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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 27:6

 

 

"Now I have given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, My servant, and I have given him also the wild animals of the field to serve him.

Adam Clarke Commentary

And now have I given - These kingdoms are at my sovereign disposal; and at present, for the punishment of their rulers and people, I shall give them into the hands of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-27.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And now I have given all these lands,.... Before mentioned; of Edom, Moab, Ammon, Tyre, Zidon, and Judea:

into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my servant; whom God used as an instrument in correcting and chastising the nations; and who obeyed his will, though he knew it not; nor did what he did in obedience to it; and yet had the honour of being called his servant, and of being rewarded with a very large empire; which was owing, not so much to his prowess and valour, wisdom and management, as to the providence of God; who delivered the above kingdoms, with others, into his hands, as being the sole proprietor and sovereign disposer of them:

and the beasts of the field have I given him also to serve him; either to bring him, and his armies, and his carriages of provisions for them, and warlike stores, for the invasion and taking the above countries; or the cattle found there, which belonged to these countries, and the inhabitants thereof, which would fall into his hands with them.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-27.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And now have I given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my c servant; and the beasts of the field have I given him also to serve him.

(c) Read (Jeremiah 25:9).

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-27.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

beasts of the field — not merely the horses to carry his Chaldean soldiers, and oxen to draw his provisions [Grotius]; not merely the deserts, mountains, and woods, the haunts of wild beasts, implying his unlimited extent of empire [Estius]; but the beasts themselves by a mysterious instinct of nature. A reproof to men that they did not recognize God‘s will, which the very beasts acknowledged (compare Isaiah 1:3). As the beasts are to submit to Christ, the Restorer of the dominion over nature, lost by the first Adam (compare Genesis 1:28; Genesis 2:19, Genesis 2:20; Psalm 8:6-8), so they were appointed to submit to Nebuchadnezzar, the representative of the world power and prefigurer of Antichrist; this universal power was suffered to be held by him to show the unfitness of any to wield it “until He come whose right it is” (Ezekiel 21:27).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-27.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

God, after having claimed to himself the government of the whole earth, and shewn that it is in his power to transfer kingdoms to whom he pleases, now declares his decree — that he would subject to the king of Babylon all the neighboring lands, even Tyrus and Sidon, the country of Moab, the country of Ammon, the country of Edom, and even Judea itself. If Jeremiah had begun by saying, that God had given to King Nebuchadnezzar these lands, the prediction would not have been so easily received, for pride would have been as it were an obstacle to bolt up their minds and hearts. But the preface, as it has been stated, served to shew that they were not to think that they could stand against the will of God. After having then brought down the great height which seemed fixed in their hearts, he now declares that King Nebuchadnezzar would be the lord over Judah as well as over all the countries around, for God had set him over these lands.

He extends also this subjection, of which he speaks, over the very beasts, and not without reason; for he thus indirectly condemns the hardness of men, if they resisted, as though he had said, “What will it avail you to attempt with refractory hearts to shake off the yoke? for the very beasts, tigers, wolves, lions, and every fierce and savage animal in the land, even all these beasts shall know that the King Nebuchadnezzar is their master, even by a hidden instinct. Since, then, these beasts shall obey King Nebuchadnezzar, because he has been raised by God to that dignity, how great must be the stupidity of men in not acknowledging what the very beasts understand?” We hence see the design of mentioning the beasts; the Prophet upbraided men with their madness, if they ferociously resisted the King Nebuchadnezzar; for in that, case the beasts of the field were endued with more intelligence than they. For whence is it that beasts have fear, except that God has imprinted certain marks of dignity on kings, according to what is said by Daniel. (Daniel 2:38.) As, then, the majesty of God appears in kings, the very beasts, though void of reason and judgment, yet willingly obey through a hidden impulse of nature. Hence inexcusable is the pride of men, if at least they do not imitate the example of the very beasts. (180)

Nebuchadnezzar is afterwards called the servant of God, not that he was worthy of such an honor, as it had never been his purpose to labor for God; but he was called a servant, because God designed to employ him in his service, as those are called in the Psalm the sons of God, to whom the word of God was addressed, that is, to whom he gave authority to rule. (Psalms 82:6; John 10:35.) So also Nebuchadnezzar was God’s servant, because he was divinely endued with sovereign power. This he did not know, nor was this said for his sake, nor was he honored with such a name, as though God regarded him as one of his own people; but this had a reference to the Jews and to all the other nations, in order that they might be fully persuaded that they were obeying God in humbling themselves and in undertaking the yoke of the king of Babylon, for this pleased God. There is no power, says Paul, but from God, (Romans 13:1,) and that sentence is derived from this principle, that all power is from God; for he gives the power to rule and to govern to whom he pleases. Whosoever, then, are endued with the power of the sword and public authority, are God’s servants, though they exercise tyranny and be robbers. They are servants, not with respect to themselves, but because God would have them to be acknowledged as his ministers until their time shall come, according to what follows —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-27.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 27:6 And now have I given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my servant; and the beasts of the field have I given him also to serve him.

Ver. 6. And now have I given all these lands.] Nebuchadnezzar shall be monarch contra Gentes. Dicunt nugatores equitasse Nabuchodonosor super leonem, et infraenasse draconem. (a)


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-27.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

By the former words God gave the prophet authority to assert his dominion, and right to dispose of all creatures; by these he authorizeth him to reveal his will, concerning the disposal of the lands of Edom, Moab, Ammon, Tyre, and Zidon, viz. that he had disposed of them to

Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, whom he calleth his servant, because he did the work which he would have him to do; though, as God said of the Assyrian, Isaiah 10:7, he meaned not so, he had nothing less in his thoughts than to obey any command of God; wicked men being God’s servants, as the hawk is the prudent falconer’s servant, who maketh use of the ravenous quality of the hawk to get game for him. Twice more at least we find Nebuchadnezzar thus called, Jeremiah 25:9 43:10. God further adds that

the beasts should serve him, by which he either means that the cattle which were in the possession of the men of those nations should also come into his power; or that God had also given the horses, and oxen, and other beasts which he should use in his wars for carriages, or conveniency to him, so as they should be really serviceable to him in his conquests of those countries.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-27.html. 1685.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Jeremiah 27:6. I have given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar — “God is the sole lord and proprietor of the world; and, by virtue of his absolute sovereignty and dominion, has a right to give the kingdoms of the earth to whomsoever he pleases, Daniel 4:17, and he exercises this authority by changing times and seasons, by removing kings, and setting up kings, Daniel 2:21. The king of Babylon, my servant — One whom I have made use of as an instrument to execute my purposes in inflicting punishment on many nations: see note on Jeremiah 25:9. And the beasts of the field have I given him — This is a hyperbolical way of speaking, to signify the most ample authority and dominion.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/jeremiah-27.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Beasts. The property of those people, or the most barbarous nations. (St. Jerome) --- Hangmen and executioners may in the same sense be styled God's servants. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-27.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Nebuchadnezzar. Some codices spell it "Nebuchadrezzar".

My servant. Compare Jeremiah 25:9. See Daniel 2:37, Daniel 2:38.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-27.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And now have I given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my servant; and the beasts of the field have I given him also to serve him.

Now have I given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar - not for his merits, but of my own sole good pleasure (Estius).

Beasts of the field - not merely the horses to carry his Chaldean soldiers and oxen to draw his provisions Beasts of the field - not merely the horses to carry his Chaldean soldiers, and oxen to draw his provisions (Grotius); not merely the deserts, mountains, and woods, the haunts of wild beasts, implying his unlimited extent of empire (Estius); but the beasts themselves, by a mysterious instinct of nature. A reproof to men that they did not recognize God's will, which the very beasts acknowledged (cf. Isaiah 1:3). As the beasts are to submit to Christ, the Restorer of the dominion over nature, lost by the first Adam (cf. Genesis 1:28; Genesis 2:19-20; Psalms 8:6-8), so they were appointed to submit to Nebuchadnezzar, the representative of the world-power delegated to him by God, which, however, when he abused, ruling for himself instead of for and under God, he became the prefigurer of Antichrist; this universal power was suffered to be held by him to show the unfitness of any to wield it, "until He come whose right it is" (Ezekiel 21:27).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-27.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) Nebuchadnezzar . . . my servant.—See Note on Jeremiah 25:9 for the title thus given. The special stress laid on “the beasts of the field” is, perhaps, connected with the resistance of the nations to the levies made by the Babylonian officers upon their horses and cattle, or their claim to use the land they had subdued, after the manner which we see depicted on Assyrian sculptures, as a hunting-ground. Compare especially the account of Tiglath-Pileser I.’s hunting expedition in Records of the Past, xi., p. 9.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-27.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And now have I given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my servant; and the beasts of the field have I given him also to serve him.
I given all
28:14; Daniel 2:37,38; 5:18,19
my
24:1; 25:9; 43:10; 51:20-23; Isaiah 44:28; Ezekiel 29:18-20
and
28:14; Psalms 50:10-12; Daniel 2:38

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 27:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-27.html.

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