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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 36:23

 

 

When Jehudi had read three or four columns, the king cut it with a scribe's knife and threw it into the fire that was in the brazier, until all the scroll was consumed in the fire that was in the brazier.

Adam Clarke Commentary

When Jehudi had read three or four leaves - Rather columns; for the law, and the sacred Hebrew Books, are written in columns of a certain breadth. דלתות delathoth, signifies gates or openings between column and column, or between section and section.

He cut it with the penknife - הספר בתער bethaar hassopher, "the knife of the scribe," properly enough penknife.

And cast it into the fire - To show his contempt for God's words.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-36.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Leaves - Columns: literally folding-doors; the word exactly describes the shape of the columns of writing upon the scroll.

Penknife - “Scribe‘s knife;” used to shape the reed for writing, and to make erasures in the parchment.

On the hearth - Or, in the fire-pan. The conduct of the king shows how violent was his temper.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-36.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And it came to pass, that when Jehudi had read three or four leaves,.... Either three or four of the breadths of parchment, which were glued together, and rolled up; or three or four of the columns in those breadths. The meaning is, he had read a few of them. The RabbinsF19T. Hieros. Moed Katon, fol. 83. 2. would have it, that three or four verses in the book of the Lamentations are meant:

he cut it with the penknife; that is, he cut the roll to pieces with a penknife he had in his hand, or lay near him. It is difficult to say who it was that did this; whether Jehudi that read the roll, or Jehoiakim the king that heard it; most interpreters understand it of the latter; but the connection of the words carries it to the former; for the nearest antecedent to the relative he is Jehudi; though it is highly probable he did it at the king's command; or, however, saw by his countenance and behaviour that such an action would be grateful to him; and that he was highly displeased with what had been read, and could not hear any longer with patience:

and cast it into the fire that was on the hearth, until all the roll was consumed in the fire that was on the hearth; that is, he cast it into the fire, and there let it lie, until it was wholly consumed; a very impious action, to burn the word of God; a full evidence of an ungodly mind; a clear proof of the enmity of the heart against God, and of its indignation against his word and servants; and yet a vain attempt to frustrate the divine predictions in it, or avert the judgments threatened; but the ready way to bring them on.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-36.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

three or four leaves — not distinct leaves as in a book, but the consecutive spaces on the long roll in the shape of doors (whence the Hebrew name is derived), into which the writing is divided: as the books of Moses in the synagogue in the present day are written in a long parchment rolled round a stick, the writing divided into columns, like pages.

pen-knife — the writer‘s knife with which the reed, used as a pen, was mended. “He” refers to the king (Jeremiah 36:22). As often as Jehudi read three or four columns, the king cut asunder the part of the roll read; and so he treated the whole, until all the parts read consecutively were cut and burnt; Jeremiah 36:24, “all these words,” implies that the whole volume was read through, not merely the first three or four columns (1 Kings 22:8).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-36.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And it came to pass, that when Jehudi had read three or four leaves, he cut it with the penknife, and cast it into the fire that was on the hearth, until all the roll was consumed in the fire that was on the hearth.

He — The king not having patience to hear above three or four columns, or periods, cut it in pieces and burned it in the fire.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-36.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Here Jeremiah shews how little he had effected; for the king not only cast aside but tore the roll into pieces, and after having torn it, he wished its memory to perish, for he cast it into the fire. This trial must have grievously affected the mind of the Prophet; he had dictated that roll by God’s command; he saw now that all his labor had been in vain. He might then have complained to God that so much labor had been spent without fruit. For why had God bidden the roll to be written, except for the purpose of leading the king and his counsellors to repentance. As to the people, the Prophet could not know whether it had answered the end for which he sent his scribe Baruch to them, for no account is given as to the attention paid by them. But Baruch was led to the king’s palace, so the minds of all were kept in suspense: what was now the issue? The king burnt the roll. There is no doubt then but that the mind of the Prophet was much affected. But God thus exercises his servants when he bids them to speak to the deaf or to bring light to the blind.

Let us then learn simply to obey God, though the labor he requires from us may seem to be useless. And hence Paul rises above all the ingratitude of the world and says, that the ministers of the Gospel are a sweet odor to God, whether for death or for life, (2 Corinthians 2:15) for though the greater part are rendered worse by hearing the Gospel, yet the obedience rendered to God by ministers is acceptable to him, nor is the event to be looked to. Jeremiah then saw that the king’s mind was exasperated, but he did not on that account repent of his obedience, for he knew that the event was to be left with God and to his will. The duty of men is to execute whatever God commands, though no fruit may appear to proceed from their labors. This then is one thing.

Now as to the king, we see in him as in a glass how monstrous is their blindness who are the slaves of Satan. Surely the king, when God so thundered in his ears, ought to have been terrified. He could not indeed treat the word with ridicule, but he became enraged, and acted violently like a rabid wild beast, and vented his rage against the roll itself! If he thought Jeremiah to have been the author, why did he not disregard him as a man of no authority in public affairs? for Jeremiah could not have lessened his character as a king. There is then no doubt but that he perceived, though unwillingly, that he had to do with God; why then did he become thus enraged? what could he hope to gain by such madness towards God? But this, as I have said, was that dreadful blindness which is found in all the reprobate, whose minds the devil has fascinated; for on the one hand they perceive, willing or unwilling, that God is present, and that they are in a manner summoned to his tribunal; and on the other, as though they were forgetful of God, they rage madly against him.

It is then said of King Jehoiakim, that while he was in his winter-house and sitting before the fire, (106) when three or four pages had been read, he cut the roll with an iron pen, or with the small knife of a scribe. The word תער tor, means often a razor, but is to be taken here for the knife used by scribes, un canivet. The king, in the first place, did not wait until Jehudi finished the roll; after he had heard three or four leaves, or pages, as we call them, he seized the roll and cut it; and in the second place, being not content with this sacrilege he burnt the roll, as though he could abolish God’s judgment together with the book. But we shall hereafter see what he gained by this intemperate spirit in burning the roll until the whole was consumed in the fire It now follows —

And the king was sitting in the winter-house, in the ninth month, and at the brasier burning (or, which was burning) before him.

It is “a small altar, arula,” in the Vulg.; “fire” in the Syr. and Targ.; but “hearth” in the Sept. Ed.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-36.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE INDESTRUCTIBLE BOOK

‘All the roll was consumed.’

Jeremiah 36:23

We often think the books of the prophets very dry reading; if we studied them more we should find in them incidents and scenes as interesting and suggestive as this. One point only I remind you of now.

I. This is the first instance of burning the sacred Book.—Begin by picture of the scene, Jeremiah’s book read by the officers, and making quite an excitement among them. Observe what the book contains, prophecies of national woe because of national sins. At last they feel that it must be read to the king. At first they tell him of the contents of the roll, evidently afraid to show the roll itself to him. He angrily orders it to be fetched; they dare not disobey. The king listens to a few lines, then passionately snatches it out of the hands of Jehudi, and begins to cut it up into strips with his knife. Three of the councillors are brave enough to plead with him not to burn the roll; he will not heed them, utterly refusing to receive the Divine truth and message; putting insult on God by his treatment of His Word, the king goes on cutting up the roll, and dropping piece after piece into the flames, until the whole is burnt up. And to the evident surprise of the writer it is added, ‘Yet they were not afraid, nor rent their garments, neither the king nor any of his servants.’ The sacred Word has been destroyed or burnt many a time since then. Illustrate by Diocletian, finding it impossible by persecutions to root out all the Christians and destroy Christianity, endeavouring to get possession of all the Christian books; many suffered death for refusing to give them up. Antiochus attempted to destroy the Jewish scriptures. Illustrations also found in martyr ages.

II. Reasons for burning the Book.—Jehoiakim’s reason. (1) It testifies against men’s wrongdoing, and points out their danger. Describe how anxious the wreckers who wanted to plunder shipwrecked vessels would be to get the light in the lighthouse put out. (2) It sets men free—from superstition, from error, from bonds, from priests. ‘Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.’

III. The wickedness of burning the Book.—We can see the wickedness of setting fire to the tabernacle, or temple, or a church, because each is God’s house. Show why the Word is even more sacred. In it more of God and less of man. We can see how wicked it would be to burn all the barns which stored a nation’s food: how much worse to destroy the truth, which is the food of souls. The reason for killing Jesus is the reason for burning the Bible, ‘men hate the light, and love darkness rather.’

IV. The uselessness of burning the Book.—Some Baruch will be set writing another. The true Phœnix tale; from the ashes of burnt Bibles new editions have sprung. Illustrated by Professor Rogers’ dream of the ‘blank Bible’ in Eclipse of Faith. He beautifully shows how every part of it could be fetched back again out of Christian memories. Men may snatch the Bible from our hands, as the king did; they cannot take it out of our hearts.

Illustration

‘As a contrast, the case of Josiah may be recalled. When the lost Book of the Law had been found, Josiah rent his garments in great distress, because he now saw how he had sinned and that wrath was hanging over his head. Instead of repentance in Jehoiakim, we have defiance and presumption. Instead of listening reverently to the Divine words, he tore the roll in pieces and threw it into the fire.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/jeremiah-36.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 36:23 And it came to pass, [that] when Jehudi had read three or four leaves, he cut it with the penknife, and cast [it] into the fire that [was] on the hearth, until all the roll was consumed in the fire that [was] on the hearth.

Ver. 23. When Jehudi had read three or four leaves.] Vespasian is said to have been patientissimus veri, (a) very patient of truth; so was good Josiah, whose heart melted at the hearing of the law; [2 Chronicles 34:27] but so was not this degenerate son of his, Jehoiakim, but more like Tiberius, that tiger, who tore with his teeth all that displeased him; or like Vitellius the tyrant, of whom Tacitus (b) saith, Ita formatae principis aures, ut aspera quae utilia: nec quidquam nisi iucundum et non laesurum acciperet, That his ears were of that temper that he could hear no counsel, though never so profitable, unless it were pleasant, and did suit with his humours.

He cut it with the penknife.] Why? what could he dislike in that precious piece? Of Petronius’s Satyricon one said well, Tolle obscaena et tollis omnia; of Jeremiah’s prophecies I may safely say, Tolle sancta, et tollis omnia. But this brutish prince could not away with downright truth, &c.

And cast it into the fire.] O stultitiam! quid innocentes chartae commeruerant? (c) O madness! what evil had those innocent papers deserved that they nmst die this double death, as it were? Those magical books at Ephesus were worthily burned; [Acts 19:19] Aretine’s love-books are so lascivious that they deserve to be burned, saith Boissard, (d) together with their author; many seditious pamphlets are now committed to Vulcan to be corrected, and more should be; but, O sancta Apocalysis! as that martyr once said when he took up the book of the Revelation, cast into the same fire with himself; so, O holy Jeremiah! what hast thou said or written to be thus slashed, and then cast into the fire? Jehoiakim is the first we read of that ever offered to burn the Bible. Antiochus, indeed, did the like afterwards, and Dioclesian the tyrant, and now the Pope. But though there were not a Bible left upon earth, yet "for ever, O Lord, thy Word is stablished in heaven," saith David. [Psalms 119:89]

Until all the roll was consumed.] So far was he from repenting of his wickedness, that he fed his eyes with such a sad spectacle, and was ready to say, as Solon did when he burned the usurers’ bonds in Athens, that he never saw a fairer or clearer fire burn in all his life.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-36.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 36:23

I. The case of the Rechabites is the extreme of obedience; the story of Jehoiakim's burning the roll represents the extreme of disobedience. Between these two cases, thus brought into contrast with one another, almost within the same page, the conduct of the great mass of mankind is always hovering. Few equal the extreme of obedience set forth on the one hand, as few the extreme of disobedience set forth on the other. Thousands who disobey the Bible every day would shrink from the thought of burning it in utter defiance. Thousands who will do what they see to be just and reasonable will make no scruple of breaking a command which seems to them, in its own nature, indifferent.

II. That we are almost all of us, old and young, wanting in the principle of obedience, might be concluded pretty surely from the simple fact that we do not like the very word. The word "independence," which is the opposite to obedience, is, on the contrary, a great favourite with us; we consider that it is at once delightful and honourable. Tracing this up to its origin, it is certainly in part, nothing but evil; for it is made up largely of pride, and pride is ignorance of God. What is called the feeling of independence, is admired chiefly because it shows the absence of fear. But if obedience were rendered, not from fear, but from principle, it would then be nobler, because it would imply greater self-denial than the feeling of independence; for the feeling of independence is, in other words, a wish to have our own way, a wish in which there is nothing at all noble or admirable, except in as far as it is exercised in the face of the fear of danger. Set aside the existence of fear, and independence becomes no better than self-will; while obedience becomes self-denial for the sake of others—that is benevolence or charity.

III. There can be no obedience to God without virtue and duty, but the word implies something more; it implies doing our duty because God commands it; it implies a deep and abiding sense of our relation to Him; that we are not, nor ever can be, independent beings but dependent creatures; and that, by practising obedience to our Maker, by doing His will because it is His will, and because we love Him, we shall be raised to a higher and more endearing name; no longer creatures, but children.

T. Arnold, Sermons, vol. iii., p. 210.


I. Why has God given us the Bible? Not to bewilder us, not to tempt our curiosity, not to found rival sects, but to bring us to Himself to obtain forgiveness of iniquity and sin. The one object of the Bible is the salvation of mankind.

II. Man is so unwilling to hear anything unpleasant or disagreeable about himself that he gets into a wrong temper before he actually knows what God's object is. Jehoiakim did not hear the whole roll. Did any man ever destroy the Bible who knew it wholly? The difficulty is in the "three or four leaves."

III. Men have not destroyed revelation when they have destroyed the Bible. The penknife cannot reach its spirit, the fire cannot touch its life. The history of the Bible is one of the proofs of its inspiration.

IV. The desire to cut the Bible with the penknife and to cast it into the fire, is quite intelligible, because in a sense profoundly natural.

V. This desire to mutilate the Holy Word shows itself in various ways, some of them apparently innocent*; others of them dignified with fine names, and claiming attention as the last developments of human progress. Human nature shows itself most vividly in the treatment of the Bible.

Parker, The Ark of God, p. 217; see also Penny Pulpit, No. 899.


Notice some lessons which this subject suggests.

I. Those who in their early days have resisted holy influences, generally turn out the most wicked of men. When a man deliberately tramples on conviction, and resists the dealings of God's spirit, he uses the most effectual means to sear his conscience and harden his heart.

II. If a man's religion is not genuine and heart deep, it often happens that troubles and calamities only drive him further away from God. What effect had all his misfortunes and disasters on Jehoiakim? Did they soften him? Did they incline him to a better course of life? Not a bit. He grew worse than ever.

III. As the heart gets hardened in sin, there is a growing unwillingness to listen to the voice of God. As soon as a young man begins an evil course, and resolves to take his fill of sinful pleasures, he acquires a hatred of his Bible, and a disinclination to attend the house of God. If he cannot silence God's ministers, he will keep as far as possible from them, and shut his ears against all good counsel.

J. Thain Davidson, The City Youth, p. 225.


References: Jeremiah 36:3.—Homiletic Quarterly, vol. i., p. 551. Jeremiah 36:22, Jeremiah 36:23.—J. Cox, Expositions, 2nd series, p. 192. Jeremiah 36:23.—Preacher's Monthly, vol. iv., p. 231; D. Moore, Penny Pulpit, No. 3504.


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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/jeremiah-36.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 36:23. Three or four leaves Their books were in the form of a scroll, and consisted of several pieces of parchment rolled upon each other. It must be likewise noted, however, that by leaves several understand columns or partitions, into which the breadth of the parchment was divided. A variety of Hebrew manuscripts in the Bodleian library, as well as a curious one found at Herculaneum, are evidences for the reality of this manner of writing. Houbigant reads pages; which, says he, were the same with those now found in the parchments called "The volumes of the synagogue;" in which the parchments are not sewn one beneath the other; for if this was the case, the volume would only have one page, whose beginning would be at the top, and its end at the bottom of the parchment: but the parchments are sewn on the side of each other; which are read by unfolding the volume either to the right or left; so that there are as many pages as there are parchments.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-36.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He, that is, the king, not having patience to hear above three or four columns, or periods, or titles, took the penknife that (it is like) Jehudi had, and cut it in pieces, and burned it in the fire that was before him, not considering that it was the revelation of the will of God, but exalting himself above all that was called God. This showed both the wickedness and passionate temper of this prince, and his high contempt of God and his prophets.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-36.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

23. Three or four leaves — Rather, columns. The exact word here is doors. This was a continuous roll, but the writing, as is customary, was in sections or columns. Cut it, etc. — That is, the king, not Jehudi, “cut it.” The act illustrates the violence of the king’s temper. The book had made a deep impression on the princes, and they were careful to provide for its safe keeping when they sent to tell the king, but he incontinently destroys it. It is manifestly an error to interpret, as some do, that as often as three or four columns were read they were cast on the brazier, and that this process was kept up until the entire roll was read through and burned up, as this would be silly and incredible.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-36.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

After Jehudi had read a few columns of text, Jehoiakim reached over and cut off what he had read and tossed it into the fire. He did this with the whole scroll; he burned it all up. This was a symbolic act; Jehoiakim was claiming that Jeremiah"s prophecies would come to an end just as surely as his scroll came to an end. [Note: M. Kessler, "The Significance of Jeremiah 36 ," Zeitschrift fr die Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft81 (1969):382.] Jehoiakim"s slow, methodical destruction of the scroll made his rejection of its message a much more emphatic gesture than if he had burned the whole thing at once in a fit of rage. [Note: Kidner, p121.]

Scrolls consisted of several sheet of papyrus or parchment that had been glued together and wrapped around a small rod. As the reader rolled the scroll off the rod and read it from right to left, the printing appeared in parallel, perpendicular columns that resembled doors. The Hebrew word for "column," delathoth, literally means "door." Binding documents in book (codex) form was unknown in Old Testament times.

This king"s response to hearing the Lord"s Word stands in stark contrast to that of his father Josiah, who tore his clothes in remorse when he heard the law scroll read to him ( 2 Kings 22:11-20). Josiah had feared and called the people to repentance, but Jehoiakim feared nothing and called for the prophet"s arrest.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-36.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Jeremiah 36:23. When Jehudi had read three or four leaves — Hebrew, דלתות, rolls, or scrolls, for their books, as we have observed, consisted of several pieces of parchment rolled upon each other. Dr. Waterland renders the word columns, and Blaney, sections, observing that to render it leaves, “seems rather to carry an eye to the books of modern times, than to suit that ancient mode of writing.” The word primarily signifies doors, that open and shut, and therefore is properly enough put for distinct and separate rolls, or parts of those prophecies which, being delivered at different times, and having a relation to different subjects, have each a proper beginning and ending of its own. Houbigant reads, pages, which he says, “were the same with those now found in the parchments called, ‘The Volumes of the Synagogue,’ in which the parchments are not sewed one beneath another; for if this were the case, the volume would only have one page, whose beginning would be at the top, and its end at the bottom of the parchment; but the parchments are sewed one to another on their sides, and are read by unfolding the volume either to the right or left; so that there are as many pages as there are parchments.” He cut it with a penknife — Hebrew, בתער הספר, the knife of the scribe. It seems the implements for writing were lying on the table before the king, ready for the scribe’s or secretary’s use, in case there was any call for writing orders, or despatches. Among these was the knife he used, either for cutting the pen when necessary, or for making erasures. And cast into the fire until all the roll was consumed — Not considering or not regarding its containing a revelation of the will of God, and a divine message to him in particular: a piece this of as daring impiety as a man could easily be guilty of, and a most impudent affront to the God of heaven!


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/jeremiah-36.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Pages. Perhaps what was written on so many skins, (Haydock) or sheets of paper, pasted together, and rolled up; or there might be some marks to shew the different subjects, like the sections used in the synagogue, (Calmet) or our chapters; though we are assured that all was formerly written without any separation even of letters. Protestants have "leaves." (Haydock) --- Hebrew, "doors." (Calmet) The secretary cut and burnt the leaves by the king's order, ver. 25. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-36.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

leaves = columns.

he: i.e. the king.

cut it = cut it up into fragments.

penknife = a scribe"s knife. The words of Jehovah are cut up to-day, not with a scribe"s knife, but with scribe"s pens in the hands of the modern critics. Yet they are "not afraid".


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-36.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And it came to pass, that when Jehudi had read three or four leaves, he cut it with the penknife, and cast it into the fire that was on the hearth, until all the roll was consumed in the fire that was on the hearth.

Three or four leaves - not distinct leaves as in a book, but the consecutive spaces or columns on the long roll in the shape of doors (whence the Hebrew name [ d


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-36.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(23) Three or four leaves . . .—The English words suggest the idea of a papyrus book rather than a parchment roll (see Note on Jeremiah 36:4), but the Hebrew word (literally = a door) may indicate the column of writing on such a roll, as well as a leaf. The act, in its childish impatience, betrayed the anger of the king. He could not bear to hear of the seventy years of exile which were in store for his people, and which, if we assume the roll to have included the substance of Jeremiah 25, would have come into one of the earlier columns. The word for “pen-knife” is used generally for any sharp instrument of iron—for a razor (Ezekiel 5:1), and for a sword (Isaiah 7:20). Here it is the knife which was used to shape the reed, or calamus, used in writing. It should, perhaps, be noted that the Hebrew, like the English, leaves it uncertain whether the king himself cut and burnt the roll, or Jehudi with his approval. Jeremiah 36:25 is in favour of the former view. We are reminded, as we read the words, of like orders given by Antiochus Epiphanes for the destruction of the Law (1 Maccabees 1:56), by Diocletian for that of the sacred books of the Christians, perhaps also of those of the Court of Rome for the destruction of the writings of Wyclif and Luther.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-36.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And it came to pass, that when Jehudi had read three or four leaves, he cut it with the penknife, and cast it into the fire that was on the hearth, until all the roll was consumed in the fire that was on the hearth.
he cut
29-31; Deuteronomy 29:19-21; 1 Kings 22:8,27; Psalms 50:17; Proverbs 1:30; 5:12; 13:13; Proverbs 19:21; 21:30; 29:1; Isaiah 5:18,19; 28:14,15,17-22; Revelation 22:19

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:23". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-36.html.

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