of God unless we offer ourselves to serve his glory, and all that we have.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-60.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

camels — laden with merchandise; the camel is “the ship of the desert” (compare Isaiah 30:6).

cover thee — so many of them shall there be.

dromedaries — They have one hunch on the back, whereas the camel has two: distinguished for swiftness (Jeremiah 2:23).

Midian — east of the Elanitic branch of the Red Sea, and stretching northward along Mount Seir. Associated with the Ishmaelites in traffic (Genesis 37:25, Genesis 37:28).

Ephah — part of Midian, east of the Dead Sea. It abounded in camels (Judges 6:5).

Sheba — in Arabia-Felix, famed for frankincense and gold (Psalm 72:15; Jeremiah 6:20), which they traded in (Isaiah 45:14; Job 6:19; Ezekiel 27:22).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-60.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The multitude of camels shall cover thee, the dromedaries of Midian and Ephah; all they from Sheba shall come: they shall bring gold and incense; and they shall shew forth the praises of the LORD.

The multitude — The treasure, that is brought upon camels. By these, and such like figurative expressions in several verses of this chapter is implied the coming in of all nations to Christ, and therefore they are brought in as presenting the chief commodities of their respective countries.

Dromedaries — A smaller sort of camel.

Ephah — The Midianites, and Ephahites dwelt beyond Arabia.

Sheba — A country in Arabia Felix, whose queen it was, that came to visit Solomon, and her bringing gifts might be a type of this, Solomon being a type of Christ.

Gold — The principal commodities with which this country abounded, by which we are to understand whatever is precious.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-60.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

6.A multitude of camels shall cover thee. The Prophet describes figuratively the glory of the Church, and accommodates his discourse to the time, and to the persons with whom he had to do. We must keep in remembrance what we have often said, that the prophets took into account the people whom they taught, and therefore mentioned customary transactions and well­known ceremonies, that, under the figures of them, they might describe the spiritual worship of God. The Jews must be first instructed, and afterwards the Gentiles, to whom the truth of those things has come; as if he had said, that nations far distant shall come, with their wealth, into the power of God; for, when he foretells that the Church shall be enriched, this must not be understood as referring to the persons of men; but, on account of the unity of the Head and the members, what belongs to God and to Christ is transferred to the Church. Foolishly, therefore, do the Jews, under the pretense of this prophecy, devour with their insatiable avarice all the riches of the earth; and not less absurdly do the Papists torture these words to support their luxuries, wealth, and magnificence.

He mentions “camels, frankincense, gold., and sheep,” because he has in his eye what each country produces, in order to show that all will consecrate to God whatever they shall have in their power, and will offer themselves and all that they have as a sacrifice. Hence it ought to be inferred, that we cannot be truly converted to the Lord, without offering to him all our faculties; for these are “spiritual sacrifices,” (1 Peter 2:5) which he demands, and which cannot be refused to him, if our hearts be dedicated and consecrated to him in sincerity. (Romans 12:1) Wicked men abuse the gifts of God for luxury and intemperance, and corrupt them, as far as lies in their power, by unworthy profanation; but good men, by using them with a pure conscience, dedicate them to the Lord. No one, therefore, can belong to God without dedicating and devoting to him all that he has.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-60.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 60:6 The multitude of camels shall cover thee, the dromedaries of Midian and Ephah; all they from Sheba shall come: they shall bring gold and incense; and they shall shew forth the praises of the LORD.

Ver. 6. The multitude of camels shall cover thee,] i.e., Of such peoples as usually ride upon camels, viz., the Arabians and the adjacent countries; these shall come flocking and flowing to the Church with their precious and pleasant riches.

The dromedaries.] A lesser and lower kind of camels, commended for their swiftness. [Jeremiah 2:23] We call slow people dromedaries by antiphrasis, and for this, that they can travel four days together without water. Bajazet, beaten by Tamerlane, fled for his life, and might have escaped, had he not stayed to water his mare by the way, which thereupon went the more slowly, and was overtaken by the Tartars.

They shall bring gold and incense.] This the ancients interpret as those wise men from the east, [Matthew 2:11] which was indeed a small essay of this prophecy. But why should the Papists call them the three kings of Cullen?

And they shall shew forth the praises of the Lord.] This is more than all their rich gifts. A thankful (a) man is worth his weight in the gold of Ophir.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-60.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The multitude of camels, i.e. the abundance of wealth and treasure that is brought upon camels; this being the creature the Eastern people used for carriage of their gold and spice, and other rich treasure, which are said to cover them; the like phrase with that Jude 6:5: or whereby is understood those people that did use to ride on camels, as the Arabians and the bordering countries; for by these and such-like figurative and borrowed expressions in several verses, of this chapter is particularized several nations, and by them is implied the coming in of all nations unto Christ; and therefore they are brought in as presenting the choicest commodities of their respective countries, so that we may be the better excused from speaking particularly to them in their respective places.

The dromedaries; or, also or even the dromedaries, which are a lesser sort of camel, so called from their swiftness in running, to which they are the better enabled, because, as Pliny observes, they can endure thirst four days together: q.d. They shall make all the haste imaginable in bringing their riches to thee. Of Midian and Ephah: both these Midianites and Ephaites descended from Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:2,4; they dwelt beyond Arabia; and camels are mentioned coming from hence, because of all places they were the most numerous here, Jude 7:12.

Sheba: this Sheba descended from Cush, the son of cursed Ham, the son of Noah, Genesis 10:6,7, from whom a certain country in Arabia Felix took its name, whose queen it was that came to visit Solomon 1 Kings 10:1; and her bringing gifts might be a type of this, Solomon being a type of Christ, of which the wise men might be the first-fruits, Mt 2.

Shall bring gold and incense; the principal commodities with which this country abounded, and by which we are to understand whatever is precious; and frankincense is only peculiar to Arabia.

They shall show forth the praises of the Lord; the motive drawing them thither being more for religion than trade.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-60.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Gentiles will also come from other parts of the world bringing treasure to honor Israel. The visit of the wise men at Jesus" birth suggests a fulfillment (cf. Matthew 2:11). The visit of the Magi should have alerted Israel to the identity of Jesus. But again, the visit of the Magi to Bethlehem was only a foretaste of what Isaiah predicted would come to all Israel. Isaiah saw camels as thick as flies on meat covering the land around Jerusalem. These Gentiles will express thanks that Israel has brought the Word of God to them, in its written, spoken, and incarnate forms.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/isaiah-60.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Epha. Abraham's grandson, who dwelt near his father, Madian, in Arabia, which was famous for camels. (Calmet) --- Saba. India mittit ebur, molles sua thura Sabæi? (Geor. i.) --- The Arabians embraced the gospel, but never brought their treasures to Jerusalem. (Calmet) --- The three kings came on swift beasts to adore Christ, and fulfilled his prophecy, Matthew ii. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-60.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

The multitude = A stream.

Sheba. Compare Psalms 72:10. Both descended from Abraham and Keturah.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-60.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The multitude of camels shall cover thee, the dromedaries of Midian and Ephah; all they from Sheba shall come: they shall bring gold and incense; and they shall shew forth the praises of the LORD.

The multitude of camels - laden with merchandise; the camel is 'the ship of the desert' (cf. Isaiah 30:6).

Shall cover thee - so many of them shall there be.

Dromedaries. They have one bunch on the back, whereas the camel has two: distinguished for swiftness (Jeremiah 2:23).

Of Midian - east of the Elanitic branch of the Red Sea, and stretching northward along mount Seir. Associated with the Ishmaelites in traffic (Genesis 37:25; Genesis 37:28).

And Ephah - part of Midian, east of the Dead Sea. Midian abounded in camels (Judges 6:5).

All they from Sheba - in Arabia Felix, famed for frankincense and gold (Psalms 72:15; Jeremiah 6:20), which they traded in (Isaiah 45:14; Job 6:19; Ezekiel 27:22).


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-60.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) The multitude of camels . . .—The verse paints the commerce of the East, as Isaiah 60:5 had described that of the West. For the camels and riches of Midian, see Judges 6:5; Judges 8:26. “Ephah” appears in Genesis 25:4 among the sons of Midian. “Sheba” keeps up its traditional fame for gold and incense (Psalms 72:10; Strabo xvi. 4, 19).


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-60.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The multitude of camels shall cover thee, the dromedaries of Midian and Ephah; all they from Sheba shall come: they shall bring gold and incense; and they shall shew forth the praises of the LORD.
multitude
30:6; Judges 6:5; 7:12; 1 Kings 10:2; 2 Kings 8:9
Midian
Genesis 25:4,13
all
45:14; Genesis 10:7; 25:3; 2 Chronicles 9:1; Psalms 72:10,15
bring
61:6; Malachi 1:11; Matthew 2:11
they shall shew
Romans 15:9; Philippians 2:17; 1 Peter 2:5,9; Revelation 5:9,10; 7:9-12

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-60.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

THE GLORY OF THE GOSPEL CHURCH

(Missionary Sermon.)

Isa . The multitude of camels shall cover thee, &c.

The primary reference is to the change in Jerusalem after the captivity. Instead of desolation there would be return of the life of a prosperous capital. The merchandise which had deserted it because there was no market would find its way back from all quarters. Arabia would again send its swift camels and dromedaries laden with spices and other products, &c. But glorious as this primary reference to material prosperity, it is surpassed by the secondary. Many of the terms can only be understood as contemplating the glory of the Gospel Church, which was to arise in consequence of the appearance of the Messiah and the accomplishment of His long-predicted work. View the text in this light, and observe some circumstances respecting the converts of the Gospel.

I. THEY SHALL BE DRAWN FROM AN EXTENDED AREA.

Keeping in view the wide geographical sweep of this chapter, it cannot be regarded as saying less than that the converts of the Gospel shall be derived from all the ends of the earth. Christianity is the true gospel of humanity.

1. It is needed by man universally.

2. It is adequate to man.

3. It is adapted to man.

4. It is intended for man.

II. THEY SHALL COME NUMEROUSL TO ITS ATTRACTION.

The prophet sees in vision these multitudes coming from various quarters. What is the centre to which they are attracted by an invisible but irresistible power? It is Christ (Joh ). Already, to a large extent, has this declaration been fulfilled. What multitudes have come to Him during many ages! In connection with the modern missionary enterprise, there is no quarter of the world from which representatives are not, in growing numbers, coming to the cross.

III. THEY SHALL BRING THEIR OF FERINGS TO His FEET.

They receive, indeed, a free salvation. But it is not intended to minister to their selfishness. It aims to destroy the old selfishness by the excitement of gratitude and love. Love wishes to requite the benefactor. Moreover, the experience of Christ's salvation, contact with His love, begets a corresponding benevolence, which looks forth to the needs of others. "They shall bring gold and incense." Each country and each man brings his own proper production and possession, and lays it at the feet of Him who emptied Himself of His riches for us. In the light of His redeeming love let each ask, "How much owest thou unto my Lord?"

IV. THEY SHALL CONTRIBUTE TO THE CELEBRATION OF HIS PRAISE.

Is not praise the expression of joyfulness? Is not joyfulness the experience of the Church when most fully consecrated to Christ? They shall show it—

1. By their songs. The first love of the Church expressed itself in songs of praise. So did the Reformation. So does every revival. Missionary converts speedily develop a love of sacred Song of Solomon 2. By their lives. The changed life of every convert that walks consistently with his new profession is a perpetual showing forth of God's praise. The worldling, the impure, the indifferent, the idolater changed.

3. By their testimony. In their turn testify for God and the Gospel. From personal experience speak confidently. Every separate convert a fresh seed of salvation.

By coming to Christ, consecration to Christ, living to His praise, will this be fulfilled.—J. Rawlinson.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Isaiah 60:6". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/isaiah-60.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

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