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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 10:23

 

 

I know, O LORD, that a man's way is not in himself, Nor is it in a man who walks to direct his steps.

Adam Clarke Commentary

O Lord, I know that the way of man is not in himself - I will not pretend to dispute with thee; thou dost every thing wisely and justly; we have sinned, and thou hast a right to punish; and to choose that sort of punishment thou thinkest will best answer the ends of justice. We cannot choose; thou hast appointed us to captivity; we must not repine: yet,


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-10.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"O Jehovah, I know that the way of man is not in himself; it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps. O Jehovah, correct me, but in measure; not in thine anger, lest thou bring me to nothing. Pour out thy wrath upon the nations that know thee not, and upon the families that call not on thy name; for they have devoured Jacob, yea they have devoured him and consumed him, and laid waste his habitation."

"It is not in man that walketh to direct his steps ..." (Jeremiah 10:23). This is one of the most profound statements in the Scriptures and one that needs continually to be heeded by sinful men. As long as men seek to be guided by their own counsels, and by what seems good to them, they are destined to frustration and defeat.

"O Jehovah, correct me, but in measure" (Jeremiah 10:24). Jeremiah's payer here recognized the need of Judah for correction, but he prays for God's mercy as the blow falls.

In the Jewish view, only the Gentiles deserved divine wrath and punishment. The Jews were God's chosen people. Thus there found a way into Jeremiah's prayer for a plea for God to pour out his wrath and indignation upon the Gentile instruments of Judah's chastisement. This prayer was just, "Because the heathen were devouring Jacob, not as obedient ministers of divine chastisement, but as wild beasts, gratifying their lusts, and their hatred of true religion."[26] In the eventual history of the Chosen People, Jeremiah's prayer was answered. In mercy, God concluded their captivity and made it possible for all who wished to do so to return to Judah; but Babylon was ruthlessly destroyed by the Medo-Persians.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/jeremiah-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

O Lord, I know that the way of man is not in himself,.... Kimchi and Ben Melech interpret it of that well known man Nebuchadnezzar, whose way was not in himself, and was not master of his own resolutions, but was under the influence and direction of divine Providence: when he set out of Babylon, he thought to have gone against the Ammonites; but when he came to a place where two ways met; the one leading to the children of Ammon, the other to Jerusalem; God changed his mind, and he steered his course to Jerusalem, to chastise Zedekiah for the breach of his oath: but the words seem to have a more general meaning; and the sense to be, that the prophet knew that it was not with him, nor with any of the godly, to escape the judgments that were coming upon them; that they were entirely in the hands of the Lord, to be guided, directed, and disposed of at his pleasure. The words may be accommodated to spiritual things and the affair of salvation; and be rendered thus, "I know, O Lord, that not for man is his way"F4ידעתי יהוה כי לא לאדם דרכו "novi, Jehovah, quod non sit homini via ejus", Schmidt; so Vatablus, Cocceius. ; his own way is not good for him; not his sinful way, for this is opposite to God's way, and a going out of it; it is not according to his word; it is after the course of the world; and it is a dark and crooked way, and leads to, and ends in, destruction and death, if grace prevent not: nor the way of his own righteousness; this is no way of access to God, no way of acceptance with him, no way of justification before him, no way of salvation, no way to heaven, and eternal happiness; that which is the good and right way, the only way of salvation, is not of man, in him, or with him naturally; it is not of his devising and contriving, and much less of his effecting; it is not even within his knowledge; and so far as he knows anything of it, he does not approve of it: but it is of God; the scheme of it is of his forming; it is a work wrought out by Christ; it is a way of salvation revealed in the Gospel; and the thing itself is savingly made known, and applied by the Spirit of God; all which is known and owned when men are spiritually enlightened:

it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps; as not in natural and civil things, much less in religious ones; a good man is one that "walks", which supposes life and strength, without which there can be no walking; and a progression, a going on in a way; which ways are Christ, and his ordinances the path of doctrine and of duty; yet it is not even in this good man "to direct" and order "his steps" of himself; it is the Lord that must do it, and does; he can take no step aright without him; he is guided by him and his Spirit, both in the path of truth and of obedience; and hence it is that the saints persevere unto the end; see Psalm 37:23.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-10.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

O LORD, I know that p the way of man [is] not in himself: [it is] not in man that walketh to direct his steps.

(p) He speaks this because Nebuchadnezzar purposed to have made war against the Moabites and Ammonites, but hearing of Zedekiah's rebellion he turned his power to go against Jerusalem, (Ezekiel 21:21) therefore the prophet says that this was the Lord's direction.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-10.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Despairing of influencing the people, he turns to God.

way of man not in himself — (Proverbs 16:1; Proverbs 20:24; James 4:13, James 4:14). I know, O Jehovah, that the march of the Babylonian conqueror against me (Jeremiah identifying himself with his people) is not at his own discretion, but is overruled by Thee (Isaiah 10:5-7; compare Jeremiah 10:19).

that walketh — when he walketh, that is, sets out in any undertaking.

direct … steps — to give a prosperous issue to (Psalm 73:23).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-10.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

O LORD, I know that the way of man is not in himself: it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.

It is not — Lord we know it is not in our power to divert these judgments that are coming upon us, but thou canst moderate, and limit them as thou pleasest.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-10.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The Jews confine this to Sennacherib, who had, according to his own will, at one time resolved to attack the Ammonites, at another the Moabites, and to reduce them under his own power; but had been induced by a sudden impulse to go to Judea. But this is frivolous. The Prophet, I doubt not, referred to the Jews, who had for a long time been accustomed to dismiss every fear, as though they were able by their own counsels to consult in the best way for the public good: for we know, that whenever any danger was apprehended from the Assyrians, they usually fled for aid to Egypt or to Chaldea. Thus, then, they provided for themselves, so tlmt they thought that they took good care of their affairs, while they had recourse to this or that expedient; and then, when the prophets denounced on them the vengeance of God, they usually regarded only their then present state, as though God could not; in one instant vibrate his lightnings from the rising to the setting sun.

Since then this security produced torpor and obstinacy, the Prophet in this passage justly exclaims, I know, Jehovah, that his way is not in man’s power; nor is it in the power of a person walking to direct his steps (22)

We now perceive what the Prophet had in view; and this is ever to be remembered — that if we desire to read what has been written with profit, we must consider the meaning intended by the Holy Spirit, and then the purpose for which he has spoken. When we understand these things, then it is easy to make the application to other things: but he who does not weigh the end in view, ever wanders here and there, and though he may say many things, he yet does not reach the chief point. (23) But we must observe that the Prophet, as he had done before, spoke as though he had God alone as his witness, for he saw that his own people were so hardened, that he addressed his words to them in vain: he therefore turned to God, which was a proof that he despaired as to the disposition of the people, as though he had said, “I shall have nothing to do with this perverse people any more; for I have already found out by my experience that their perverseness is untameable. I am now therefore constrained, O Lord, to address thee as though I were alone in the world.” This is the reason why he spoke to God himself. We shall defer the rest fill to-morrow.

I know, Jehovah, That not to a mortal is his way;
Nor
is it for man to walk And to stablish his steps.

Such substantially is the meaning of the Targum, and of all the versions, except the Syriac, which Blayney has followed thus:

I know Jehovah, that his way is not like that of men,
Nor like a human being doth he proceed and order his going.

This construction is wholly inadmissible. Had Jehovah been in the objective case, it would have את before it. See 1 Samuel 3:7. Then the rest of the verse is a paraphrase and not a version; and such a paraphrase as the original will not bear. To “walk” and to “stablish” are in the same predicament, both infinitives; and so they are rendered in all the versions and the Targum.

The design of the passage seems to be more correctly intimated by Gataker than by Calvin: — “Lord, we know well, that this army cannot come in but by thy permission; but since thou art resolved to chastise us, we beseech thee, in wrath remember mercy.” So in the next verse the Prophet says, “O Lord, correct me, but with judgment.” — Ed.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-10.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 10:23 O LORD, I know that the way of man [is] not in himself: [it is] not in man that walketh to direct his steps.

Ver. 23. O Lord, I know that the way of man is not in himself.] He is not master of his own way, but is directed and overruled by the powerful providence; even this cruel Chaldean also, that marcheth against us.

It is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.] We know not what to do, or which way to turn ourselves, only our eyes are toward thee. Behold, we submit to thy justice, and implore thy mercy. This text doth mainly make against freewill, saith Oecolampadius; and yet the Pelagians would hence gather that man can, by his own strength, walk in the way to heaven; but he must be helped, say they, by God’s grace, that he may be perfect.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 10:23. O Lord, I know, &c.— "Thou rulest, O Lord, all events; all that happens comes to pass through an effect of thy adorable providence. It is not in man to hinder that which hath been once absolutely resolved by thee: so that since, Lord, thou art pleased to make us feel the awful effects of thy justice, chastise us; but spare my weakness: Correct me, but with judgment, not in thine anger," Jeremiah 10:24. Again: "I know, O Lord, that man, left to himself, cannot lead himself into good by the power of nature: that all he has and all he does of good, he derives from thy mercy." Theodoret and others explain it thus: "We know, O Lord, that the prince whom thou sendest against us, comes not without thy orders; that the success of his arms, and the good fortune of his enterprize, proceed only from thee: but deliver us, O Lord, from this terrible enemy; and if we have merited chastisement, may we receive it at thine hand! Punish us as a father, and not as a judge." See Calmet.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, As they were shortly to be carried captives to Babylon, a place most remarkably given to idolatry, superstition, and judicial astrology, there was need to guard them against the temptations to which they would be there exposed.

1. They must not learn the ways of the heathen nations, nor follow their works. From the aspect of the heavens, from eclipses, and the conjunction of the planets, the astrologers pretended to foretel the fate of kingdoms, and the destiny of men; and their predictions, heard with superstitious awe, terrified the heathen: but they must shew no regard to these prognostications, much less pay divine honours to the sun, moon, and stars, as these men did. Nor must they join in their idolatry, and the vain customs or ceremonies of religion which they used. A senseless log is the object of their adoration, cut from the wood, and squared by the carpenter; and, however decked with gold and silver, and adorned with costliest robes of blue and purple, yet is it unable to stand without being nailed and fastened, or to move without being carried. It can neither hear the prayer of its votaries, nor speak a word in answer to their requests. Such a doctrine of vanities is the stock, a work of errors and falsehood; which must deceive and disappoint those who are so infatuated as to expect aught from it: unable alike to do good or evil, and therefore in no wise to be made the object either of fear or hope. Altogether brutish and foolish are the worshippers, and equally brutish the maker in his knowledge, who vainly conceits that the work of his hands can be possessed of divinity. Every founder is confounded, who, after all his pains to make his god, can receive no benefit from him: for how should they convey life, or any of the blessings of it, to others, which have no breath in them, inanimate in themselves? yea, so far from helping others, that they are unable to help themselves? and in the time of their visitation these gods, who have made neither the heaven nor the earth, shall perish, with their senseless devotees.

2. The prophet directs them to the only proper object of their worship, fear, and love; and that is, the glorious JEHOVAH, the only living and true God.

[1.] There is none like unto him] He is without a rival, and above all comparison: none can either bestow such mercies or inflict such miseries as he. O Lord, thou art great; transcendently great and glorious in his adorable perfections, and all his works of creation, providence, and grace; and thy name is great, exalted far above all blessing and praise. Who would not fear thee, O king of nations? whose kingdom ruleth over all, the work of whose hands the whole creation is, and therefore by right he should be universally feared and worshipped: for to thee doth it appertain, and to thee alone: to place that fear and offer that worship elsewhere, argues both deep impiety and senseless stupidity. For none in wisdom, none in power, among earth's mightiest sons, with him can be compared. Note; (1.) God's eternal power and godhead, by the works of creation, are so declared to all the world, as to leave idolaters without excuse. (2.) The more we contemplate the unsearchable greatness and glory of our God, the more shall we be filled with reverence and godly fear, and lost in wonder and adoration.

[2.] He is the only true God, and all pretenders to deity besides are false and counterfeit. He is the living God, or Gods, the Trinity in Unity, having life in and of himself, whilst all creatures receive theirs from him, and idols are dead and inanimate. He is an everlasting king, subsisting from all eternity, ruling over all, and of his dominion there is no end, while these are all the creatures of yesterday, and hourly running to decay. Note; If God be our king, it behoves us to see that we approve ourselves faithful subjects, dependent on his protection, devoted to his service.

[3.] He is the Creator, Governor, and Judge of all. He hath made the earth by his power, suspended in the vast expanse; and yet so firm, that it cannot be moved from the place where God hath appointed it to perform its revolutions; and in the beautiful disposition of all things in it his infinite wisdom as well as power appears; and hath stretched out the heavens by his discretion, as a canopy over us, decked with those bright luminaries which peculiarly display his glory. At his will, the whole machine is governed: he speaks; the heavens lower, the vapours rise, the lightnings flash, the thunders roll, the rain descends, the tempests roar, and all under his control. When he cometh forth in judgment, at his wrath the earth shall tremble, afraid to meet the judge upon his throne, and the nations shall not be able to abide his indignation; if his wrath be kindled, yea, but a little, it will burn to the nethermost hell. Most justly, therefore, doth he claim, and we are bound to pay, our worship, adoration, and service to him, and him alone.

[4.] He is the portion of Jacob, and therefore they are under peculiar obligations to adore and serve him. He has showered upon them his blessings on every side: he is the former of all things, and not like idol vanities; and Israel is the rod of his inheritance, separated for his peculiar service; the Lord of Hosts is his name, his distinguished title, forasmuch as he doeth whatsoever pleaseth him in the hosts of heaven, as well as among the inhabitants of the earth. Note; (1.) They who have God for their portion, cannot wish for more; for he is able to do for them exceeding abundantly above all they can ask or think. (2.) God's Israel—the church of the faithful—are his inheritance; for they who choose him for their God, he delights in as his people; and his love and favour are better than the life itself.

2nd, We have,

1. The threatened ruin of Judah and Jerusalem. To secure their goods from the Chaldean army, the Jews are here represented as gathering them together, and conveying them to the fortress of Zion; but they will find it no place of safety. As a stone out of a sling, so easily, so violently should they be cast out of their land and city, and sink into the depths of distress, that they may find it so, as the prophets have spoken, to whose word they refused to attend. Note; They who have mocked at hell and damnation, as bugbears designed to awe the minds of the superstitious, will, to their cost, find it so, that these are dreadful realities. 2. A mournful lamentation is made over their calamities: which some regard as the language of Zion bemoaning herself, but rather may be the words of the prophet affected at the view of their miseries, and sympathizing with them. Woe is me for my hurt, or my breach, when the walls of Jerusalem were battered down, the Chaldeans entered, and terribly massacred the inhabitants; but I said, Truly, this is a grief, and I must bear it; it was bitter indeed, but he desired to submit with patience: my tabernacle is spoiled, both the city and temple, and all my cords are broken, so that the ruin is irreparable. My children are gone forth of me into captivity, and none left to repair the desolation. And no wonder their affairs are so desperate, when the pastors are become brutish; the rulers in church and state, instead of attempting to prevent, hastened their ruin by their sin and folly; they have not sought the Lord in any of their distresses, but left him far above out of their sight, therefore they shall not prosper; no attempts to secure themselves shall succeed, and all their flocks shall be scattered; their enemies shall prevail, and that suddenly. Behold, the noise of the bruit is come, intelligence of the Chaldean army advancing; a great commotion out of the north country, from Babylon, to make the cities of Judah desolate, and a den of dragons, a righteous retaliation upon those who made them a den of thieves. Note; (1.) In our afflictions God permits us to complain, but he forbids us to murmur. (2.) When the pastors are brutish, no marvel that the people are blind. (3.) They who live without prayer, and seek not to God for counsel and help, must needs err from the right way, and perish in their sins.

3. Though the people have no ears to hear his preaching, God hath an ear to hear his prayer, and therefore to him the prophet looks up.

[1.] He acknowledges God's over-ruling providence and guidance in all the affairs of men. O Lord, I know that the way of man is not in himself: it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps: a superior power controls his thoughts and designs, and an unseen hand guides his steps, as was the case of Nebuchadnezzar in this invasion, and more generally may be applied to all mankind. Whatever schemes we form, the event is not in our own power: when we mean only to pursue our own purposes, God leads us insensibly to fulfil his designs; therefore, amidst all our contrivances, we must entirely refer ourselves to him for the success, conscious that we have no power of ourselves, without the divine grace and aid, to help ourselves. The Lord must dictate, guide, support, and prosper us, and then we shall walk aright.

[2.] In the name of the people, he intreats the removal or alleviation of their heavy judgments. O Lord, correct me, for that they must expect, and acknowledge it to be their just desert; but with judgment, in measure; not in thine anger, as the wrath of an enemy, but in love, as the chastisement of a father, lest thou bring me to nothing; for if his wrath be kindled, yea, but a little, who can abide it? Note; (1.) Correction from God is kindness; and his rod, however grievous for the time to the flesh, we must not wish to have removed till it has done its work. (2.) God's afflictions on his people are designed not to bring them to nothing, but to bring them to himself and to glory.

[3.] He beseeches God to remember their oppressors, and to recompence them according to the work of their hands. Pour out thy fury upon the heathen that know thee not; true believers are corrected in mercy; but God's enemies are to be destroyed in wrath; and upon the families that call not on thy name, the nations of the ungodly, who neither know nor worship the true God; for they have eaten up Jacob, and devoured him, and consumed him, and have made his habitation desolate; which, though God hath permitted as their just punishment, does not at all lessen the guilt and malice of their enemies who persecute them maliciously. Note; (1.) Families who live without prayer are to be accounted heathens. (2.) Ignorance of God is the inlet to all sin. (3.) When God hath corrected his people, he often turns the rod, and leaves on the instruments that he employs the severest marks of his indignation.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-10.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The prophet finding that all he could say prevailed nothing upon this people, but they rather grew worse, he turns himself to God. How far these words concern Pelagianism, or free-will, either one way or other, or whether at all, concerns not this comment; they seem literally to be the words of the prophet, relating either to himself and other holy men: q.d. It is not in our power, neither do we presume, to stop this decree of thine against Judea: or else to the enemies in general, or Nebuchadnezzar in particular: q.d. We know all their marches and designs are of thine appointing, and all their achievements of thine ordering, it is thy providence that directs every step they take against this land, without whom no counsels shall prosper, who alone turnest men’s hearts which way thou pleasest, Proverbs 21:1, who canst bring men on, or turn them back, as thou seest good, Isaiah 37:29, so that no man’s way is properly his own, to give them what success he will: or to the people, whereby he doth tacitly insinuate that all the counsels and measures they think to take, whether by their own strength at home, or confederacies and alliances abroad, will avail nothing; however they may think to escape by some devices or stratagems of their own, it is to no purpose, God can overturn all in a moment, when men think their counsels are ripe, and they want nothing but execution: or lastly, as others think, this is by way of petition: q.d. Lord, we know it is not in our power to divert these judgments that are coming upon us by the Chaldeans, but thou canst moderate and limit them as thou pleasest; seeing all their designs are ordered by thy providence, they cannot do any thing against us without thy permission: this the next verse seems to favour.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-10.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The prophet confessed that people do not have the wisdom to direct their own steps in safe and successful paths (cf. Psalm 37:23; Proverbs 3:5-6; Proverbs 16:9; Proverbs 20:24).


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-10.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Jeremiah 10:23. O Lord, I know, &c. — The prophet now turns to God, and addresses himself to him, finding it to little purpose to speak to the people. It is some comfort to poor ministers, that, if men will not hear them, God will; and to him they have liberty of access at all times. Let them close their preaching with prayer, as the prophet here does, and then they will have no reason to complain that they have laboured in vain. That the way of man is not in himself — The prophet must here be considered as acknowledging the superintendence and dominion of the divine providence; that by it, and not by their own will and wisdom, the affairs both of nations and particular persons are directed and governed. His words in this verse, taken in connection with the following, may be thus paraphrased: Thy providence, O Lord, superintends all events; all that happens comes to pass through thy permission or appointment. It is not in man to hinder that which has been once resolved on in thy decrees. We know, therefore, that it is not in our power to divert those judgments which are coming upon us, but thou canst moderate and limit them as thou pleasest. If, then, it be thy will that we should feel the awful effects of thy justice, chastise us, but spare our weakness; correct us, but with judgment, not in thine anger, &c. Theodoret applies this to Nebuchadnezzar, and explains the passage thus: “We know, O Lord, that the prince whom thou sendest against us comes not without thy orders; that the success of his arms, and the good fortune of his enterprise, proceed only from thee: but deliver us, O Lord, from this terrible enemy; and if we have merited chastisement, may we receive it at thy hand. Punish us as a father, and not as a judge.” The words, however, are applicable to us all, as well as to Nebuchadnezzar and the Jews. We are not at our own disposal, nor able to direct our own way by our own wisdom, either in matters temporal or spiritual. Nor are we at liberty to choose what line of life we please, or to ensure to ourselves the success and prosperity we may desire. We are under God’s government, and at his disposal, and have continual need of his direction, and of the influence of his grace, without which we shall certainly err from the right way, and shall neither choose nor perform what is truly and lastingly good, and for our happiness.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/jeremiah-10.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The way, &c. Notwithstanding man's free-will, yet he can do no good without God's help, nor evil without his permission. So that, in the present case, all the evils which Nabuchodonosor was about to bring upon Jerusalem, could not have come but by the will of God. (Challoner) (Worthington) --- This prince succeeds by thy order. (Theodoret) --- Yet chastise us as a father, and have us not to his fury, ver. 24. (Calmet) --- "Let new preachers blush, who say that each one is governed by his own will," (St. Jerome; chap. ix. 23.) and able to do good without God's grace. (Haydock)


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

is not in = belongs not to.

it is not. Some codices, with two early printed editions, Aramaean, Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate, read "nor".

direct = establish.


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

O LORD, I know that the way of man is not in himself: it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.

Despairing of influencing the people, he turns to God.

Way of man not in himself - (Proverbs 16:1, "The preparations of the heart in man, and the answer of the tongue, is from the Lord;" Proverbs 20:24; James 4:13-14). I know, O Yahweh, that the march of the Babylonian conqueror against me (Jeremiah identifying himself with his people) is not at his own discretion, but is overruled by thee (Isaiah 10:5-7, "O Assyrian, the rod of mine anger ... against the people of my wrath will I give him a charge;" cf. Jeremiah 10:19).

That walketh - when he walketh, i:e., sets out in any undertaking.

To direct his steps - to give a prosperous issue to (Psalms 37:23, "The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord: and He delighteth in his way") his movement.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

O LORD, I know that the way of man is not in himself: it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.
Psalms 17:5; 37:23; 119:116,117; Proverbs 16:1; 20:24

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 10:23". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-10.html.

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