corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 36:12

 

 

he went down to the king's house, into the scribe's chamber. And behold, all the officials were sitting there--Elishama the scribe, and Delaiah the son of Shemaiah, and Elnathan the son of Achbor, and Gemariah the son of Shaphan, and Zedekiah the son of Hananiah, and all the other officials.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The scribe‘s chamber - The chancery in which the king‘s business was conducted. Probably Elishama was one of the “principal scribes of the host” Jeremiah 52:25, i. e., the secretary of state for war. The business which had brought together “all the princes” would have reference to the Chaldaean war.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-36.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then he went down into the king's house,.... The royal palace, which was not upon the mountain on which the temple stood, but lay lower, and therefore Micaiah is said to go down to it; with what design he went thither is not certain, whether out of ill will to Jeremiah and Baruch, or out of good will, being affected with what he had heard, and desirous that some steps might be taken by the government to prevent the calamities coming upon them, according to these prophecies; which latter seems most probable, since no charge or accusation is brought by him; and since his father, with others, to whom he gave the account afterwards, interceded with the king that the roll might not be burnt, Jeremiah 36:25; however, immediately after he had heard the roll read, he went to the king's house:

into the scribe's chamber; the secretary's office; formerly his grandfather Shaphan's, now Elishama's:

and, lo, all the princes sat there; some of them are mentioned by name:

even Elishama the scribe; or secretary; the prime minister, the principal secretary of state, and therefore named first, in whose chamber or office they were:

and Delaiah the son of Shemaiah; who this person was, or his office, is not known; he is nowhere else made mention of; and who his father was is not certain:

and Elnathan the son of Achbor; the same that Jehoiakim sent to Egypt to fetch Uriah from thence, Jeremiah 26:22;

and Gemariah the son of Shaphan: who was Micaiah's father, and in whose chamber Baruch read the roll:

and Zedekiah the son of Hananiah; of this prince also no account is given elsewhere:

and all the princes; the rest of them, who were either members of the great sanhedrim, or courtiers; it appears from hence that this court was very profane and irreligious; for though they had proclaimed a fast, to make a show of religion, or at the importunity of the people; yet they did not attend temple worship and service themselves, but were all together in the secretary's office, very probably about political affairs.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-36.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

scribe‘s chamber — an apartment in the palace occupied by the secretary of state.

princes — holding a counsel of state at the time.

Elnathan — who had already been an instrument of evil in Jehoiakim‘s hand (Jeremiah 26:22, Jeremiah 26:23).

Hananiah — the false prophet (Jeremiah 28:10-17).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-36.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

It is not known with what design this Michaiah came to the princes and the king’s counsellors, he may have been an informer, who intended to create ill-will to the Prophet, and to ingratiate himself with the princes, as courtiers usually do. If this was the case, we may learn from this example, that not all who hear are so teachable and ready to obey as to make proficiency in the knowledge of good and holy doctrine: we see that many patiently hear and give some evidence of docility, and yet cherish perverseness in their hearts, and afterwards calumniate what they have heard. Such may have been the character of Michaiah, spoken of here. But his case may have been different, — that being filled with wonder, he conveyed to the king’s counsellors what he deemed new and, as it were, incredible. I leave this without offering an opinion, for we have nothing certain on the subject.

It is said that he came into the king’s palace, where all the princes sat, and into the chamber of the scribe It is probable that this scribe was the king’s chancellor, with whom were all the princes of the court. Some he names, and then says, that they were all there, and that Michaiah read to them the words which he had heard from the mouth of Baruch when he read to the whole people.

Now it was not without the wonderful purpose of God that the king at length came to know what had passed in the Temple, in order that his perverseness against God might be detected, as we shall hereafter see. This messenger, indeed, was the means of bringing danger to Jeremiah as well as to his servant Baruch; but the Lord protected them. However, the impiety and the obstinacy of the king were discovered; for when they were all terrified, he despised God and became enraged against his Prophet. He burnt the book, and wished also to destroy its author. It now follows, —


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-36.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 36:12 Then he went down into the king’s house, into the scribe’s chamber: and, lo, all the princes sat there, [even] Elishama the scribe, and Delaiah the son of Shemaiah, and Elnathan the son of Achbor, and Gemariah the son of Shaphan, and Zedekiah the son of Hananiah, and all the princes.

Ver. 12. Then he went down into the king’s house.] For there was his father and the rest of the princes, suam aulam vel gulam confectantes, following their court delights, while the people were now humbling themselves before the Lord, and trembling at his Word. Great men are, many of them, of that Earl of Westmoreland’s mind, who profanely said, I need not pray to God, since having tenants enough to pray for me.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-36.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

It is uncertain whether this Michaiah went to make this relation to the princes who sat in the secretary’s chamber, as a piece of news only, or out of a malicious design to accuse the prophet and Baruch for what was done as a seditious practice.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-36.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

12. The scribe’s chamber — A public office where the king’s decrees were formulated and recorded; as has properly been suggested, the office of the secretary of state. The presence of all the princes may indicate the critical condition of public affairs.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-36.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

went down. Compare Jeremiah 22:1.

Elnathan. The king"s emissary against Urijah (Jeremiah 26:22).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-36.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then he went down into the king's house, into the scribe's chamber: and, lo, all the princes sat there, even Elishama the scribe, and Delaiah the son of Shemaiah, and Elnathan the son of Achbor, and Gemariah the son of Shaphan, and Zedekiah the son of Hananiah, and all the princes.

The scribe's chamber - an apartment in the palace occupied by the secretary of state.

The princes - holding a council of state at the time.

Elnathan - who had already been an instrument of evil in Jehoiakim's hand (Jeremiah 26:22-23), to fetch the prophet Urijah out of Egypt, in order that Jehoiakim might kill him.

Hananiah - the false prophet (Jeremiah 28:10-17) visited with death, according to Jeremiah's denunciation from the Lord, in the reign of Zedekiah. Zedekiah the son of Hananiah does not seem to have been much better than his father.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-36.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(12) And, lo, all the princes sat there.—The following particulars may be noted as to the princes thus named. Elishama may have been identical with the prince of that name in 2 Kings 25:25, and, if so, was the grandfather of a man who afterwards plays a conspicuous part in the history of the prophet’s life (Jeremiah 41) He appears to have taken a purely official line, as scribe, standing neutral between the prophet and his opponents. Delaiah (the name signifies “the Lord delivers,” and is found as that of a priest in the time of David, 1 Chronicles 24:18) joins Elnathan and Gemariah in pleading against the king’s destruction of the prophetic roll. The name Shemaiah, which appears here as that of his father, is found in Nehemiah 6:10 as belonging to a son of Delaiah, and this probably indicates relationship. On Elnathan, the son of Achbor, see Note on Jeremiah 26:22. On Gemariah, see Note on Jeremiah 36:10. Of Zedekiah nothing more is known, unless his father Hananiah be the prophet who opposes Jeremiah in Jeremiah 28:1-17.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-36.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then he went down into the king's house, into the scribe's chamber: and, lo, all the princes sat there, even Elishama the scribe, and Delaiah the son of Shemaiah, and Elnathan the son of Achbor, and Gemariah the son of Shaphan, and Zedekiah the son of Hananiah, and all the princes.
Elishama
20,21; 41:1
Elnathan
25; 26:22; 2 Kings 22:12,14; 24:8
Gemariah
10,11; 2 Kings 22:3,12
Hananiah
28:1-17

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-36.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology