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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 26:11

 

 

Then the priests and the prophets spoke to the officials and to all the people, saying, "A death sentence for this man! For he has prophesied against this city as you have heard in your hearing."

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

This man is worthy to die - literally, A sentence of death is to this man, i. e., is his desert.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-26.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then spake the priests and the prophets unto the princes, and to all the people,.... The priests and the prophets they were the accusers; the princes were the court before whom the cause was brought; and the people were the hearers of it; though it does not seem as if they were a sort of jury, or had any vote in determining; though they sometimes had in instigating a court, and the judges of it, to take on the side of the question they were for:

saying, this man is worthy to die; or, "the judgment of death is to this man"F6משפט מות לאיש הזה "judieium mortis est viro huic", V. L. Vatablus, Pagninus, Montanus; "reatus mortis", &c. Schmidt. ; he is guilty of a capital crime, and judgment ought to be given against him, and he condemned to die:

for he hath prophesied against this city; the city of Jerusalem; saying that it should be a curse to other nations; or, as they interpreted it, that it should be utterly destroyed, and become desolate, and none should inhabit it:

as ye have heard with your ears; this must be directed to the people only; for the princes did not hear Jeremiah's prophecy.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-26.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then spake the priests and the prophets unto the princes and to all the people, saying, This man is worthy to die; for he hath prophesied against this city, as ye have heard with your ears.

The priests — "In the corrupt state of all kingdoms, the ecclesiastical officers always were the greatest enemies to the faithful ministers of God." They speak to the members of the court who are called princes, and to the people who were in the court.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-26.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

We hence conclude, that the people in assenting to the sentence of the priests and prophets, had done nothing according to their own judgment, but that all of every rank through a violent feeling condemned Jeremiah. And as the priests and prophets directed also their discourse to the people, it appears clear, that they were guided by them, so that they thoughtlessly and inconsiderately gave their consent; for it often happens in a mob that the people exclaim, “Be it so, be it so; amen, amen.” Jeremiah has indeed said, that he was condemned by the whole people; but it must be observed, that the people are like the sea, which of itself is calm and tranquil; but as soon as any wind arises, there is a great commotion, and waves dash one against another; so also it is with the people, who without being excited are quiet and peaceable; but a sedition is easily raised, when any one stirs up men who are thoughtless and changeable, and who, to retain the same simile, are fluid like water. This, then, is what Jeremiah now intimates.

But there is another thing to be noticed, — that the common people suffer themselves to be drawn in all directions; but they may also be easily restored, as it has been said, to a right mind. “When they see,” says Virgil, “a man remarkable for piety and good works, they become silent and attend with listening ears.” He there describes (Aeneid, 1) a popular commotion, which he compares to a tempest; and he rightly speaks of a tempest; but he added this simile according to common usage. The same thing is now set before us by the Prophet; the priests and prophets, who thought that they alone could boast of their power and speak with authority, in a manner constrained the people apparently to consent. The king’s counsellors being now present, the people became as it were mute; the priests perceived this, and we shall see by the issue that what the same poet mentions took place, “By his words he rules their hearts and softens their breasts.” For it became easy for the king’s counsellors even by a word to calm this foolish violence of the people. We shall indeed soon see, that they unhesitantly said, “There is no judgment of death against this man.” It is hence evident how easily ignorant men may be made inconsistent with themselves; but this is to be ascribed to their inconstancy; and noticed also ought to be what I have said, that there was no real consent, because there was no judgment exercised. The authority of the priests overpowered them; and then they servilely confessed what they saw pleased their princes, like an ass, who nods with his ears.

Now, when the subject is duly considered, it appears, that the priests and the prophets alone spoke both to the princes and to the whole people, that Jeremiah was guilty of death, (165) because he had prophesied against the city. We have said that they relied on those promises, which they absurdly applied for the purpose of confirming their own impiety, even that God had chosen that city that he might be there worshipped. It was a false principle, and whence proceeded their error? not from mere ignorance, but rather from presumption, for hypocrites are never deceived, except when they determine not to obey God, and as far as they can to reject his judgments. When, therefore, they are carried away by a perverse and wicked impulse, they ever find out some plausible pretext; but it is nothing but a disguise, as we clearly see from this narrative. It follows, —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-26.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

this man

(See Scofield "Jeremiah 38:4").


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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Jeremiah 26:11". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/jeremiah-26.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

‘IN PERILS BY MY COUNTRYMEN’

‘This man is worthy to die.… This man is not worthy to die.’

Jeremiah 26:11; Jeremiah 26:16

I. Jeremiah was never so near martyrdom as at the time described in this chapter.—The old hatred of the priest and the false prophet arose against him, and communicated itself to the people. In miniature it was a similar incident to the closing scene of our Saviour’s life. The accusation against our Lord, as against Jeremiah, was that He had anticipated the destruction of the Temple. If any man dare to speak his mind to-day, if it conflicts with the prevailing sentiment, how certainly will he have to pay the price of hatred! Is it for this reason that the Christian Church refrains at the present juncture from insisting on our Lord’s command to love our enemies, and do good to those who are in arms against us?

II. The princes interfered, and their appeal to the people seems to have turned the fickle populace to be as antagonistic to the false priests as they had previously been to the prophet.—Notice specially Jeremiah 26:16. How fickle is the voice of the people. ‘Hosanna,’ to-day; to-morrow, ‘Crucify.’ Let us dare to do right in the sight of God, following out the impulse of His Spirit, and ceasing from man whose breath is in his nostrils.

Illustration

‘The Jews saw no discord between the true God and idols, but worshipped both together. And so people see no discord or contrariety between the Christian belief and a worldly practice, simply because they are accustomed to both. A worldly life justifies itself in their eyes because it is common; they take it and the Gospel together and interpret the Gospel accordingly. The old prophets were witnesses against this slavery of men to what is common and customary; they recalled them to the purity of truth, they reminded them of the holiness of God’s law, and they put before them Almighty God as a jealous God, who disdained to be half-obeyed, and abhorred to be served in common with idols.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/jeremiah-26.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 26:11 Then spake the priests and the prophets unto the princes and to all the people, saying, This man [is] worthy to die; for he hath prophesied against this city, as ye have heard with your ears.

Ver. 11. Then spake the priests and the prophets.] Against a priest and a prophet; but he had earnestly inveighed against them, [Jeremiah 23:1-2; Jeremiah 23:14-15; Jeremiah 23:33-34] and hence the hatred. As Erasmus told the Duke of Saxony that Luther had been too busy with the Pope’s triple crown and with the priests’ fat paunches, and was therefore so generally set against.

Saying, This man is worthy to die.] Sic Papicolae nostri saeculi. These are the very words of Popish persecutors.

For he hath prophesied against this city.] This holy, and therefore, it must be believed, inviolable city. Novum crimen, C. Caesar, &c. These sinners against their own souls, traitors also to the state, will neither see their evil condition, nor hear of it from others, as having gall in their ears, as they say of some kinds of creatures.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-26.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 26:11

Why were the Jews so angry with Jeremiah for simply telling them the plain fact of what they did, and what they did not, disguise? Why this unreasonable hatred of the man of God because he pointed to proceedings which were quite open, and which they did not deny? Now, in the first place, when bold, bad men do wicked things which they do not disguise, they do not thereby give the servants of God any permission at all to remind them of them, and make them sensible of the reproach. They will thrust their misdeeds before other people's eyes, but they think their doing this is the very reason why they should not be thrust before their own.

I. This, then, was one chief office which the old prophets had to execute. They had to break down the pride of bold and open vice, where man thought himself privileged to sin; to do what he pleased to defy God. They had to bring down the haughtiness of man's heart and to make it feel the yoke.

II. Besides the great truth that no man was privileged to sin, there was another great truth the old prophets had to declare, and one opposed to as mischievous an error, viz. the truth that no sin was excused by its commonness. The Jews saw no discord between the true God and idols, but worshipped both together. And so people see no discord or contrariety between the Christian belief and a worldly practice, simply because they are accustomed to both. A worldly life justifies itself in their eyes because it is common; they take it and the Gospel together and interpret the Gospel accordingly. The old prophets were witnesses against this slavery of men to what is common and customary; they recalled them to the purity of truth, they reminded them of the holiness of God's law, and they put before them Almighty God as a jealous God, who disdained to be half-obeyed, and abhorred to be served in common with idols.

J. B. Mozley, Sermons Parochial and Occasional, p. 233.


Reference: Jeremiah 28:13.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xviii., No. 1032.




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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/jeremiah-26.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

In the corrupt state of all kingdoms and cities, the ecclesiastical officers always were the greatest enemies to the faithful ministers of God, as we shall find in the whole story both of the Old and New Testament. They speak to the members of the great court, who are called princes, and also to the people who were in the court, charging Jeremiah with sedition, by prophesying falsely, which was a capital crime. It was the charge against Stephen, Acts 6:13, that he spake blasphemous words against the holy place. To prove this they appeal to those of the people that had heard him.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-26.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jeremiah"s accusers demanded that the princes pass a death sentence against the prophet for saying what he did. The Book of Jeremiah records no face-to-face encounter between Jeremiah and King Jehoiakim.

"When a man stands up in the communist or other totalitarian countries today and really speaks of the judgment of God, he gets the same treatment as Jeremiah. Even in the West the results are similar. Men say, "You"re against our culture, you"re against the unity of our culture, you"re against the progress of our culture, you"re against the optimism of our culture, and we"re going to do what we can against you." Our culture may do little if we preach only the positive message but if we are faithful and also preach judgment in state or church, the result will be the same as with Jeremiah." [Note: Schaeffer, p60.]


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-26.html. 2012.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

This man is worthy to die = Death"s judgment is for this man: "judgment" being put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of the Cause), for the effect of it: viz. the sentence of death (idiomatically rendered in Authorized Version.) Compare John 3:19, where krisis is put for the act or process of judging. See App-85.

man. Hebrew. "ish. App-14.

as = according as.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-26.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then spake the priests and the prophets unto the princes and to all the people, saying, This man is worthy to die; for he hath prophesied against this city, as ye have heard with your ears.

No JFB commentary on this verse.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) This man is worthy to die.—Literally, A judgment of death for this man. The phrase seems to have been in current forensic use. (See Deuteronomy 19:6; Deuteronomy 21:22.) Among the accusers we may think of Pashur, the son of Immer (Jeremiah 20:1). Personal rancour mingles with the class feeling which animates the whole body of the priesthood. They appeal to what, in later language, would be known as the secular arm, to be the instrument of their vindictiveness against the heretic and blasphemer.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-26.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then spake the priests and the prophets unto the princes and to all the people, saying, This man is worthy to die; for he hath prophesied against this city, as ye have heard with your ears.
saying
Deuteronomy 18:20; Matthew 26:66; Luke 23:1-5; John 18:30; 19:7; Acts 22:22; 24:4-9; Acts 25:2-13
This man is worthy to die
Heb. The judgment of death is for this man. for he.
38:4; Acts 6:11-14

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-26.html.

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