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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 37:13

 

 

While he was at the Gate of Benjamin, a captain of the guard whose name was Irijah, the son of Shelemiah the son of Hananiah was there; and he arrested Jeremiah the prophet, saying, "You are going over to the Chaldeans!"

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans - Thou art a deserter, and a traitor to thy country. As he had always declared that the Chaldeans should take the city, etc., his enemies took occasion from this to say he was in the interest of the Chaldeans, and that he wished now to go to them, and betray the place.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-37.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A captain of the ward - Captain of the watch, whose business was to examine all who went in and out.

The gate of Benjamin - The northern gate, also called the gate of Ephraim.

Thou fallest away … - His well-known views made Jeremiah a suspected person, though the charge was groundless.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-37.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when he was in the gate of Benjamin,.... One of the gates of the city so called, either because it stood in the tribe of Benjamin, as part of Jerusalem did; or because it led to the land of Benjamin, whither the prophet was going: and just as he had got to that gate, and was going through it, he was stopped by

a captain of the ward there; who was placed at this gate, that none should go out to the Chaldeans, according to Kimchi; but rather he was the keeper of the gate, not at this time only, but always; JosephusF9Antiqu. l. 10. c. 7. sect. 3. calls him one of the rulers:

whose name was Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah: the grandson as some think, of that Hananiah the false prophet, of whose death Jeremiah the prophet prophesied, Jeremiah 28:16; and the Jews have a tradition that Hananiah ordered his son Shelemiah, that if he ever had an opportunity to bring Jeremiah to ruin, to do it; and the same charge Shelemiah gave to his son Irijah, who, having this opportunity, laid hold on him; Jarchi, Kimchi, and Abarbinel, make mention of it:

and he took Jeremiah the prophet, saying, thou fallest away to the Chaldeans; it looks as if, though he might not have a family grudge against him, as the Jews suggest, yet had a hatred of him for his prophecies, and therefore fixes this calumny on him; for otherwise, why did he suffer the people to pass in great numbers without any such charge?


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-37.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And when he was in the g gate of Benjamin, a captain of the guard [was] there, whose name [was] Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah; and he took Jeremiah the prophet, saying, Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans.

(g) By which men went into the country of Benjamin.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-37.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

ward — that is, the “guard,” or “watch.”

Hananiah — whose death Jeremiah predicted (Jeremiah 28:16). The grandson in revenge takes Jeremiah into custody on the charge of deserting (“thou fallest away,” Jeremiah 38:19; Jeremiah 52:15; 1 Samuel 29:3) to the enemy. His prophecies gave color to the charge (Jeremiah 21:9; Jeremiah 38:4).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-37.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

When he was entering the gate of Benjamin, where Jeriah the son of Shelemiah kept watch, the latter seized him, saying, "Thou desirest to go over to the Chaldeans" ( נפל אל־ , see on Jeremiah 21:9). The gate of Benjamin (Jeremiah 38:7; Jeremiah 14:10) was the north gate of the city, through which ran the road to Benjamin and Ephraim; hence it was also called the gate of Ephraim, 2 Kings 14:13; Nehemiah 8:16. בּעל , "holder of the oversight," he who kept the watch, or commander of the watch at the gate. "The accusation was founded on the well-known views and opinions of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 21:9); but it was mere sophistry, for the simple reason that the Chaldeans were no longer lying before the city" (Hitzig).


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Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/jeremiah-37.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And when he was in the gate of Benjamin, a captain of the ward was there, whose name was Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah; and he took Jeremiah the prophet, saying, Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans.

Of Benjamin — The gate that looked toward the inheritance of that tribe.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-37.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

But he then adds, that he was intercepted by the prefect of the ward in the gate of Benjamin That gate had its name from its situation, for a part of Jerusalem belonged to the tribe of Benjamin; and hence it was not strange that the gate which led to the heritage of the tribe of Benjamin was so called. There then was Jeremiah intercepted by Irijah, the prefect of the ward, and not without a grievous charge, that he was escaping to the Chaldeans. The Prophet attempted to clear himself, but with no effect; for an opinion had prevailed, that he was already in league with the enemies. He thus gained nothing by defending himself, but was taken to the princes, the king’s counsellors.

This passage teaches us that God’s servants cannot escape without being exposed to many calumnies and false suspicions. Jeremiah might at the beginning have evaded this, and according to the perception of the flesh, his exemption or immunity might have been viewed as lawful, for there was now before his eyes the danger, not only of losing his life, but also of his name and reputation, which, to ingenuous and wise men, is of much more value. Had Jeremiah then chosen to evade, he might have made this pretense, — “I am indeed ready to offer my life as a sacrifice a hundred times, but what will it avail me, if I am to be regarded as a revolter?” For he must have thus exposed the very name of God to many blasphemies: they might have said,” This is the Prophet who boasted that he had been sent from above, but he is now become perfidious and a traitor to his own countw, and has tried to deliver up the city into the hands of enemies.” Jeremiah then might have shaken off this burden laid on him; but it was nccessary for him to bear this reproach, with which he was falsely charged. Faithful teachers ought indeed to remove, as far as they can, all calumnies, and to check the wicked and malicious, so that they may not have the occasion to speak evil; but when they have done all, they will not yet exempt themselves from calumny; for their words and their deeds will be misconstrued. Thus Jeremiah was loaded with false charges; for all had persuaded themselves, that as he had so much extolled the power of King Nebuchadnezzar, he had been hired by him for the purpose of depressing the people by fear; and it may be that the violent among them did wilfully and knowingly make his case to appear worse to the ignorant, even by false reports. As then this conviction respecting him prevailed everywhere, he was apprehended as a revolter, as he was going out of the city.

But he says, that he intended to go into the land of Benjamin, so as to separate himself. The verb חלק, chelak, means to divide, to scatter, to dissipate; and hence some have given this meaning, that he went into the land of Benjamin in order to divide his heritage; but this seems harsh and forced. They add, “In the midst of the people,” as though Jeremiah wished to make his land common, and to give it to the people: but in this explanation there is nothing probable or suitable. I therefore doubt not but that Jeremiah sought this as a quiet place, as it is understood by most interpreters, he then went forth towards the land of Benjamin, that he might separate himself; that is, that he might be secluded there in the midst of his people. It is, indeed, a brief mode of speaking, but the meaning is not ambiguous, that he might be there, where he might separate himself from the people, as the places were distant from one another. (107) For he was tired with the city, because he saw that he spent his labor in vain. Some think that he was afraid of being cast into prison, because he had just announced a command greatly disliked; but it is more probable that, he was worn out with weariness, because he saw that he made no impression on men so hard and refractory. Hence then it was, that he wished to withdraw from the presence of the whole people.

Then follows what we have already mentioned, that he was taken in the gate by the keeper Irijah, as though he were revolting to the Chaldeans. We have stated how this suspicion arose, even because he had faithfillly proclaimed the commands of God. We hence see how God tried his servant, when he thus constrained him to speak, so that his words became suspected. And hence also we may gather how thoroughly fixed in the minds of men was that false opinion, for Jeremiah was not heard in his own defense. He indeed said openly that he was not fleeing away, nay, that this was a false charge. It is a lie, he says, I am not fleeing to the Chaldeans

I have already reminded you that the verb נפל nuphal, found here, means properly to fall, but it is to be taken here metaphorically, as signifying to fall away, or to incline to another side. Thou then fallest away or inclinest to the Chaldeans, which was the same thing as to revolt. We see that the Prophet was not charged with a common offense, for it would have been the highest to forsake his own country and to pass over to the enemies: it would have been better for him to die a hundred deaths. But, as I have already said, the servants of God ought to be so courageous as to despise the slanders of the unprincipled, and, when it so pleases God, to prepare themselves for patience whenever any reproach is to be undergone, only let their conscience be always clear before God and angels; and let also their integrity confute all slanders, and let them disprove them too, provided there be those who can bear to hear them: but if a defense be not always admitted, let them patiently bear this indignity. And this also we ought to notice, that God’s servants, though ready to clear themselves of crimes ascribed to them, and to defend their innocence at the peril of life, are yet often repelled and condemned unheard. This is, indeed, a great indignity; but yet as Jeremiah met with such a treatment, it ought not at this day to appear to us unendurable or new. It now follows —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-37.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 37:13 And when he was in the gate of Benjamin, a captain of the ward [was] there, whose name [was] Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah; and he took Jeremiah the prophet, saying, Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans.

Ver. 13. Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah.] Of that Hananiah, say the Rabbis whose death Jeremiah foretold. [Jeremiah 28:16-17] This Hierias ferox adogescens, as Josephus calleth him, a fierce young man, bearing Jeremiah a grudge, layeth hold on him in the gate, and layeth treachery to his charge; unicum crimen eorum qui crimine vacabant. (a)

Saying, Thou fullest away to the Chaldeans.] Jeremiah had spoken much of the Chaldeans’ power, and foretold their victory. Hence he is here falsely accused of falling away to them, and being false to his country. Indeed, if the Chaldees could have fetched off Jeremiah, as the French King Louis did Philip de Comines from the Duke of Burgundy - whose affairs thereupon declined immediately - they might have made very good advantage of him; but he was far enough from any such compliance with them, and could better have said than ever Cicero did, Ne immortalitatem contra temp. aceiperem, I would not be false to my country for more than all this world’s good.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-37.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 37:13. Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans The ground of this accusation was, the prophet's having foretold that the Chaldeans should take the city, and exhorted the Jews to submit to them.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-37.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The gate of Benjamin was some gate that looked toward the inheritance of that tribe, or where those used to go out who went that way; we read of it Jeremiah 38:7. Irijah was a captain of the guard that was set to watch at the gates, to keep people from going out, or at least some persons; for it should seem by Jeremiah’s endeavour to go out in the crowd, they suffered many to go out, as is usual in sieges, when victuals grow scarce; and though the Chaldeans were at present gone, yet they were not out of fear of their coming back. This captain apprehends Jeremiah, as one who was about to desert the city, and fall off to the Chaldeans. That Hananiah the grandfather of this Irijah was the false prophet we read of Jer 28, who died according to Jeremiah’s prophecy, and this his grandchild apprehended Jeremiah in some revenge of his grandfather, is but uncertainly guessed. But Jeremiah’s so frequent prophesying that the Chaldeans should take the city exposed him to this suspicion probably.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-37.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13. Gate of Benjamin — The north gate of the city, called also the gate of Ephraim; as in 2 Kings 14:13.

Captain of the ward — Literally, lord of the oversight, the commander of the watch at the gate.

Fallest away to the Chaldeans — The charge was probably the offspring of personal malice, but the known views of Jeremiah gave colour to it.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-37.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jeremiah was leaving Jerusalem by the northern gate that led to the territory of Benjamin when Irijah, a captain of the guard, arrested him. [Note: Irijah"s ancestor, Hananiah, would not have been the same man who opposed Jeremiah (28:10).] He charged the prophet with defecting to the enemy. Jeremiah had urged others to submit to the Babylonians ( Jeremiah 21:9; Jeremiah 38:2), and some of the people had taken his advice ( Jeremiah 38:2; Jeremiah 38:19; Jeremiah 39:9; Jeremiah 52:15), so the charge was plausible.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-37.html. 2012.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the gate of Benjamin: i.e. the northern gate, called also "the gate of Ephraim" (2 Kings 14:13. Nehemiah 8:16), leading to Anathoth.

Hananiah. Perhaps the false prophet mentioned in Jeremiah 28:1-17.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-37.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And when he was in the gate of Benjamin, a captain of the ward was there, whose name was Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah; and he took Jeremiah the prophet, saying, Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans.

A captain of the ward - i:e., a captain of the guard or watch.

The son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah - whose death Jeremiah predicted (Jeremiah 28:16): the grandson in revenge takes Jeremiah into custody on the charge of deserting ("thou fallest away," Jeremiah 38:19; Jeremiah 52:15; 1 Samuel 29:3) to the enemy. His prophecies gave colour to the charge (Jeremiah 21:9; Jeremiah 38:4).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-37.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) And when he was in the gate of Benjamin . . .—The prophet’s fears were not groundless. He had to leave the city by the entrance known as the gate of Benjamin (Jeremiah 38:7), on the north side (Zechariah 14:10). The officer in command, Irijah, the son of Shelemiah (probably, therefore, the brother of Jehucal, who is named in Jeremiah 37:3, and so probably acquainted with Jeremiah’s last prophetic utterance), charged him with treachery. He was “falling away to the Chaldæans.” It was assumed that, though the Chaldæans had gone, the prophet was about to make his way to their encampment to incite them to return, and so work out the fulfilment of his own prediction. The very phrase “thou fallest away” may have been an allusive reference to Jeremiah’s own words in Jeremiah 21:9, if, with the best critics, we refer those words to an earlier date than the raising of the siege.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-37.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when he was in the gate of Benjamin, a captain of the ward was there, whose name was Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah; and he took Jeremiah the prophet, saying, Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans.
in the
38:7; Zechariah 14:10
Hananiah
38:1,10-17; 36:12
Thou
18:18; 20:10; 21:9; 27:6,12,13; 28:14; 38:4,17; Amos 7:10; Luke 23:2; Acts 6:11; 24:5-9,13; 2 Corinthians 6:8

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 37:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-37.html.

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