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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 21:2

 

 

"Please inquire of the LORD on our behalf, for Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon is warring against us; perhaps the LORD will deal with us according to all His wonderful acts, so that the enemy will withdraw from us."

Adam Clarke Commentary

Inquire, I pray thee - See whether God intends to deliver us into or out of the hand of the Chaldeans.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-21.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Nebuchadrezzar - A more correct way of spelling the name than Nebuchadnezzar.

According to all his wondrous works - The king and his envoys expected some such answer as Isaiah had given on a former occasion Isaiah 37:6.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-21.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Inquire, I pray thee, of the Lord for us,.... Or, "seek the Lord now for us"F14דרש נא בעדנו "interroga nunc pro nobis", Vatablus: Pagninus; "inquire nunc", Montanus. ; seek the Lord by prayer and supplication for me and my people, for this city and the inhabitants of it; entreat him that he would appear for us, and deliver us out of the hands of the enemy; for this they said in the name of the king that sent them, who knew that the prophet had an interest at the throne of grace, and was a favourite of heaven; and therefore desired him to be an intercessor for them:

for Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon maketh war against us; the same that is elsewhere called Nebuchadnezzar, commonly called by the Greeks Nebuchodonosor; he was now come up to Jerusalem, and was besieging it, as had been predicted:

if so be the Lord will deal with us according to all his wondrous works; which he had done in times past for that nation; as by bringing them out of Egypt; driving out the Canaanites before them; delivering them out of the hands of their neighbours, time after time, when oppressed by them; and particularly by destroying the Assyrian army in Hezekiah's time, which was besieging the city of Jerusalem, and causing their king to depart and flee in haste; and their present case being similar to that, it is very likely that that was more especially in view:

that he may go up from us; namely, the king of Babylon; that he may rise up, and raise the siege, and depart into his own country, as Sennacherib did.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-21.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

a Enquire, I pray thee, of the LORD for us; for Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon maketh war against us; it may be that the LORD will deal with us according to all his wondrous works, that he may go up from us.

(a) Not that the king was touched with repentance of his sins and so sought God, as did Hezekiah when he sent for Isaiah, (2 Kings 19:1) ; (Isaiah 37:2) but because the prophet might pray to God to take this present plague away, as Pharaoh sought Moses (Exodus 9:28).

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-21.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Nebuchadrezzar — the more usual way of spelling the name in Jeremiah than Nebuchadnezzar. From Persiac roots, meaning either “Nebo, the chief of the gods,” or, “Nebo, the god of fire.” He was son of Nabopolassar, who committed the command of the army against Egypt, at Carchemish, and against Judea, to the crown prince.

according to all his wondrous works — Zedekiah hopes for God‘s special interposition, such as was vouchsafed to Hezekiah against Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:35, 2 Kings 19:36).

he — Nebuchadnezzar.

go up from usrise up from the siege which he sat down to lay (Jeremiah 37:5, Jeremiah 37:11, Margin; Numbers 16:24, Numbers 16:27; 1 Kings 15:19, Margin).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-21.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Enquire, I pray thee, of the LORD for us; for Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon maketh war against us; if so be that the LORD will deal with us according to all his wondrous works, that he may go up from us.

Enquire — Zedekiah, as he was none of the best, so he was none of the worst of the kings of Judah. Having some reverence of God, he sends the prophet to enquire of the Lord.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-21.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

He then adds, If Jehovah will deal with us according to all his wondrous works (19) We again see that Zedekiah had some sense of religion; but it was very evanescent; for he was not influenced by any real impression, being like hypocrites who wish, as it has been said, to have peace with God, provided it be on their own terms. But as they are unwilling wholly to surrender themselves to God, they take a circuituous course, and seek to allure God to themselves, at least they come not to him except through various windings, and not in a direct way. Hence Zedekiah refers here to God’s miraculous works which had been wrought in behalf of the Israelites in all ages; as though he had said, “God has hitherto dealt; in a wonderful manner with his chosen people, and whenever he brought help to our fathers, he manifested wonderful proofs of his power; will he not deal with us at this day in the same manner?” He assumes the principle, that God’s covenant remained inviolable; and this was quite true, but the application was false; for Zedekiah and the whole people ought to have kept faith with God. For if they wished God to be propitious to them, why did they not in return worship and serve him as their God? But as they were covenant-breakers, how foolishly and vainly did they allege God’s covenant, which they themselves had rendered void? But it is usual with hypocrites to apply to themselves every favor which God shews to his own children; for they falsely assume the name as a covering, and say, that they are members of the Church because God had adopted them. This was the reason why Zedekiah asked whether God would do according to his wonderful works, as though he had said, “Surely God is ever like himself, and we are his people; and as he has so often delivered his Church, and in such various ways, his power has always been wonderfully displayed; why, then, will he not deal with us in the same manner?”

He at last, adds, that he may ascend from us, (20) that is, that the King Nebuchadnezzar may raise the siege and leave us free.

2.Pray now for us to Jehovah; for Nebuchadrezzar, the king of Babylon, is warring against us: it may be that Jehovah will deal with us according to all his wondrous works, and make him to depart from us.

The verb דרש, transitively as here, means to seek: see Psalms 34:5. And to seek the favor of Jehovah, or to pray to him, seems most consistent with the latter part of the verse. Blayney’s rendering is, “Intreat, we pray thee, Jehovah for us;” and this is the meaning taken by Venema and Gataker. — Ed


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-21.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 21:2 Enquire, I pray thee, of the LORD for us; for Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon maketh war against us; if so be that the LORD will deal with us according to all his wondrous works, that he may go up from us.

Ver. 2. Inquire, I pray thee, of the Lord for us.] He seeketh now to the Lord, whom in his prosperity he regarded not; so doth a drowning man catch at the tree or twig, which before he made no reckoning of. Rarae fumant felicibus arae. "In their affliction they will seek me early." [Hosea 5:15] "When he slew them, then they sought him, and inquired early after God." [Psalms 78:34] Pharaoh, when plagued, calleth earnestly for Moses to pray for him; and Joab, when in danger of his life, runneth to the horns of the altar.

If so be the Lord will deal with us according to his wondrous works.] Or, It may be the Lord will deal with us, &c. - scil., As he did not long since with Hezekiah, when invaded by Sennacherib. Thus wicked wretches are willing to presume, and promise themselves impunity. See Deuteronomy 29:19. {See Trapp on "Deuteronomy 29:19"}


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-21.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Zedekiah, as he was none of the best, so he was none of the worst, of the kings of Judah; be had some convictions and impressions (possibly from his education) not worn off; and having some reverence of God, he sends to the prophet to inquire of the Lord, because the

king of Babylon was come up to make war against them. It is true, the greatest contemners of God and his faithful ministers will sometimes, in great straits, choose to send for them rather than those who in their prosperity pleased them. Hence we read of Saul, when he went to the witch at Endor, desiring that Samuel might be raised up. But in Zedekiah’s whole story we read no such eminent contempt of God, but a disobedience to the commands of God, proceeding rather from his easiness to be ruled by his corrupt court, than from a stubbornness in himself. By mentioning God’s former

wondrous works, possibly he may have a respect to God’s raising Sennacherib’s siege in the time of his grandfather Hezekiah. The remembering of God’s former wondrous works is of use to raise in us a hope and confidence in God for further deliverances, supposing ourselves under the same circumstances of obedience to God’s will; otherwise not, as we shall see in the case of Judah and its king at this time; therefore Zedekiah saith,

if so be. Guilt of sin hinders confidence and holy boldness in the best: but as the guilt is greater, so the hope or confidence of any is justly less.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-21.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2. Inquire — Not pray for deliverance, but ask for a revelation. Perhaps the memory of Sennacherib’s miraculous discomfiture inspired the hope of a similar interference.

Nebuchadrezzar — This is the common orthography of this name in Jeremiah and Ezekiel, and is closer to the original than our Nebuchadnezzar.

According to all his wondrous works — This expression confirms the intimation given above, that they may have had hope of miraculous help.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-21.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Zedekiah asked Jeremiah to inquire of the Lord whether He would give Judah deliverance from Nebuchadnezzar as He had delivered His people in the past. King Hezekiah had sent a similar group to Isaiah inquiring about the approaching Assyrian army ( 2 Kings 19:2; Isaiah 37:2). Nebuchadnezzar, sometimes referred to as Nebuchadrezzar (the spelling nearer to the Babylonian form of his name), ruled Babylon from605 to562 B.C. He succeeded his father, Nabopolassar, the first king of the Neo-Babylonian empire, who ruled from626 to605 B.C. This is the first reference to Nebuchadnezzar in Jeremiah.

Zedekiah may have been hoping for a miraculous deliverance such as Jehoshaphat experienced from the Moabites, Ammonites, and Meunites ( 2 Chronicles 20). Hezekiah had also experienced supernatural deliverance when Sennacherib besieged Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 19; Isaiah 37).


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-21.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Jeremiah 21:2. Inquire, I pray thee, of the Lord for us — As Zedekiah was not one of the best, so he was not one of the worst of the kings of Judah. Having some reverence for God, he sends the prophet to inquire of him. Or, as the word דרשׁ, signifies, to seek or apply to God by prayer and supplication: see Isaiah 55:6. If so be the Lord will deal with us, &c. —

If he will show his wonderful power, in giving us a total deliverance from the hands of our enemies, the Chaldeans. If they had attended to the predictions of the prophets they would not have made this inquiry of Jeremiah; for all the things which had happened to them already, had been predicted by the prophets. But perhaps they flattered themselves that all God’s threatenings would not be executed; or that they had been executed already, in great numbers of them being carried into captivity, first in the reign of Jehoiakim, and afterward in that of Jehoiachin.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/jeremiah-21.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.

Nebuchadrezzar. First occurrence in Jeremiah.

go up from us: i.e. raise the siege.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-21.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Inquire, I pray thee, of the LORD for us; for Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon maketh war against us; if so be that the LORD will deal with us according to all his wondrous works, that he may go up from us.

Nebuchadrezzar - the more usual way of spelling the name in Jeremiah than Nebuchadnezzar: from Persean roots, meaning either 'Nebo, the chief of the gods,' or 'Nebo, the god of fire.' He was son of Nabopolassar, who committed the command of the army against Egypt, at Carchemish, and against Judea, to the crown-prince.

If so be that the Lord will deal with us according to all his wondrous works - Zedekiah hopes for God's special interposition, such as was vouchsafed to Hezekiah against Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:35-36).

That he-Nebuchadnezzar-may go up from us - rise up from the siege which he sat down to lay (Jeremiah 37:5; Jeremiah 37:11, margin, 'made to ascend;' Numbers 16:24; Numbers 16:27; 1 Kings 15:19, margin, 'go up').


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-21.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) Nebuchadrezzar.—This form of the name, as might be expected in the writings of one who was personally brought into contact with the king and his officers, is more correct than that of Nebuchadnezzar, which we find elsewhere, and even in Jeremiah’s own writings (Jeremiah 34:1; Jeremiah 39:5).

The name has been variously interpreted by scholars as “Nebo protects against misfortune,” “Nebo protects the land-marks,” “Nebo protects the crown,” or “Fire, the shining God.”

If so be that the Lord will deal with us . . .—The messengers come to inquire of the prophet, and yet suggest the answer which he is expected to give. Jehovah is to show His wondrous works in the deliverance of the city. The history of Sennacherib’s army (2 Kings 19; Isaiah 37) was probably present to their minds. It was apparently an attempt on the part of the king and his counsellors, under the show of a devout reverence, to entice Jeremiah to change his tone and side with the policy of resistance to the Chaldæans. In Jeremiah 37:3 we have another like mission, coming apparently at a somewhat later date in the reign of Zedekiah

That he may go up from us.—i.e., in modern phraseology, that he may “raise the siege.”


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-21.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Enquire, I pray thee, of the LORD for us; for Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon maketh war against us; if so be that the LORD will deal with us according to all his wondrous works, that he may go up from us.
Enquire
37:3,7; 38:14-27; 42:4-6; Judges 20:27; 1 Samuel 10:22; 28:6,15; 1 Kings 14:2,3; 22:3-8; 2 Kings 1:3; 3:11-14; 22:13,14; Ezekiel 14:3-7; 20:1-3
for
32:24; 39:1,2; 52:3-6; 2 Kings 25:1,2
according
Exodus 14:1-15; Joshua 10:1-11; Judges 4:1-5; 1 Samuel 7:10-12; 14:6-14; 1 Samuel 17:45-50; 2 Chronicles 14:9-13; 20:1-30; 32:21; Psalms 44:1-4; 46:8-11; Psalms 48:4-8; 105:5-45; 136:1-26; Isaiah 59:1,2

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 21:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-21.html.

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