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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 26:24

 

 

But the hand of Ahikam the son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah, so that he was not given into the hands of the people to put him to death.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The hand of Ahikam - was with Jeremiah - And it was probably by his influence that Jeremiah did not share the same fate with Urijah. The Ahikam mentioned here was probably the father of Gedaliah, who, after the capture of Jerusalem, was appointed governor of the country by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 40:5. Of the Prophet Urijah, whether he was true or false, we know nothing but what we learn from this place.

That they should not give him into the hand of the people - Though acquitted in the supreme court, he was not out of danger; there was a popular prejudice against him, and it is likely that Ahikam was obliged to conceal him, that they might not put him to death. The genuine ministers of God have no favor to expect from those who are His enemies.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-26.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Ahikam - See the marginal reference. His son Gemariah lent Jeremiah his room for the public reading of Jehoiakim‘s scroll, and another son Gedaliah was made governor of the land by the Chaldaeans Jeremiah 39:14; the family probably shared the political views of Jeremiah.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-26.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"But the hand of Ahikam the son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah, that they should not give him into the hand of the people to put him to death."

This powerful citizen protected Jeremiah and refused to turn him over to the king and his followers, knowing full well what the results would have been if he had done so. He was indeed a powerful man in that period of Jewish history. His son Gedaliah later become governor of Judah; and "He is mentioned again in circumstances that reflect great credit upon him and his religion in 2 Kings 22:12-14."[15] What a wonderful service he provided here for the true faith by his faithful protection of the true prophet Jeremiah!


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/jeremiah-26.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Nevertheless, the hand of Ahikam the son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah,.... Though this instance was urged as a precedent to go by, being lately done; or though the king's cruelty had been so lately exercised in such a manner; yet this man, who had been one of Josiah's courtiers and counsellors, 2 Kings 22:12; stood by Jeremiah, and used all his power, authority, and influence, in his favour:

that they should not give him into the hand of the people, to put him to death; that the sanhedrim should not; who, by the last precedent mentioned, might seem inclined to it; but this great man, having several brothers, as well as other friends, that paid a regard to his arguments and solicitations; he prevailed upon them not to give leave to the people to put him to death, who appear to have been very fickle and mutable; at first they joined with the priests and false prophets against Jeremiah, to accuse him; but upon the judgment and vote of the princes, on hearing the cause, they changed their sentiments, and were for the prophet against the priests; and now, very probably, upon the instance of Urijah being given as a precedent, they altered their minds again, and were for putting him to death, could they have obtained leave of the court; and which only Ahikam's interest prevented.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-26.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Nevertheless the hand of Ahikam n the son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah, that they should not give him into the hand of the people to put him to death.

(n) Which declares that nothing could have appeased their fury if God had not moved this noble man to stand valiantly in his defense.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-26.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Ahikam — son of Shaphan the scribe, or royal secretary. He was one of those whom King Josiah, when struck by the words of the book of the law, sent to inquire of the Lord (2 Kings 22:12, 2 Kings 22:14). Hence his interference here in behalf of Jeremiah is what we should expect from his past association with that good king. His son, Gedaliah, followed in his father‘s steps, so that he was chosen by the Babylonians as the one to whom they committed Jeremiah for safety after taking Jerusalem, and on whose loyalty they could depend in setting him over the remnant of the people in Judea (Jeremiah 39:14; 2 Kings 25:22).

people to put him to death — Princes often, when they want to destroy a good man, prefer it to be done by a popular tumult rather than by their own order, so as to reap the fruit of the crime without odium to themselves (Matthew 27:20).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

The narrative closes with a remark as to how, amid such hostility against the prophets of God on the part of king and people, Jeremiah escaped death. This was because the hand of Ahikam the son of Shaphan was with him. This person is named in 2 Kings 22:12, 2 Kings 22:14, as one of the great men sent by King Josiah to the prophetess Hulda to inquire of her concerning the book of the law recently discovered. According to Jeremiah 39:14; Jeremiah 40:5, etc., he was the father of the future Chaldean governor Gedaliah.


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Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/jeremiah-26.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Nevertheless the hand of Ahikam the son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah, that they should not give him into the hand of the people to put him to death.

Nevertheless — Tho' Jeremiah's enemies pleaded this instance of Urijah, a case judged in this very king's reign; yet the hand, that is, the power and interest of Ahikam, one of Josiah's counsellors, and the father of Gedaliah, was with Jeremiah.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-26.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

There is here an adversative particle, and not without reason; for the contention is pointed out which had so raged that it became difficult to extricate the holy Prophet from danger. We hence conclude that Jeremiah was in so much peril that it was with great and arduous effort that Ahikam saved him. There is a frequent mention of this man in sacred history, and his name will hereafter be found in several places, and he was left to govern the remnant of the people after the demolition of the city. (2 Kings 25:22; Jeremiah 39:14.) (176) And there is no doubt but that he made progress in religion and was an upright man, and that his virtues were so valued by Nebuchadnezzar that he bestowed on him such an honor. He was soon afterwards slain by the ungodly and the wicked; but there is nothing related of him but what is honorable to him. It was indeed an extraordinary act of courage that he dared to oppose the fury of the whole people, and to check the priests and the false prophets who had conspired to put the holy man to death.

This is the reason why it is in the last place added, that the hand of Ahikam was with Jeremiah; though the people were furious, and the priests would by no means be restrained from persecuting the holy man, yet Ahikam could not be turned from his holy purpose, but persevered to defend a good cause until Jeremiah escaped in safety. It is hence said, that his hand was with Jeremiah; for by hand in Scripture is meant effort, (conatus;) for where there is anything to be done, or any difficulty, the Scripture uses the word hand But as Ahikam exerted himself to the uttermost, not only in aiding the holy Prophet by his words, but also in repressing the fury of the people, and in boldly resisting the priests and the false prophets, the hand in this place means aid; his hand was with Jeremiah, that is, he aided or helped him, so that he was not delivered up into the hand of the people

It hence also appears, as we said yesterday, that the tumult of the people was not immediately allayed, for the false prophets and the priests had so roused their virulence that they became almost implacable. Here, then, is set before us an example of courage and perseverance; for it is not enough for us to defend a good cause when we may do so with safety, except we also disregard all ill-will and despise all dangers, and resist the fury of the wicked, and undergo contentions and dangers for God’s servants whenever necessary. We are also taught at the same time how much weight belongs to the influence of one man when he boldly defends a good cause and yields not to the madness of the wicked, but risks extremities rather than betray the truth of God and his ministers. Now follows, —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-26.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 26:24 Nevertheless the hand of Ahikam the son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah, that they should not give him into the hand of the people to put him to death.

Ver. 24. Nevertheless the hand of Ahikam.] Who had been one of Josiah’s counsellors. [2 Kings 22:12] By this man’s authority and help Jeremiah was delivered, and God rewarded him in his son Gedaliah, made governor of the land. [2 Kings 25:22]


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-26.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

YE ministers of the Lord Jesus! here learn from Jeremiah the blessedness of being found faithful. Solemnly enlisted under the banner of Christ, plead his cause, and fight his battle, with an ungodly world, whether men will hear, or whether they will forbear. And as the Lord hath said, fear ye not the reproaches of men, neither be ye afraid of their revilings: for the moth shall eat them up like a garment, and the worm shall eat them like wool: but your Lord's righteousness shall be forever, and his salvation from generation to generation.

And oh! thou Almighty Lord of thy servants! do thou stand by them, and help them; give them to see and know, that it is thy cause they plead, and that thou art engaged for their defense. Make them a sweet savour of thyself unto God and the Father; and though a gazing stock, and a proverb of derision to the world, do thou own and bless their labours to the conversion of sinners, and the comforting of saints; that when thou, the Great Shepherd of thy fold shall appear, they may rejoice before thee at thy coming, and receive a crown of glory, that fadeth not away.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/jeremiah-26.html. 1828.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 26:24. Ahikam Ahikam was an ancient prince of Judah, who bore a considerable employment under Josiah. Compare 2 Kings 22:12-14. Gedaliah was his son; see 2 Kings 25:22 who, as well as his father, had a great regard for Jeremiah. See ch. Jeremiah 39:14, Jeremiah 40:5.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, They who would be faithful to God in the discharge of their ministry, must set their faces like a flint, and be above the fear of man.

1. Jeremiah is sent into the courts of the Lord's house, where, on one of their solemn feasts, the people of the land were assembled out of the cities of Judah, and there, in the midst of that great congregation, he must deliver his message; and lest their greatness, their multitude, or their known enmity against such faithful warnings, might daunt his courage, or warp him to palliate the severity of the threatening, he is charged not to diminish a word. When we speak for God, we must neither be afraid nor ashamed to declare his whole counsel, and resolutely abide by the consequences.

2. The purport of his discourse is, to advise them of the danger of their sins, and the purpose of God to punish them; to exhort them to a speedy and unfeigned repentance; to assure them that then God would turn away his anger from them; but that if they persisted in their impenitence, disobedience to his holy law, and disregard of his divinely appointed ministers, the consequences would be inevitably fatal, and their ruin ensue; Jerusalem with the temple, like Shiloh and the tabernacle there pitched of old, would be given into the hands of her enemies, and her judgment be so terrible, that it should be the deepest imprecation to say, The Lord make thee like Jerusalem! Now nothing here could give reasonable offence. God graciously waited; he offered mercifully to receive them; they had only to return to him, and then the message breathed nothing but peace and pardon: but they, who resolved to persist in their iniquities, could not bear to be told of the issue of them. Note; (1.) There is nothing in the most terrible denunciations of wrath to quarrel with, especially when the gracious God previously condescends to make known to us these terrors, in order to lead us to pardon and everlasting peace. But, (2.) If men will not be warned, they must be damned.

2nd, The plainest and most reasonable admonitions, delivered with the tenderest affection, and urged with the most solemn weight of God's authority, have no effect upon the hardened sinner, but to exasperate his corruptions.

1. Jeremiah is arrested for his preaching, and dragged before the magistrates, that he may be condemned and executed. The ungodly priests and false prophets, who in all ages and places have been the bitterest enemies and persecutors of the pious, arose, exasperated at what they heard, and the people, at their instigation, readily followed them; they seize the poor prophet, and threaten him with immediate death, either in the rage of pretended zeal, or by form of law. The charge against him is for falsehood, and blasphemous words spoken against that holy place, because in the name of the Lord he had said, this house shall be like Shiloh, and this city shall be desolate without an inhabitant. Such an uproar raised a vast tumult, and all the people ran together; the tidings of which soon brought up the princes from the king's house into the temple, and before them, as judges, the criminal is produced, at the entry of the new gate of the Lord's house, where they sat to hear the cause. The false prophets and priests, whose hand was ever first in the transgression of opposing the ministers of truth, stand forth to accuse him, not doubting but to gain a verdict in their favour, appealing for the truth of their charge to all the people who had heard Jeremiah's discourse, and demanding judgment against him as most worthy to die. Note; They who will be zealous for God must sometimes put their lives in their hand. How often since this have the true preachers of Christ been in danger by tumultuous mobs, instigated by apostate priests!

2. Jeremiah vindicates himself from the charge, not by denying it, but by maintaining the truth of what he had spoken. The words were not his own. God had sent him, and how could he then be silent? Besides, the threatenings only affected the impenitent. So far therefore from desisting, he urges the admonition that he had given; Therefore now amend your ways and your doings, and obey the voice of the Lord your God, who yet did not disclaim the relation, and was ready instantly, on their repentance, to reverse the threatenings issued against them. What was urged with so kind an intention surely deserved not punishment, but praise. However, he submits to whatever sentence they thought fit to pronounce, but warns them of the danger of shedding the blood of an innocent man, which would cry for vengeance; and the still more atrocious guilt of slaying a prophet solely for delivering the words which of a truth the Lord had sent him to speak, who would not fail condignly to avenge such a flagrant insult upon himself, as well as such cruel injustice done to his servant. Note; (1.) To preach boldly, and suffer patiently for well-doing, is the true spirit of a Christian minister. (2.) We must abide by God's word, nor ever recede a step, though the greatest loss and damage, yea, though death itself, threaten us for our fidelity.

3rdly, God knoweth how to deliver his people out of temptation, and, when their case appears most desperate, to rescue them from the jaws of the lion.

1. Jeremiah is acquitted, notwithstanding the malicious accusations of his enemies. Such an evidence attended his defence, such a noble simplicity appeared in it, such approved fidelity, and God himself put such an awe upon the princes and people, that, though they strangely hardened their hearts against the admonition given, yet they own God's authority, and dare not condemn the innocent prophet. Note; There are many on whom the word of God hath so far an influence, as to extort their assent to its truth, who nevertheless continue unhumbled in their sins.

2. Some of the court, from among the princes, and perhaps with Ahikam at their head, rose up in the prophet's defence; and, as a precedent, quoted the case of Micah, who a little before, in the days of Hezekiah, had prophesied as severe things as ever Jeremiah had done; that Jerusalem should become heaps, the city plowed like a field, and the temple utterly demolished; yet so far were Hezekiah and his princes from condemning him to death for his fidelity, that they trembled at God's word, besought the Lord, repented of their evil deeds; and this was the lengthening of their prosperity, God accepting their repentance, and withholding the threatened judgments. And such conduct, they insinuate, in the present case, would be most fit and becoming; whereas to act otherwise, in shedding innocent blood at the instigation of exasperated priests, incensed at having their pride, hypocrisy, and falsehood detected, would procure great evil against their souls, lay them under heavy guilt, and expose them to God's awful vengeance. Note; (1.) The greatest men shew their wisdom in hearing and obeying the admonitions of God. (2.) The dreadful consequences of sin, if nothing else, should deter us from it; if we have little sense of its evil and malignity, the fear of hell at least should restrain us.

3. Another instance is quoted of a prophet put to death in the present reign, which some suppose to be a case in point urged by Jeremiah's persecutors in reply to the former, and in order to obtain his condemnation. Others, that it is the continuation of the same person's discourse, urging the guilt already brought upon the land by the murder of one prophet; and that to increase it, by a repetition of the like crime, could not but hasten their destruction. Others suppose that this anecdote was added by Jeremiah himself, or whoever collected his prophesies, as an instance of God's extraordinary interposition in the present case, when so lately, in the same reign, another holy man, Urijah, met his fate in the discharge of his office; and for the very same words which Jeremiah had spoken: provoked by his preaching, the king and his nobles sought to slay him; and, to avoid it, the prophet either prudently absconded, or rather timorously deserted his post; for men of real grace may at times be overcome with fear; though usually little is to be got by flight, as in the present case. Cowardice often exposes those to ruin whom courage might have extricated from danger. The king sent after him to Egypt, whither he had fled, got him delivered up as a state-criminal, and slew him, probably with his own hand, at least commanded it to be done; and, to make the ignominy the greater, and his prophesies the more disregarded, cast his dead body into the graves of the common people.

4. Notwithstanding all the pleas of his accusers, Ahikam, the son of Shaphan, 2 Kings 22:12 a man who had lived under pious Josiah, a great man, yet a good man, and the prophet's friend, stood by him, and prevailed upon the princes not to deliver him into the hands of the enraged people, whom the priests had inflamed, and were ready to murder him, as soon as they could obtain permission. Note; God hath in his hands the hearts of all men, and can raise us up friends in the day of trial, where we least expected to find them.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-26.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Though Jeremiah’s enemies pleaded this instance of Urijah, which had this advantage of the other, because it was matter of fact done lately, and a case judged in this very king’s reign; yet the hand, that is, the power and interest, of one

Ahikam, who, as appears from 2 Kings 22:12, was one of Josiah’s counsellors, and the father of Gedaliah, Jeremiah 39:14, who upon the taking of the city was made governor, Jeremiah 40:5,

was with Jeremiah. So as, through the good providence of God, Jeremiah was not delivered into the hands of the people, some of whom were mutable, and malicious enough, ready to do any thing the priests put them upon. And the after-advancement of the son of this Ahikam to be governor of Judah may justly be interpreted a reward in this life, which God gave him for his kindness to his prophet.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-26.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

24. Hand of Ahikam — The implication of this verse would seem to be, that had not Jeremiah been especially protected by a man of influence and power he would have shared a similar fate with Urijah.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-26.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

However, Ahikam exercised his influence and Jeremiah escaped death. Ahikam and his family came to Jeremiah"s aid more than once (cf. Jeremiah 36:10; Jeremiah 36:25; Jeremiah 39:14; Jeremiah 40:5-16; 2 Kings 22:3-14; 2 Kings 25:22).

The priests of Jerusalem later brought Jesus Christ and the apostles to trial and charged them with preaching the destruction of the temple (cf. Matthew 24:2; Matthew 26:57-68; Mark 14:58; Acts 6:12-14; Acts 21:28-36).


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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-26.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Jeremiah 26:24. Nevertheless, the hand of Ahikam, &c., was with Jeremiah — Both he and his father Shaphan were chief ministers under Josiah, 2 Kings 22:12-14. And the brothers of Ahikam, Gemariah, Elasah, and Jaazaniah were considerable men in those days, with Ahikam, and members of the great council; Jeremiah 29:3; Ezekiel 8:11. So Ahikam made use of his interest with them to deliver Jeremiah from the danger that threatened him. Thus God wonderfully preserved Jeremiah, though he did not flee as Urijah did, but stood his ground. Ordinary ministers may use ordinary means, provided they be lawful ones, for their preservation; but they that have an extraordinary mission may expect an extraordinary protection.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/jeremiah-26.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Ahicam. A man employed under Josias, (4 Kings xxii. 12.) and father of Godolias, who was also the protector of Jeremias, chap. xxxix. 14., and 4 Kings xxv. 22. (Calmet)

 


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-26.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Ahikam. The father of Gedaliah, who, when appointed governor by Nebuchadnezzar, stood as the friend of Jeremiah. For a son of Ahikam also befriending Jeremiah, See Jeremiah 40:6.

Shaphan. See note on 2 Kings 22:3. See Jeremiah 36:10 for another son; Jeremiah 29:3 for another son. Also befriending Jeremiah.


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-26.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Nevertheless the hand of Ahikam the son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah, that they should not give him into the hand of the people to put him to death.

Ahikam - son of Shaphan the scribe, or royal secretary. He was one of those whom King Josiah, when struck by the words of the book of the law, sent to inquire of the Lord (2 Kings 22:12; 2 Kings 22:14). Hence, his interference here in behalf of Jeremiah is what we should expect from his past association with that good king. His son Gedaliah followed in his father's steps, so that he was chosen by the Babylonians as the one to whom they committed Jeremiah for safety after taking Jerusalem, and on whose loyalty they could depend in setting him over the remnant of the people in Judea (Jeremiah 39:14; 2 Kings 25:22).

That they should not give him into the hand of the people to put him to death. Princes often, when they want to destroy a good man, prefer it to be done by a popular tumult, rather than by their own order, so as to reap the fruit of the crime without odium to themselves (Matthew 27:20).

Remarks:

(1) The minister of God must speak unreservedly and faithfully all that God commands him to speak; he must "not diminish a word" (Jeremiah 26:2) through fear or flattery, but, like Paul, be able to say at the end of his ministry, "I have not shunned to declare unto you all the counsel of God" (Acts 20:27). Jeremiah's warrant for his boldness in announcing the doom of the tabernacle at Shiloh (Jeremiah 26:9), as about to befall the temple at Jerusalem, was simply (Jeremiah 26:12), "The Lord sent me to prophesy against this house." So long as the minister of God delivers faithfully the message of his Divine Master, there is no just ground for complaint against him, and he may confidently leave results with God.

(2) The threat of putting him to death (Jeremiah 26:8) only made Jeremiah repeat his message from God with the same affectionate earnestness as before, "Amend your ways, and obey the voice of the Lord your God, and the Lord will repent Him of the evil that He hath pronounced against you" (Jeremiah 26:13). Neither their threats could abate the loving tenderness of his appeal, nor his own natural timidity diminish from his faithful statement of the message of God: he suppresses nothing and softens nothing from fear of man. At the same time, without resistance, he gives himself up to the pleasure of the powers that be, as ordained of God (Romans 13:1); but at the same time warns them of the fatal consequences which will result to themselves if, by an unrighteous judgment, they condemn him to death, and so shed innocent blood (Jeremiah 26:15). Herein we have a model for the guidance of ministers under similar circumstances. God will either save them from suffering, or save them in suffering, for His name's sake, "Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God commit the keeping of their souls to Him in well-doing, as unto a faithful Creator" (1 Peter 4:19).

(3) God has all hearts in His hands, and can raise up friends and advocates for His people from among the ranks of their opponents. When Jeremiah's life was threatened by the priests, the prophets, and all the people, certain of the elders were moved by God to stand up in his behalf (Jeremiah 26:17). A Gamaliel was raised up to befriend Peter and John in the Jewish Council (Acts 5:34, etc.), even as Nicodemus had claimed even-handed justice and an impartial hearing for their Master before them (John 7:50-51).

(4) The elders pleaded for Jeremiah the parallel cases of Micah and Urijah, who had both prophesied against Jerusalem-the former, under the good King Hezekiah, so far from forfeiting his life by his faithfulness, was the instrument of leading the king to repentance and humiliation before the Lord, so that the Lord repented of the evil which he had threatened; though the latter paid the penalty of his godly boldness with his life, yet the consequences to Jehoiakim were such as to afford but little encouragement to him and his people to repeat such a daring defiance of God again. Jeremiah was therefore spared. Whence we may learn that, if the Lord be on our side, we need not fear what man can do to us. Ungodly men cannot stir one step against us further than God permits. Their hands are tied in regard to the children of God, except so far as God allows, and God will not allow any real or lasting evil to befall His people. Happy therefore are the people that have God for their God!


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-26.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) Nevertheless the hand of Ahikam . . .—The family to whom the prophet’s protector belonged played a conspicuous part in the history of this period, and may be said to have furnished examples of three generations of Jewish patriotism. Shaphan, the father, was prominent as a scribe in the reformation of Josiah (cir. A.D. 624). He superintended the restoration of the Temple (2 Chronicles 34:8). To him Hilkiah the priest gave the book of the Law which had been found in the house of the Lord, and Shaphan took it to the king. He took his son Ahikam with him when he was sent to consult the prophetess Huldah (2 Kings 22:12; 2 Chronicles 34:20). Here the son meets us, true to the early lessons of his life, as the protector of the prophet, whose work rested so largely on the impression made by the Book of the Law thus discovered. A brother of Ahikam, Gemariah, appears in a like character in Jeremiah 36:12; Jeremiah 36:25. After the conquest of the land by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah finds refuge with Gedaliah, the son of Ahikam (Jeremiah 40:6), who had been made, apparently through the prophet’s influence, satrap, or governor, of the lands under the Chaldæan king; and he, after a fruitless warning, falls a victim to the conspiracy of the princes of the royal house (Jeremiah 41:1-2). Here stress is laid on the fact of Ahikam’s protection, as showing how it was that Jeremiah escaped the fate which fell on Urijah.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-26.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Nevertheless the hand of Ahikam the son of Shaphan was with Jeremiah, that they should not give him into the hand of the people to put him to death.
Ahikam
39:14; 40:5-7; 2 Kings 22:12-14; 25:22; 2 Chronicles 34:20
that
1:18,19; 15:15-21; 1 Kings 18:4; Isaiah 37:32,33; Acts 23:10,20-35; Acts 25:3,4; 27:43; Revelation 12:16

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 26:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-26.html.

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