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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 26:16

 

 

Then the officials and all the people said to the priests and to the prophets, "No death sentence for this man! For he has spoken to us in the name of the LORD our God."

Adam Clarke Commentary

This man is not worthy to die - The whole court acquitted him.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-26.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

This man … - literally, There is not to this man a sentence of death, i. e., he is acquitted by the princes and the congregation.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-26.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Then said the princes and all the people unto the priests and the prophets: This man is not worthy of death; for he hath spoken unto us in the name of Jehovah our God!"

"Then said the princes and all the people ..." (Jeremiah 26:16). Notice that "all the people" have dramatically switched sides. They here stand with the princes and elders against the crooked priests and prophets. What a fickle and changeful thing is a mob of people! (I commented at length on this phenomenon in Vol. I of my New Testament Series, p. 470.)


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/jeremiah-26.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then said the princes and all the people unto the priests and to the prophets,.... Hearing Jeremiah's apology for himself, by which it appeared that he was to be justified in what he had done, took his part, and acquitted him; and the people, who before were on the side of the priests and false prophets; yet hearing what Jeremiah had to say for himself, and also the judgment of the princes, took his part also, and joined with the court in an address to the priests and prophets, who were the chief accusers, and who would fain have had him brought in guilty of death:

this man is not worthy to die; or, "the judgment of death is not for this man"; we cannot give judgment against him; he is not guilty of any crime deserving death; See Gill on Jeremiah 26:11;

for he hath spoken to us in the name of the Lord our God; not in his own name, and of his own head; but in the name of the Lord, and by his order; and therefore was not a false, but a true prophet: what methods they took to know this, and to make it appear to the people, is not said; very probably the settled character of the prophet; their long acquaintance with him, and knowledge of him; his integrity and firmness of mind; the plain marks of seriousness and humility, and a disinterested view, made them conclude in his favour.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-26.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

all the people — The fickle people, as they were previously influenced by the priests to clamor for his death (Jeremiah 26:8), so now under the princes‘ influence require that he shall not be put to death. Compare as to Jesus, Jeremiah‘s antitype, the hosannas of the multitude a few days before the same people, persuaded by the priests as in this case, cried, Away with Him, crucify Him (Matthew 21:1-11; Matthew 27:20-25). The priests, through envy of his holy zeal, were more his enemies than the princes, whose office was more secular than religious. A prophet could not legally be put to death unless he prophesied in the name of other gods (therefore, they say, “in the name of the Lord”), or after his prophecy had failed in its accomplishment. Meanwhile, if he foretold calamity, he might be imprisoned. Compare Micaiah‘s case (1 Kings 22:1-28).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Jeremiah shews here that the sentence pronounced on him by the priests and false prophets was soon changed. They had indeed heard him, and had given some appearance of docility, as it is the case with hypocrites who for a time attend; but they exasperated themselves against God, and as their minds were previously malignant, they were rendered much worse by hearing. So it happened to the priests and false prophets, and in their blind rage they doomed the holy Prophet to death. He now says that he was acquitted by the princes and the king’s counsellors, and also by the votes of the people. The people had, indeed, lately condemned him, but they had been carried away by the vain pomp and splendor of the priests and prophets; when they saw these so incensed against Jeremiah, they could not bring themselves to inquire into the cause. Thus the common people are always blinded by prejudices, so that they will not examine the matter itself. So it was when Jeremiah was condemned. We have said that the people were of themselves quiet and peaceable; but the prophets and priests were the farmers, and hence it was that the people immediately gave their consent. But in the presence of the princes they went in a contrary direction.

This passage, in short, teaches us how mischievous are rulers when there is no regard had for equity or justice; and it also teaches us how desirable it is to have honest and temperate rulers, who defend what is good and just, and aid the miserable and the oppressed. But we see that there is nothing steady or fixed in the common people; for they are carried here and there like the wind, which blows now from this quarter and then from that.

But we must notice this clause, that Jeremiah was not worthy of death, (169) because he had spoken in the name of Jehovah They thus confessed, that whatever came from God ought to have been received, and that men were mad who opposed the servants of God, for they hurried themselves headlong into their own destruction.

We may hence deduce a useful truth, that whatever God has commanded ought, without exception, to be reverently received, and that his name is worthy of such a regard, that we ought to attempt nothing against his servants and prophets. Now, to speak in the name of Jehovah is no other thing than faithfully to declare what God has commanded. The false prophets, indeed, assumed the name of God, but they did so falsely; but the people acknowledge here that Jeremiah was a true prophet, who did not presumptuously thrust in himself, nor falsely pretended God’s name, but who in sincerity performed the duties of his office. It follows, —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-26.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

‘IN PERILS BY MY COUNTRYMEN’

‘This man is worthy to die.… This man is not worthy to die.’

Jeremiah 26:11; Jeremiah 26:16

I. Jeremiah was never so near martyrdom as at the time described in this chapter.—The old hatred of the priest and the false prophet arose against him, and communicated itself to the people. In miniature it was a similar incident to the closing scene of our Saviour’s life. The accusation against our Lord, as against Jeremiah, was that He had anticipated the destruction of the Temple. If any man dare to speak his mind to-day, if it conflicts with the prevailing sentiment, how certainly will he have to pay the price of hatred! Is it for this reason that the Christian Church refrains at the present juncture from insisting on our Lord’s command to love our enemies, and do good to those who are in arms against us?

II. The princes interfered, and their appeal to the people seems to have turned the fickle populace to be as antagonistic to the false priests as they had previously been to the prophet.—Notice specially Jeremiah 26:16. How fickle is the voice of the people. ‘Hosanna,’ to-day; to-morrow, ‘Crucify.’ Let us dare to do right in the sight of God, following out the impulse of His Spirit, and ceasing from man whose breath is in his nostrils.

Illustration

‘The Jews saw no discord between the true God and idols, but worshipped both together. And so people see no discord or contrariety between the Christian belief and a worldly practice, simply because they are accustomed to both. A worldly life justifies itself in their eyes because it is common; they take it and the Gospel together and interpret the Gospel accordingly. The old prophets were witnesses against this slavery of men to what is common and customary; they recalled them to the purity of truth, they reminded them of the holiness of God’s law, and they put before them Almighty God as a jealous God, who disdained to be half-obeyed, and abhorred to be served in common with idols.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/jeremiah-26.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 26:16 Then said the princes and all the people unto the priests and to the prophets; This man [is] not worthy to die: for he hath spoken to us in the name of the LORD our God.

Ver. 16. Then said the princes and all the people.] The mobile vulgus. changeable mob, on Jeremiah 26:9. The good prophet is acquitted, as Athanasius afterwards was often; for if to be accused were enough to make a man guilty, none should be innocent.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-26.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The judges in this case, with the assent of the people, acquit the prophet, and vindicate him from the charge of sedition given against him by the corrupt priests and false prophets, distinguishing betwixt one who of his own head spreadeth false news, and threateneth evil to a place, and one who doth it by authority from God, or by Divine revelation, which is here meant by

in the name of our Lord God. Thus the civil magistrates taught the priests and prophets a point of divinity, which they ought not to have been ignorant of. Some may inquire how the princes knew that Jeremiah spake what he spake in the name of the Lord. To which it may be replied, that Jeremiah had been a prophet now about twenty years, for he began in the thirteenth of Josiah, Jeremiah 1:1,2. Josiah reigned thirty-one years, 2 Kings 22:1. Then Shallum or Jehoahaz reigned three months; this was in the beginning of Jehoiakim’s reign, in which time they had had a large experience both of his doctrine and conversation; and though the priests and prophets, who had had the like experience, were filled with malice and prejudice, yet the princes and a part of the people were more equal; and though the people were many of them led away with the priests, yet hearing the prophet’s defence, and the princes’ judgment upon it, they concur with them to acquit the prophet.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-26.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16. The princes and all the people — The action of these magistrates was worthy of better times. Jeremiah’s simple and heroic words are rightly seen to indicate the true prophet; and so they refuse the popular clamour for his blood. This decision commands the approval of the people, showing that not all had a positive temper against him; but, on the contrary, many were open to feel the force and truthfulness of his words. This trial, in many particulars, answers to that other trial in which the great archetypal Prophet stood before the world’s tribunal, as represented by Pilate, and, by the resistless force of his own divine purity, compelled the verdict, “I find no fault in the man.”


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-26.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The officials and some of the people then defended Jeremiah , saying that he had brought a message from Yahweh, and should not die for having done so. They concluded that he was neither a false prophet nor a blasphemer (cf. John 19:4).


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-26.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

All. The populace easily changes either for better or for worse. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-26.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Then said the princes, &c. In favour of Jeremiah. Note the Structure, p. 1053.

This man, &c. See App-85.

man. Hebrew. "ish. App-14.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-26.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then said the princes and all the people unto the priests and to the prophets; This man is not worthy to die: for he hath spoken to us in the name of the LORD our God.

Then said the princes and all the people. The fickle people, as they were previously influenced by the priests to clamour for his death (Jeremiah 26:8), so now, under the princes' influence, require that he shall not be put to death. Compare as to Jesus, Jeremiah's antitype, the Hosannas of the multitude a few days before the same people, persuaded by the priests as in this case, cried, "Away with Him, crucify Him" (Matthew 21:1-46; Matthew 27:20-25). The priests, through envy of his holy zeal, were more his enemies than the princes, whose office was more secular than religious. A prophet could not legally be put to death unless he prophesied in the name of other gods (therefore, they say, "in the name of THE LORD"); or after that his prophecy had failed in its accomplishment. Meanwhile, if he foretold calamity, he might be imprisoned. (Compare Micaiah's case, 1 Kings 22:1-28).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) This man is not worthy to die.—Literally, as before in Jeremiah 26:11, There is no judgment of death for this man. Here again the later parallel comes unbidden to our memory. The lay-rulers are in favour of the true prophet, whom the priests and false prophets would have condemned. Pilate declares, in presence of priests and scribes, and the clamouring multitude, “I find no fault in this man” (Luke 23:4). Here, however, as yet the people are with the true prophet, and against the priests, as they were when they shouted their Hosannas to the prophet’s great antitype.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-26.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then said the princes and all the people unto the priests and to the prophets; This man is not worthy to die: for he hath spoken to us in the name of the LORD our God.
36:19,25; 38:7-13; Esther 4:14; Proverbs 16:7; Matthew 27:23,24,54; Luke 23:14,15,41,47; Acts 5:34-39; 23:9,29; 25:25; 26:31,32

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-26.html.

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