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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 46:25

 

 

The LORD of hosts, the God of Israel, says, "Behold, I am going to punish Amon of Thebes, and Pharaoh, and Egypt along with her gods and her kings, even Pharaoh and those who trust in him.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The multitude of No - מנא אמון Amon minno, the Amon of No, called by the Greeks Διοσπολις, or Jupiter's city. It was the famous Thebes, celebrated anciently for its hundred gates. Amon was the name by which the Egyptians called Jupiter, who had a famous temple at Thebes.

The word Pharaoh is twice repeated here; and Dr. Dahler thinks that one may design Pharaoh Hophrah, and the other Amasis, the new king.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-46.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The multitude of No - Rather, Amon of No. Ammon or Jupiter-Ammon was the first of the supreme triad of Thebes. He was the deity invisible and unfathomable, whose name signifies “the concealed.” No-Amon, is the sacred city of Thebes, the capital of Upper Egypt. First then Yahweh‘s anger falls upon the representatives of the highest divine and human powers, Amon of No and Pharaoh. It next punishes Egypt generally, and her gods and her kings, for each city had its special divinity, and inferior rulers were placed in the several parts of the country. Finally, Pharaoh is again mentioned, with “all who trust in him,” i. e., the Jews, who had made Egypt their confidence and not God.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-46.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

NO-AMON TO BE DESTROYED

Jehovah of hosts, the God of Israel, saith, Behold, I will punish Amon of No, and Pharaoh, and Egypt with her gods, and with her kings, even Pharaoh, and them that trust in him: and I will deliver them into the hands of those that seek their lives, and into the hands of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, and into the hands of his servants; and afterward it shall be inhabited, as in the days of old, saith Jehovah."

Unlike the prophecy of Isaiah regarding Babylon, and of Nahum regarding Nineveh, Jeremiah here prophesied that the destruction of Egypt would not be perpetual. Twenty-six centuries afterward, the prophecies still stand as the prophets said, still fulfilled by history. Why? Because the prophecies are God's words, not the words of men.

"Amon of No ..." (Jeremiah 46:25). "Amon was the chief god of Upper Egypt, and No (Thebes) was the capital and principal city of the area."[20]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/jeremiah-46.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, saith,.... These titles are often given to the Lord, and set before prophecies that come from him; and, according to Kimchi, the reason why he is here spoken of as the God of Israel was, because the vengeance threatened to the Egyptians should come upon them, as a punishment for using Israel ill; as Shishak king of Egypt, and Pharaohnecho, who slew Josiah:

behold, I will punish the multitude of No; the inhabitants of it, which were many, called "populous No", Nahum 3:8; a famous city in Egypt. Some take it to be Diospolis or Thebes; and othersF16R. David Ganz. Chronolog. par. 2. fol. 10. 1. Elias in Tishbi, p. 11. the same that is now called Alexandria; and so the Targum renders it; and which is followed by the Vulgate Latin version: and Jarchi calls it the seignory or government of Alexandria; and takes Amon, the word for "multitude", to signify the prince of this place; and so Kimchi and Ben Melech interpret it, king of a city called No: rather Jupiter AmmonF17Vid. Schmidt in loc & Stockium, p. 71. So Bochart. Phaleg. l. 1. c. 1. col. 5, 6. is meant, an idol of the Egyptians, which had a temple in Thebes, and was worshipped in it; and who had his name from Ham, the son of Noah. HillerusF18Onomastic. Sacr. p. 571, &c. , by various arguments, endeavours to prove that No is the same city with Memphis, and that No Amon signifies "the habitation of the nourished"; that is, of Apis, which was nourished here. But be he who he will, or the place what it will, he or that would certainly be punished;

and Pharaoh, and Egypt, with their gods, and their kings; Pharaoh, the present king of Egypt, who was Pharaohhophra, and all the land of Egypt; and all their numerous idols, which were many indeed; and the several governors of the nomes or provinces into which the land was distributed; these should be punished, and suffer in the general calamity;

even Pharaoh, and all them that trust in him; the Jews that dwelt in Egypt, and who thought themselves safe under his protection; such who went along with Johanan thither, contrary to the will of God; these should not escape punishment, but be involved in the same destruction.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-46.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The LORD of hosts, the God of Israel, saith; Behold, I will punish the y multitude of No, and Pharaoh, and Egypt, with their gods, and their kings; even Pharaoh, and [all] them that trust in him:

(y) Some take the Hebrew word Amon for the kings name of No, that is, of Alexandria.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-46.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

multitudeHebrew, “Amon” (Nahum 3:8, Margin, “No-Ammon”), the same as Thebes or Diospolis in Upper Egypt, where Jupiter Ammon had his famous temple. In English Version, “multitude” answers to “populous No” (Nahum 3:8; Ezekiel 30:15). The reference to “their gods” which follows, makes the translation more likely, “Ammon of No,” that is, No and her idol Ammon; so the Chaldee Version. So called either from Ham, the son of Noah; or, the “nourisher,” as the word means.

their kings — the kings of the nations in league with Egypt.


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-46.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The Prophet speaks again in God’s name, and sets God’s glory in opposition to the perverseness of his own nation; for, as it has been said, he effected but little when he threatened the Egyptians. For the Jews, believing that land to be impregnable, were secure; because they thought that the Egyptians would come to their aid, and so they believed that they were fortified against any hostile power. As then the Jews were inebriated with this false confidence, the Prophet was constrained, not only with many words to enlarge on this subject, but also to introduce God as the judge.

He then does not speak here in his own words, but says, Jehovah of hosts, the God of Israel, hath spoken, Behold I, etc. It was a form of speaking much more forcible than if the Prophet had repeated in his own name what God had committed to him; and yet the Jews were not moved: but still this mode of speaking was calculated to break down their obduracy. he then says, Behold, I will visit the multitude, etc. The word אמון, amun, is to be taken here for המון, emun; א , aleph, is put for ה , he; though some render it “king,” but improperly: I will visit the multitude which is from Alexandria We know that this was a celebrated city of Egypt, though it had not yet this name; for Alexander was not born, who called it by his own name; but it had its old name נא, na, and it was so called by the Hebrews. In after time it was called Alexandria, its name having been changed.

But there is here a statement of a part for the whole, for the Prophet included the whole of Egypt; what is general is comprehended under what is particular; for God spared not the other cities of Egypt; and it appears from the context that the prophecy extended to all parts of that land, not one angle, even the least, being excepted. But as Alexandria might have remained safe, while the other cities were destroyed, it is here especially mentioned, as though he had said, that nothing would be safe in Egypt. Behold, he says, I will visit the multitude, etc. It was a very populous city, as we gather from heathen writers; and hence it was that it was full of pride, for they thought it sufficiently safe when they had as it were a proportionate army. But the Prophet derides this vain glory, and says that the vast number of people in Alexandria would avail nothing to prevent the Chaldeans to take possession of it.

I will visit, he says, the whole people, and then Pharaoh and Egypt We now clearly see that the city named was the chief city, and that its multitude was expressly mentioned, that the Egyptians might know, that they could not escape destruction, because they had war with God, and not with men; for as long as they looked on the Chaldeans alone, they remained secure. But the Prophet awakens them from their lethargy, and says, that they were not to look on what the Chaldeans of themselves could do, for they would carry on war under the banner of God, and under his guidance would, without any difficulty, penetrate through the whole of Egypt. Hence he says, I will visit Pharaoh and Egypt

He adds, and her gods. We know that that land was very much given to superstitions, that the Egyptians had imbibed gross and shameful errors, though otherwise remarkable for their wisdom and knowledge. But God had smitten them with madness, so that they were become almost like brute beasts. Besides, as they thought that they had perfect safety in their idols, the Prophet shakes off this confidence, and declares that God would not only be the judge of men but also of the idols. For we know that men strengthen themselves against God’s threatenings either by superstition or by confidence in their own strength: as long as they depend on the world, they gather from all quarters some grounds of hope; and hence it is, that they think that they will be safe though in opposition to God’s will. The Prophet beats down this folly when he says, Behold, I will visit the multitude of Alexandria, and adds,I will visit the gods of Egypt. As the unbelieving, when they find earthly aids not sufficient for them, flee to God, but not in the right way, for they become vain in their foolish thoughts; hence is the reason why the Prophet threatens the idols of Egypt.

He adds, her kings. There was indeed but one king in Egypt, why then does he mention kings? This may be explained of successors; but I prefer taking “kings” here as meaning the satraps and princes, for we know that the kingdom was very opulent, that it had many equal to kings. I therefore think that the Prophet adorned the princes and satraps of Egypt with this high title; and he confirms this opinion by what immediately follows, even — Pharaoh and those who trust in him He repeats the name of Pharaoh, and when he says that he would visit those who trust in him, I doubt not but that the Prophet points out those whom he had before designated “kings.” We now then perceive the real meaning, that though Pharaoh had many defenses, being strengthened by a great multitude of men, and had also mighty satraps, yet all this would prove fading and evanescent, when he would have to carry on war with God: and God declares here that he would be the general of the whole war guiding and directing the Chaldeans. It now follows, —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-46.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

trust

(See Scofield "Psalms 2:12").


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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Jeremiah 46:25". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/jeremiah-46.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 46:25 The LORD of hosts, the God of Israel, saith; Behold, I will punish the multitude of No, and Pharaoh, and Egypt, with their gods, and their kings; even Pharaoh, and [all] them that trust in him:

Ver. 25. The Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, saith.] And shall he say and not do? [Numbers 23:19] Shall the word of God be broken [John 10:35]


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-46.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 46:25. I will punish the multitude of No I will punish Ammon of No. Ezekiel calls it, Haman No; and Nahum calls it No-Amon. The name is generally thought to be derived from Jupiter Ammon, whose temple was in this city: supposed to be the same which profane authors call Thebes, celebrated in Homer's time for its hundred gates. The LXX render it Diospolis, the Greek name for Thebes, a city famous for the worship of Jupiter Ammon. See Boch. Phaleg. part 1: lib. 1: cap. 6. Heredotus, lib. 3: and Universal History, vol. 2: p. 89.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-46.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, saith: these names are often in conjunction given unto God, the first signifying his power or ability to do what he either promiseth or threateneth, the other speaking his kindness and near relation to the Jews.

Behold, I will punish the multitude of No: there are great critical disputes about this phrase, whether the word translated

multitude signifies so, (as it doth Jeremiah 52:15) and if so, whether it should not be multitude from No; or whether it signifies the nourisher, (as some would have it,) because No (which some think is the same city with that at this time called Alexandria, being a great place of merchandise) nourished all the adjacent parts; but it is no easy thing to resolve the question, nor is the resolution of it of much moment to us. By those that trusted in Pharaoh the Jews are most probably meant, who all along in their prosperity put too much confidence in Egypt, and after that Jerusalem was taken some of them (as we before heard) fled into Egypt for sanctuary.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-46.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

25. Multitude of No — Rather, Amon of No, referring to the principal idol of Egypt, whose chief seat was at Thebes, here called “No.”


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-46.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The sovereign Yahweh, Israel"s God, announced that He would punish the gods, rulers, and people of Egypt. Amon was the chief deity of No (Gr. Thebes), the capital of Upper Egypt. Even though there is as yet no evidence that Nebuchadnezzar advanced this far in his conquest of Egypt, his invasion affected the whole nation.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-46.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Visit upon. That is, punish. --- Alexandria. In the Hebrew No; which was the ancient name of the city, to which Alexander [the Great] gave afterwards the name of Alexandria; (Challoner) or this city was built near Rachotes, the harbour. "Ammon of No" was rather Diospolis, (Ezechiel xxx. 14.; Septuagint) in the [Nile] Delta, north of Busiris. Ammon was the chief god adored at No, Nahum iii. 8. Alexandrian Septuagint, "I will revenge myself on Ammon, her son, on Egypt, or Pharao, and on them." (Haydock) --- Ammon was of their invention, and for this the people were justly punished. It means also, "a multitude." --- Kings. Chap. xlii. 12. Apries was slain, (chap. xliv. 33.; Calmet) and his two successors perished miserably by sentence of Cambyses. (Herodotus iii. 14, 16.)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-46.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

The LORD of hosts, the God of Israel. See note on Jeremiah 7:3.

God. Hebrew. Elohim. App-4.

Behold. Figure of speech Asterismos, to add to the emphasis of the Divine title employed.

multitude of No: or Amon of Thebes (an Egyptian idol).

trust = confide. Hebrew. batah. App-69.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-46.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The LORD of hosts, the God of Israel, saith; Behold, I will punish the multitude of No, and Pharaoh, and Egypt, with their gods, and their kings; even Pharaoh, and all them that trust in him:

I will punish the multitude of No. The Hebrew for "multitude" is 'Amon' (Nahum 3:8, margin, 'No-amon'), the same as Thebes or Diospolis in Upper Egypt, where Jupiter Ammon had his famous temple. In the English version "multitude" answers to "populous No" (Nahum 3:8; and Ezekiel 30:15, "the multitude of No"). The reference to "their gods" which follows, makes the translation more likely 'Ammon of No' - i:e., No and her idol Ammon; so the Chaldean version. So called either from Ham the son of Noah; or the nourisher [ 'aaman (Hebrew #539)], to nourish faithfully, as the word means.

Their kings - the kings of the nations in league with Egypt.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-46.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(25) The multitude of No.—More accurately, I will punish Amon No. The first word is the Egyptian Ammon or Hammon, but is probably used also, with a natural paronomasia on the name of the city, in its Hebrew sense of “multitude.” “No” here, and as No Amon in Nahum 3:8, stands for Thebes, the capital of Upper Egypt. The name appears in the form NIA in Assyrian inscriptions. Compare also Ezekiel 30:14-16.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-46.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The LORD of hosts, the God of Israel, saith; Behold, I will punish the multitude of No, and Pharaoh, and Egypt, with their gods, and their kings; even Pharaoh, and all them that trust in him:
multitude
or, nourisher. Heb. Amon. No.
Ezekiel 30:14; Nahum 3:8
with their
43:12,13; Exodus 12:12; Isaiah 19:1; Ezekiel 30:13; Zephaniah 2:11
and their
Ezekiel 32:9-12; Nahum 3:9
and all
17:5,6; 42:14-16; Isaiah 20:5,6; 30:2,3; 31:1-3; Ezekiel 39:6,7

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 46:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-46.html.

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