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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 36:28

 

 

"Take again another scroll and write on it all the former words that were on the first scroll which Jehoiakim the king of Judah burned.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Take thee again another roll - There was no duplicate of the former preserved; and now God inspired the prophet with the same matter that he had given him before; and there is to be added the heavy judgment that is to fall on Jehoiakim and his courtiers.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-36.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Take thee again another roll,.... Or a piece of parchment; or rather several pieces of parchment glued or rolled up together:

and write in it all the former words that were in the first roll, which Jehoiakim the king of Judah hath burnt; just as when the two tables of the law were broken, two others were made, and the same laws written on them; and so here the same Spirit of God, which brought to the mind of the prophet all his former discourses and prophecies, so that he could readily dictate them to Baruch, could and did renew them again; wherefore Jehoiakim's burning of the roll signified nothing: all attempts to destroy the word of God are in vain; they always have been, and will be; for the word of the Lord endures for ever.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-36.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Take thee again o another scroll, and write in it all the former words that were in the first scroll, which Jehoiakim king of Judah hath burned.

(o) Though the wicked think to have abolished the word of God when they have burnt the book of it, yet this declares that God will not only raise it up again but also increase it in greater abundance to their condemnation as in (Jeremiah 36:32).

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-36.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

all the former words — It is in vain that the ungodly resist the power of Jehovah: not one of His words shall fall to the ground (Matthew 5:18; Acts 9:5; Acts 5:39).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-36.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

By these words the Prophet shews what the ungodly gain by contending against God; for however hard and refractory, they must necessarily be broken down by God’s power. This happened to King Jehoiakim. We saw in yesterday’s Lecture how furious he was when he cut and burned the volume, and also ordered the Prophet to be slain. But it now follows, that another volume was written.

Now God deals in different ways with the rebellious. For at one time he passes by or leaves timre, when he sees that he spends in vain his labor in admonishing them. He then sends no more his Prophets to reprove or threaten, but silently executes his judgments. And for this reason it is said,

“My Spirit shall no more contend with man, because he is flesh.” (Genesis 6:3)

And similar examples everywhere occur, that is, that when God saw that the prophetic doctrine was despised, he raised his hand against the ungodly, and at the same time ceased to speak to them. But here he purposed in a different way to break down the violence of Jehoiakim, for he caused another volume to be written He foolishly thought that God’s power was in a manner cut off, or extinguished by fire, because the book was reduced to ashes. But God shews that his word cannot be bound or restrained. Then he begins anew to threaten, not because he hoped for any benefit from this repetition, but because it was necessary to expose to ridicule the madness of the king, who had so presumptuously dared to despise both God and his holy Prophet.

The first thing then is, that the Prophet was bidden to write another roll, after the King Jehoiakim vented his rage against the roll read before him; and hence he carefully repeats the words, Take to thee another roll, and write in it the same words which were in the first book; as though he had said, “Let not a syllable be omitted, but let that which I once proclaimed by thy mouth, remain unchanged; and let thus all the ungodly know that thou hast faithfully delivered what thou didst receive from my mouth.” It follows —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-36.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

‘BURNED, BUT NOT CONSUMED’

‘Take thee again another roll.’

Jeremiah 36:28

God laid it upon Jeremiah’s heart to gather his prophecies into a single roll. For this work the prophet employed Baruch, a man whose business gifts we have already heard of (Jeremiah 32:12). It may be that Jeremiah, like many another prophet, had not the pen of a ready writer. And just as St. Paul employed another hand in writing most of his glorious epistles, so did Jeremiah dictate his summary to his amanuensis Baruch. What a debt do we all owe to Baruch in helping the prophet in this lasting work! Now at this time Jeremiah, though not in prison, was under some restraint from prophesying. So Baruch took the roll and went to the Temple, and there from a balcony read it to the people. Then he was sent for to read it to the princes, for the princes had not been in church that day; and so at last the tidings of the sermon came to the ears of Jehoiakim himself. The king did not summon Baruch to his presence. He sent a courtier to fetch the roll. Probably the courtier then (like many now) was not just a man of first-rate education. And we can imagine how he would halt and stammer, and add to the growing anger of the king, who was lying warming himself beside the brazier, for it was winter time and cold. But the courtier was not left to stammer long—three or four pages was all he stumbled through—when the king snatched the roll from him, and hacked it with his knife, and flung it, roller and all, into the fire. And there it burned, yet it was not consumed, either in its message or its form, for the message was terribly fulfilled, and at God’s bidding it was all rewritten.

There are three lessons which we ought to learn here.

I. The first is the kindness of severity.—The prophets of God were terribly severe, yet only thus could they be kind to Israel. It was one mark of every false prophet that he was easy and compliant and accommodating. It was one mark of every true prophet that he was terrible in his passion against sin. Yet the latter were the truest friends of Israel, and loved Israel with an enduring love, and were never kinder to their unhappy land than when they voiced the judgments of Jehovah.

II. The next is the foolishness of temper, for was not Jehoiakim supremely foolish?—Was anything gained for himself or for his country by this mad act of an unbridled anger? There is an anger which is wise and holy, and a wrath which is as the wrath of the Lamb; but there is an anger far more common than that, in which everything is lost and nothing gained.

III. The last is the penalty of rejection.—Do you note what we read in Jeremiah 32:32? Not only did Jeremiah re-write his roll, but he added to it ‘many like words.’ That is to say, the message that was scorned became a message of increased severity. The roll that was rejected with contempt, grew into a roll of sterner judgment. And that is what every one is sure to find who spurns the message of the love of God, and flings away from him, in pride of heart, the summons and the warning of the prophets.

Illustration

‘In many ages there has been this folly of burning Bibles and prophets, but it has only added to the light and fire of the increasing truth. Latimer, when being burned with Ridley at Oxford, in 1555, said: “Be of good comfort, Master Ridley, and play the man; we shall this day light such a candle by God’s grace in England as I trust shall never be put out.” The well-known words of Fuller, finding in the burning of the bones of John Wycliffe, the great translator of the Bible, when the ashes were cast into the Wye river, and so into the Severn, and at last into the great sea, a symbol of the ever-spreading circle of his influence, illustrate the same thought of the eternity of truth. The all-illuminating case is, of course, the crucifixion of Christ, the Truth.’


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/jeremiah-36.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 36:28 Take thee again another roll, and write in it all the former words that were in the first roll, which Jehoiakim the king of Judah hath burned.

Ver. 28. Take thee again another roll.] Revertere, accipe. God’s ministers must be steadfast and unweariable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as they know that their labour is not in vain in the Lord. [1 Corinthians 15:58]

And write in it all the former words.] If all the tyrants on earth should fight against the very paper of the Scriptures, striving to abolish it, yet they could not possibly do it. There will be Bibles when they shall be laid low enough in the slimy valley, where are many already like them, and more shall come after them. [Job 21:31-32]


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-36.html. 1865-1868.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

another roll. See the Structure, (p. 1069). We are not told what became of this, so it may have got, later, into the hands of Nehemiah, when he visited the Temple ruins.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-36.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Take thee again another roll, and write in it all the former words that were in the first roll, which Jehoiakim the king of Judah hath burned.

All the former words. It is in vain that the ungodly resist the power of Yahweh; not one of His words shall fall to the ground (Matthew 5:18; Acts 9:5; Acts 5:39).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-36.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Take thee again another roll, and write in it all the former words that were in the first roll, which Jehoiakim the king of Judah hath burned.
28:13,14; 44:28; Job 23:13; Zechariah 1:5,6; Matthew 24:35; 2 Timothy 2:13

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 36:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-36.html.

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