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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 26:1

 

 

In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah, this word came from the LORD, saying,

Adam Clarke Commentary

In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim - As this prophecy must have been delivered in the first or second year of the reign of Jehoiakim, it is totally out of its place here. Dr. Blayney puts it before chap. 36.; and Dr. Dahler immediately after chap. ix., and before chap. 46.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-26.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Jeremiah 26:4-6 contain a summary of the prediction contained in Jeremiah 7, and that again is but an outline of what was a long address.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-26.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

JEREMIAH 26

JEREMIAH WAS TRIED ON CAPITAL CHARGES

This chapter is dated "early in the reign of Jehoiachim," which is supposed to be a technical term indicating the time between his accession to the throne and the New Year following that event. Some dispute this; and there are several opinions held by various scholars regarding the date, which seems certainly to have been at some point in the reign of Jehoiachim. "Most of the present-day expositors date the chapter in 609-608 B.C."[1]

Another disputed interpretation relates this chapter to chapter 7, in which is recorded the prophecy of God's forthcoming destruction of Jerusalem; of course, the same prophecy, or another one much like it, is in Jeremiah 25 (immediately preceding). Some have supposed that the specific prophecy of the seventy years captivity in Jeremiah 25 was what actually precipitated the death-threatening procedure against Jeremiah. Of course, Keil and others do not agree with the alleged connection between Jeremiah 7 and Jeremiah 25; but as Feinberg noted, "The affinities between the chapters are too many and too minute for them not to relate to the same address."[2]

Barnes understood that, "This chapter is a narrative of the danger to which Jeremiah was exposed by reason of his prophecy in Jeremiah 7. Jeremiah 26:6-7 here contain a summary of that prophecy; and that, again, is only an outline of what was a long address."[3]

The violation of all conceptions of chronological order is a phenomenon of Biblical literature; and, as Cheyne declared, "It is only natural to expect it in Jeremiah."[4]

Cawley and Millard began their final division of the Book of Jeremiah with this chapter, lumping the rest of the book (Jeremiah 26-52) into a single division entitled "Historical Narratives."[5] This treatment of the Book of Jeremiah appeals to this writer. However, those who prefer further divisions may find Ash's system satisfactory. He divided the rest of the book as follows:

V. Jeremiah and the False Prophets (Jeremiah 26-29).

VI. The book of Consolation (Jeremiah 30-33).

VII. In the Days of Jehoiachim, Zedekiah (Jeremiah 35-39).

VIII. After the Fall of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40-45).

IX. Oracles Concerning the Nations (Jeremiah 46-51).

X. An Historical Appendix (Jeremiah 52).[6]

The divisions of this chapter suggested by Henderson are: Jeremiah announces the doom of Jerusalem as God commanded him (Jeremiah 26:1-6); the false prophets and the priests at once accuse him of blasphemy and declare him to be worthy of death (Jeremiah 26:7-11); Jeremiah pleads his innocence (Jeremiah 26:12-15); the elders and princes decide in favor of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:16-19); the execution of Uriah (Jeremiah 26:20-23); and Ahikam rescues and protects Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:24).

The uncertainty which exists regarding the connection between the various chapters in this part of Jeremiah was noted by Smith who pointed out that, "Ewald considered these next three chapters as a historical supplement regarding the distinction between true and false prophecy; Havernick thought that the purpose of Jeremiah 26 was to prove that the Jews had rejected the prophets; Keil related it to the vindication of the truth of the prophecy that the captivity would last seventy years. All this is unsatisfactory; it is better to treat the chapter as a unit, complete in itself, and as connected with Jeremiah 7."[7]

Jeremiah 26:1-7

"In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiachim the son of Josiah, king of Judah, came this word from Jehovah, saying. Thus saith Jehovah: Stand in the court of Jehovah's house, and speak unto all the cities of Judah, which come to worship in Jehovah's house, all the words that I command thee to speak unto them; diminish not a word. It may be they will hearken, and turn every man from his evil way; that I may repent me of the evil which I purposed to do unto them because of the evil of their doings. And thou shalt say unto them, Thus saith Jehovah: If ye will not hearken to me, to walk in my law, which I have set before you, to hearken to the words of my servants the prophets, whom I send unto you, even rising up early and sending them, but ye have not hearkened; then will I make this house like Shiloh, and will make this city a curse to all the nations of the earth. And the priests and the prophets and all the people heard Jeremiah speaking these words in the house of Jehovah."

"Stand in the court of Jehovah's house ..." (Jeremiah 26:4). This location enabled Jeremiah to preach to the greatest number of the throngs of people from all the cities of Judah, who were gathering upon some national feast-day.

"And turn every man from his evil way ..." (Jeremiah 26:3). Feinberg stressed two things of singular importance in this passage: "(1) The kind of repentance which God demands is always an individual matter; and (2) promises of divine judgment are always conditional."[8]

"Walk in my law ... hearken to the words of my servants the prophets ..." (Jeremiah 26:4-5). God's condemnation did not result from their refusal to hearken to Jeremiah, merely; but it was the consequence of their rejection of all of God's prophets, reaching all the way back to Moses and the sacred terms of the Old Sinaitic Covenant itself, all of this instruction being evident right here in this passage.

The great things that stand out in this paragraph are: (1) the necessity of obeying God's law, if the forthcoming destruction is to be averted; (2) the terrible nature of the doom awaiting them if they did not repent; (3) Shiloh was cited as an example of the destruction that awaited Jerusalem and the temple.

The significance of the citation of Shiloh derived from the fact of its having been the very first place where the ark of the Lord rested after Israel's entry into the promised land.

The Bible makes no specific reference to the occasion of Shiloh's destruction, and critics once disputed it; but "The Danish expedition uncovered pottery and other evidence demonstrating that the destruction of Shiloh occurred, by the hands of the Philistines about 1050 B.C."[9] The mention of this fact here was intended to refute the arrogant confidence of those Israelites who supposed that the existence of a mere building was their guarantee of safety no matter what they did, a guarantee which they erroneously ascribed to the existence of the temple.

As this narrative proceeds, it will be evident that "all the people" were a very fickle and undependable element discernible in this shameful trial of Jeremiah.

"The priests, and the prophets, and all the people ..." (Jeremiah 26:7). These were the enemies of Jeremiah. It should not be thought that the "prophets" were in any sense true prophets. These characters are mentioned in Jeremiah 26:7,8,11,16; and the LXX designates them as "pseudo-prophets."[10] That irresponsible and fickle Jerusalem mob, designated here as "all the people," that is, the majority, started yelling for the death of the holy Prophet. They were fit ancestors indeed of the mob in that same city centuries afterward who would cry, Crucify Him! Crucify Him!


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/jeremiah-26.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah king of Judah,.... So that the prophecy of this chapter, and the facts and events connected with it, were before the prophecy of the preceding chapter, though here related; that being in the fourth year, this in the beginning of Jehoiakim's reign. Josiah was lately dead; Jehoahaz his son reigned but three months, and then was deposed by Pharaohnecho king of Egypt; and this Jehoiakim, another son of Josiah, who before was called Eliakim, was set on the throne; and quickly after his coming to it

came this word from the Lord, saying; as follows, to the prophet. This was in the year of the world 3394, and before Christ 610, according to Bishop UsherF1Annales Vet. Test. p. 118. ; with whom agree Mr, WhistonF2Chronological Tables, cent. 9. , and the authors of the Universal HistoryF3Vol. 21. p. 58. .


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-26.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Jeremiah 26:1-24. Jeremiah declared worthy of death, but by the interposition of Ahikam saved; The similar cases of Micah and Urijah being adduced in the prophet‘s favor.

The prophecies which gave the offense were those given in detail in the seventh, eighth, and ninth chapters (compare Jeremiah 26:6 here with Jeremiah 7:12, Jeremiah 7:14); and summarily referred to here [Maurer], probably pronounced at one of the great feasts (that of tabernacles, according to Ussher; for the inhabitants of “all the cities of Judah” are represented as present, Jeremiah 26:2). See on Jeremiah 7:2.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

This chapter contains a remarkable history, to which a very useful doctrine is annexed, for Jeremiah speaks of repentance, which forms one of the main points of true religion, and he shews at the same time that the people were rejected by God, because they perversely despised all warnings, and could by no means be brought to a right mind. We shall find these two things in this chapter.

He says that this word came to him at the beginning of the reign, of Jehoiakim, of which king we have spoken in other places, where Jeremiah related other discourses delivered in his reign. We hence conclude that this book was not put together in a regular order, but that the chapters were collected, and from them the volume was formed.

The time, however, is not here repeated in vain, for we know that the miserable derive some hope from new events. When men have been long afflicted and well-nigh have rotted in their evils, they yet think, when a change takes place, that they shall be happy, and they promise themselves vain hopes. Such was probably the confidence of the people when Jehoiakim began to reign; for they might have thought that things would be restored by him to a better state. There is also another circumstance to be noticed; though their condition was nigh past hope, they yet hardened themselves against God, so that they obstinately resisted the prophets. It hence appears that the reprobate were become more and more exasperated by the scourges of God, and had never been truly and really humbled. This was the reason why Jeremiah, according to God’s command, spoke so sharply.

I pass by other things and come to the words, that the word of Jehovah came to him. He thus arrogated nothing to himself; but he testifies how necessary it was, especially among a people so refractory, that he should bring nothing of his own, but announce a truth that came from heaven. A general subject might be here handled, which is, that God alone is to be heard in the Church, and also that no one ought to assume to himself the name of a prophet or teacher, except he whom the Lord has formed and appointed, and to whom he has committed his message; but these things have been treated elsewhere and often and much at large; and I do not willingly dwell long on general subjects. It is then enough to bear in mind the purpose for which Jeremiah says that the word of Jehovah came to him, even that he might secure authority to himself; he does not boast of his own wisdom nor of anything human or earthly, but says only that he spoke what the Lord had commanded him.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-26.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 26:1 In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah king of Judah came this word from the LORD, saying,

Ver. 1. In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim.] What a sudden change was here, soon after the death of good Josiah! And was there not the like in England after the death of that English Josiah, Edward VI? Within a very few days of Queen Mary’s reign were various learned and godly men in various parts committed to prison for religion, and Mr Rogers, the proto-martyr, put to death, as was that holy prophet of God, Uriah the son of Shemaiah of Kirjathjearim, not many weeks before Jeremiah was apprehended and questioned for his life, as is here related, his adversaries being pricked on by pride and malice.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-26.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

The Prophet Jeremiah continuing still to prophesy, so irritated the carnal Jews, that they arose against him to put him to death; but the Lord delivered him. In this Chapter this history is related.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/jeremiah-26.html. 1828.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 26:1. In the beginning of the reign of Jehoakim This prophesy is prior in time to that in the preceding chapter. That was delivered in the fourth year of king Jehoiakim; and this at the beginning, or some time in the first year of his reign. See Calmet.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-26.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JEREMIAH CHAPTER 26

The prophet, by God’s command, in the court of the temple, threateneth that the temple shall be as Shiloh, and the land a curse: exhorteth to repentance, Jeremiah 26:1-7. He is apprehended and arraigned, Jeremiah 26:8-11. His apology, Jeremiah 26:12-15. The princes clear him by the example of Micah, Jeremiah 26:16-19, and of Urijah, Jeremiah 26:20-23, and by the care of Ahikam, Jeremiah 26:24.

The prophecy, Jer 25, is said to have been revealed in the fourth year of Jehoiakim, this in the beginning of his reign, which makes learned men think it ought to have been placed before that. The affairs of the Jews were then in a very desperate condition; Pharaoh-nechoh king of Egypt had overcome Josiah, and killed him in battle, Jehoahaz or Shallum being made king in his stead, 2 Kings 23:30; he had reigned but three months, and Pharaoh-nechoh taketh him, and imprisoned him, and lays a tribute upon the land of three hundred talents of silver, and a talent of gold, and makes Eliakim king, changing his name to Jehoiakim, 2 Kings 23:33,34. Now in the beginning of this king’s reign cometh this word of God to Jeremiah, the people being still hardened and going on in their sinful practices.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-26.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1. In the beginning, etc. — This phrase clearly indicates a time before the memorable fourth year of this king, in which, took place the first deportation to Babylon.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-26.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Another message from Yahweh came to Jeremiah at the beginning of King Jehoiakim"s reign. Jehoiakim began reigning over Judah in609 B.C. The terminology used to describe the date is technical, referring to the time between the king"s accession to the throne and the first full year of his reign. [Note: Thompson, p524.] This is the earliest date mentioned in the book, with the exception of Jeremiah"s call ( Jeremiah 1:2).

"Little more than three months had seen King Josiah killed in battle, his successor deported to Egypt, and this third king, a man of no scruples, imposed on the country. At such a moment, to give strong warnings of potentially worse things in store was to take one"s life in one"s hands, especially when these warnings touched the temple and the holy city, popularly thought to be inviolable." [Note: Kidner, p96.]


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-26.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Jeremiah 26:1. In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim, &c. — The preceding chapter is dated in the fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim, but ascribed, with probability, to the early part of that year. This chapter is dated in the beginning of the same reign. Hence it has been concluded, that this must have preceded the former in order of time. “But the conclusion,” says Blaney, “will not hold, if we consider that, (Jeremiah 28:1,) the beginning of Zedekiah’s reign is expressly declared to mean the fourth year and the fifth month of it. The same therefore may be the case here,” and this chapter may be allowed to speak of events subsequent to those of the foregoing one, though taking place immediately after them.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/jeremiah-26.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Beginning, after Joakim had reigned some time, ver. 21.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-26.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Jeremiah"s Seventeenth Prophecy (see book comments for Jeremiah).

In the beginning: i.e. before the siege, in the third year of Jehoiakim. See note on Jeremiah 27:1.

The first edition of the Prophets (Naples, 1485-6), the first edition of the entire Hebrew Bible (Soncino 1488), and the second edition (Naples, 1491-3), introduce the word hazi = half, here, to indicate that the second half of Jeremiah commences here.

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-26.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah king of Judah came this word from the LORD, saying,

The prophecies which gave the offence were those given in detail in Jeremiah 7:1-34; Jeremiah 8:1-22; Jeremiah 9:1-26 (cf. Jeremiah 26:6, "I will make this The prophecies which gave the offence were those given in detail in Jeremiah 7:1-34; Jeremiah 8:1-22; Jeremiah 9:1-26 (cf. Jeremiah 26:6, "I will make this house like Shiloh," here, with Jeremiah 7:12; Jeremiah 7:14); and summarily referred to here (Maurer), probably pronounced at one of the great feasts (that of Tabernacles, according to Usher; because the inhabitants of "all the cities of Judah" are represented as present, Jeremiah 26:2). See note, Jeremiah 7:1.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XXVI.

(1) In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim.—The section which follows is among the earlier fragments of the book, some three years before that of the preceding chapter. It will be noted that there is no mention of the Chaldaeans, and that Jehoiakim is on friendly terms with Egypt (Jeremiah 26:22). This points to the very earliest period of his reign. The chapter that follows, though referred to the same period in the present Hebrew text, really belongs to the reign of Zedekiah. (See Note on Jeremiah 27:1.) The common element that led the compiler of the book to bring the narratives together is the conflict of Jeremiah with the false prophets.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-26.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah king of Judah came this word from the LORD, saying,
A. M. 3394. B.C. 610
1:3; 25:1; 27:1; 35:1; 36:1; 2 Kings 23:34-36; 2 Chronicles 36:4,5

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-26.html.

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