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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 26:23

 

 

And they brought Uriah from Egypt and led him to King Jehoiakim, who slew him with a sword and cast his dead body into the burial place of the common people.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Out of Egypt - As Jehoiakim was a vassal of Egypt, he would easily obtain the surrender of a man accused of treason.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-26.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And they fetched forth Urijah out of Egypt,.... Having found him, they seized him, and brought him away, with the leave of the king of Egypt: which, no doubt, was easily obtained:

and brought him to Jehoiakim the king, who slew him with the sword; very probably with his own hand; or however it was done by his order, and in his presence, most likely:

and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people; either where they were buried in heaps promiscuously, as some think; or in the common burying ground; and not where persons of distinction were laid, as prophets, and othersF7Vid. Nicolai de Sepulchris Heb. c. 3. p. 126. ; this he did to reflect dishonour upon the prophet.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-26.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And they brought forth Urijah from Egypt, and brought him to Jehoiakim the king; who slew him with the sword, and m cast his dead body into the burial place of the common people.

(m) As in the first Hezekiah's example is to be followed, so in this other Jehoiakim's act it to be abhorred: for God's plague descended on him and his household.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-26.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

graves of the common people — literally, “sons of the people” (compare 2 Kings 23:6). The prophets seem to have had a separate cemetery (Matthew 23:29). Urijah‘s corpse was denied this honor, in order that he should not be regarded as a true prophet.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And they fetched forth Urijah out of Egypt, and brought him unto Jehoiakim the king; who slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people.

Cast his body — Not in the sepulchers of the prophets, but amongst the vulgar people.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-26.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

It is at length added, that they led up Uriah from Egypt, and brought him to King Jehoiakim, who slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people, by way of dishonor; for Jeremiah here calls them the graves of the common people, as we in French call shambles des charniers. The rich are honorably and splendidly buried at this day, and every one has his own grave; but when there is a vast number, the bodies are thrown together, for it would be too expensive to dig a grave for each. It seems also that there was such a practice in Judea, and that God’s Prophet was buried in this ignominious manner.

Thus they who spoke intimated that the king’s wrath so burned, that he not only put him to death, but followed up his vengeance, so that a new disgrace awaited the Prophet, even when dead, for he was cast among the obscure and ignoble common people.

I have hitherto so explained this passage as to leave it doubtful whether the probability is that the speakers were Jeremiah’s enemies or his advocates. And though, as I have declared twice or three times, I reject not the view which is different from that which I embrace, yet it seems most probable to me that the words were spoken by the godly men who defended the cause of Jeremiah. All the various reasons which lead me to this conclusion I will not here specify; for every one may himself see why I prefer this view. The common consent of almost all interpreters also influences me, from which I wish not to depart, except necessity compels me, or the thing itself makes it evident that they were mistaken. But we have seen from the beginning, that the two examples consecutively follow one another, and that nothing intervenes; it may hence be supposed, that the enemies of Jeremiah had previously performed their part. The words themselves then shew that those who commenced the discourse were those who carried it on. And that they did not mention the reason why they adduced this example is not to be wondered at; for the displeasure of the king was feared, and he had given no common proof, in his treatment of the holy Prophet, how impatiently he bore anything that trenched on his own dignity. They therefore cautiously related the matter, and left what they did not express to be collected by those who heard them. But it was easy from their words to know what they meant, — that God’s vengeance was to be dreaded; for one Prophet had been slain; what if there was to be no end to cruelty? would not God at length arise to execute judgment when his servants were so unworthily treated? As, then, the words are not completed, it seems probable to me that God’s true servants spoke thus reservedly and cautiously, because they dared not to express their thoughts openly.

Further, these words, the king sought to slay him, and the king sent men, etc. , are more suitable when considered as spoken by the defenders of Jeremiah than by the ungodly and the wicked; and they also named Elnathan, that they might hand down his name with infamy to future ages. And they lastly added that the Prophet was brought up from Egypt What was very shameful seems certainly to be set here before us, that he was forcibly brought back from that land to which he had fled for an asylum, and also that he was brought to the king, that he smote him with the sword, that is, cruelly killed him; and further, that being not satisfied with this barbarous act, he caused him to be ignominiously buried. All these particulars, as I have said, seem to shew that these words may be more suitably applied to the holy men who defended the cause of Jeremiah than to his enemies. It now follows, —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-26.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 26:23 And they fetched forth Urijah out of Egypt, and brought him unto Jehoiakim the king; who slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people.

Ver. 23. And they set forth Uriah out of Egypt.] As they did here Sir John Cheek out of the Low Countries, and frightened him into a recantation. Not so this Uriah.

And they set forth Uriah out of Egypt.] En collusio principum mundi in parricidio.

Who slew him with the sword.] Without all law, right, or reason. So John Baptist was murdered, as if God had been nothing aware of him, said that martyr. But Jehoiakim got as little by this as he did afterwards by burning Jeremiah’s book; or as Vespasian afterwards did by banishing all the philosophers of his time, because they spake boldly against his vices and tyranny.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-26.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

These persons sent by Jehoiakim brought back the prophet by force; he was tried and cast, judged worthy to die, and put to death, and ignominiously buried, not in the sepulchres of the prophets, or any men of repute and fashion, but amongst the vulgar people; which, as also his diligence to send for Urijah, (fled into a foreign country to save his life,) showed the great malice of this prince against the Lord’s true prophets; though it had but very ill effects. The sum is, (if we take these words as the speech of Jeremiah’s enemies,) What do you tell us of what Hezekiah did, you have a later instance of it in our present king’s time, the cases of Urijah and of Jeremiah are fully parallelled. So as the case is a judged case.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-26.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

23. Common people — See 2 Kings 23:6. The place of this “common” burial ground was in the Kidron valley.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-26.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Egypt, as a seditious person....Joakim was tributary to Pharao.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-26.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

slew him with the sword. Compare Hebrews 11:37.

common People. Hebrew sons of the people.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-26.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And they fetched forth Urijah out of Egypt, and brought him unto Jehoiakim the king; who slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people.

Graves of the common people - literally, son of the people (cf. 2 Kings 23:6; Josiah "cast the powder thereof

(i:e., of the grove-idol) upon the graves of the children of the people"). The prophets seem to have had a separate cemetery (Matthew 23:29). Urijah's corpse was denied this honour, in order that he should not be regarded as a true prophet.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(23) And they fetched forth Urijah out of Egypt.—The martyr-death of the prophet had its parallels in the earlier history of Judah. So Jezebel had slain the prophets of Jehovah with the edge of the sword (1 Kings 18:4; 1 Kings 19:10; 1 Kings 19:14), and Zechariah the son of Jehoiada had been stoned to death at the command of Joash (2 Chronicles 24:21), and Isaiah, as the Jewish tradition runs, had been sawn asunder (Hebrews 11:37). The fact now recorded was to Jewish feeling an act of brutal outrage. The body of the prophet was not allowed to rest in the sepulchre of his fathers, with the due honour of embalmment, but flung into the loathsome pits of “the sons of the people,” in the Kidron valley (2 Kings 23:6). It is not without interest to those who believe in a special as well as righteous retribution, to note the fact that the king who thus added brutality to cruelty was himself afterwards “buried with the burial of an ass,” without honours or lamentations (Jeremiah 22:18-19). For the phrase, “children of the people,” see Note on Jeremiah 17:19. The circumstances are apparently narrated in detail either by the prophet himself or by the compiler of his prophecies, to show how narrow his escape had been.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-26.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And they fetched forth Urijah out of Egypt, and brought him unto Jehoiakim the king; who slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people.
who
15; 2:30; Ezekiel 19:6; Matthew 14:10; 23:34,35; Acts 12:1-3; 1 Thessalonians 2:15; Revelation 11:7
and cast
22:19; 36:30
common people
Heb. sons of the people.

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:23". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-26.html.

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