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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 51:10

 

 

The LORD has brought about our vindication; Come and let us recount in Zion The work of the LORD our God!

Adam Clarke Commentary

The Lord hath brought forth our righteousness - This is the answer of the Jews. God has vindicated our cause.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-51.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Yahweh hath brought to the light those things which prove us to be righteous: i. e., by punishing Babylon He hath justified


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-51.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The Lord hath brought forth our righteousness,.... Or "righteousnesses"F9צדקתינו "justitas nostras", V. L. Pagninus, Montanus, Piscator, Cocceius, Schmidt. this, as Kimchi observes, is spoken in the person of the Israelites; not as though the Jews had done no iniquity, for which they were carried captive; they had committed much, and were far from being righteous in themselves, but were so in comparison of the Chaldeans; and who had gone beyond their commission, and had greatly oppressed them, and used them cruelly; and now the Lord, by bringing destruction upon them, vindicated the cause of his people, and showed it to be a righteous one; and that the religion they professed was true, and which the Chaldeans had derided and reproached: this righteousness, not of their persons, but of their cause, and the truth of their holy religion, the Lord brought forth to the light, and made it manifest, by taking their parts, and destroying their enemies:

come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the Lord our God; the Jews encourage one another to return into their own land, rebuild their temple, and set up the worship of God in it; and there declare the wondrous work of God in the destruction of Babylon, and their deliverance from thence; giving him the praise and glory of it; and exciting others to join with them in it, it being the Lord's work, and marvellous in their eyes; and so, when mystical Babylon is destroyed, voices will be heard in heaven, in the church, ascribing salvation, honour, and glory, to God, Revelation 19:1. All this is true, in an evangelic sense, of such as are redeemed by Christ, and brought out of mystical Babylon, and are effectually called by the grace of God; to these the Lord brings forth the righteousness of Christ, which he makes their own, by imputing it to them; and he brings it near to them, and puts it upon them; it is revealed unto them from faith to faith; it is applied to them by the Spirit of God, and put into their hands to plead with God, as their justifying righteousness; and which is brought forth by him on all occasions, to free them from all charges exhibited against them by law or justice, by the world, Satan, or their own hearts, Romans 8:33; and it becomes such persons to declare in Zion, in the church of God, the works of the Lord; not their own, which will not bear the light, nor bear speaking of; but the works of God, of creation and providence; but more especially of grace, as the great work of redemption by Jesus Christ; and particularly the Spirit's work of grace upon their hearts, which is not the work of men, but of God; being a new creation work; a regeneration; a resurrection from the dead; and requiring almighty power, to which man is unfit and unequal: this lies in the quickening of men dead in trespasses and sins; in enlightening such as are darkness itself; in an implantation of the principles of grace and holiness in them; in giving them new hearts and new spirits; and in bringing them off of their own righteousness, to depend on Christ alone for salvation; and which work, as it is begun, will be carried on, and performed in them, until the day of Christ; and, wherever it is, should not be concealed, but should be declared in the gates of Zion, publicly, freely, and fitly and faithfully, to the glory of the grace of God, and for the comfort of his people, to whom every such declaration is matter of joy and pleasure; see Psalm 66:16.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-51.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The LORD hath brought forth our g righteousness: come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the LORD our God.

(g) In approving our cause and punishing our enemies.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-51.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Next after the speech of the confederates of Babylon, comes that of the Jews celebrating with thanksgivings the promise-keeping faithfulness of their covenant God.

brought forth, etc. — (Psalm 37:6).

our righteousness — not the Jews‘ merits, but God‘s faithfulness to Himself and to His covenant, which constituted the “righteousness” of His people, that is, their justification in their controversy with Babylon, the cruel enemy of God and His people. Compare Jeremiah 23:6, “The Lord our righteousness”; Micah 7:9. Their righteousness is His righteousness.

declare in Zion — (Psalm 102:13-21).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-51.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The LORD hath brought forth our righteousness: come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the LORD our God.

Some — These words are spoken in the person of the Jews, owning the destruction of Babylon to be the mighty work of God, and an act of justice, revenging the wrongs of his people.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-51.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The Prophet here addresses the faithful, and especially shows, that the ruin of Babylon would be a sure evidence of God’s paternal favor towards his Church. And it was no common consolation to the faithful, in their extreme miseries, to know, that so dear and precious to God was their salvation, that he would by no means spare the Babylonians, whom the whole world regarded as half gods; for, as I have said, the power of that monarchy filled the minds of men with astonishment. When the faithful, then, knew that the Babylonians were to perish, because they had oppressed and cruelly treated them, an invaluable consolation, as I have said, must hence have been conveyed to them. The Prophet then reminds us here, that it would be a singular testimony as to God’s favor to his Church, when he subverted Babylon, and he also exhorts the faithful to gratitude: for it is the design of all God’s benefits, that his name may be celebrated by us, according to what David says:

“What shall I render to the Lord for all the benefits which he has bestowed on me? The cup of salvation will I take and call on the name of the Lord.” (Psalms 116:12.)

He then says, first, Brought forth hath Jehovah our righteousness Here, some anxiously toil to untie a knot, where there is none; for fearing lest the word, righteousness, should be laid hold on for the purpose of setting up merits, they say that righteousness is the remission of sins. Then they thus explain the words of the Prophet,” God has at length unfolded his mercy towards us, and it is our righteousness when all our iniquities are buried.” But this is forced. When the Prophet speaks here of righteousnesses, he does not mean the merits by which the Jews were to obtain what had been promised to them; but righteousnesses he calls their good cause with regard to the Babylonians. For righteousness has various meanings; and when a comparison is made between men, God is said to bring forth our righteousness, when he vindicates our integrity from the calumnies of the wicked. So Jacob said,

“The Lord will bring forth my righteousness as the dawn.”
(
Genesis 30:33)

But in this sense our righteousness has a reference to our adversaries. So whenever David asked of God to regard his righteousness, he no doubt compared himself with his enemies. And righteousness here is to be taken simply with reference to the Babylonians. For though God had punished the Jews as they deserved, yet as to the Babylonians they were cruel tyrants and wicked robbers. The cause, then, of the chosen people was just, with regard to them. This is the reason why he says, that God brought forth their righteousnesses The rest to-morrow.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-51.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 51:10 The LORD hath brought forth our righteousness: come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the LORD our God.

Ver. 10. The Lord hath brought forth our righteousness,] i.e., Our just cause, and the righteousness of our religion, derided by the Babylonians.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-51.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 51:10. The Lord hath brought forth our righteousness "The Lord hath made manifest the equity of our cause by the judgment which he hath brought upon Babylon." See Jeremiah 51:9.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-51.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1089

DUTY OF ACKNOWLEDGING GOD’S MERCIES

Jeremiah 51:10. Come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the Lord our God!

THE prophets, whilst foretelling future events, are often transported in spirit to the period of which they speak; and are enabled to see, as it were, the events themselves actually passing before their eyes. Hence, if they speak of the rise or fall of kingdoms, they behold the armies marching to their destination, engaging in the conflict, and either conquering or conquered, according as the Governor of the universe has fore-ordained. This is peculiarly manifest in relation to the destruction of Babylon; which is more frequently and more fully predicted than any other event, except those which immediately relate to God’s chosen people [Note: See the thirteenth and fourteenth chapters of Isaiah throughout, and especially chap. 14:4–12.]. It is of that event that the prophet speaks in the chapter before us, as he has also done in the preceding chapter. Having said in the foregoing verses that God would “send fanners to Babylon, to fan,” to destroy her, though the event was not to take place for sixty years, yet he says, “This is the time of the Lord’s recompence;” and then exclaims, “Babylon is suddenly fallen and destroyed! howl ye for her!” He then speaks of the deliverance of the Jews from their captivity as already effected, and calls on them to declare in Zion the wonders which God had wrought for them: “The Lord hath brought forth our righteousness (that is, our deliverance): come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the Lord our God.”

It is not of future events that we are now called to speak, but of things accomplished, as it were, before our eyes, and of things that demand our most grateful acknowledgment.

Let us consider,

I. What is that work which we are now called to declare—

At no period of our history had we ever more reason to bless and adore our God than at this day [Note: This was preached on Jan. 13, 1813.]. The mercies vouchsafed to us have been exceeding great and numerous. We cannot enter into them indeed very fully; but we will suggest some distinct heads, under which they may be arranged for your own more easy and profitable contemplation of them. Consider them then as agricultural and commercial, political and religious. Consider,

1. The agricultural—

[Heavy was the pressure on all the lower orders of society, by reason of the dearness of provisions, throughout the last year: and, if the late harvest had been as unproductive as that which preceded it, their distress would have been at this hour exceeding great. But God in his mercy vouchsafed to us a very abundant harvest, so that now all may “eat and be satisfied, and bless the name of their God.” True it is, that other things still continue at a high price: but that very circumstance only shews us the more forcibly, how rich a mercy it is to have plenty of that which is “the staff of life.” In enumerating then the mercies for which we have now peculiar reason to be thankful, let us not be unmindful of that in which the great mass of the community are so deeply interested, and which is perhaps the first of all national blessings.]

2. Commercial—

[To abridge and to destroy our commerce has been the incessant labour of our enemies: and to such a state was it reduced, that it could scarcely be carried on to any extent, without involving; all the persons engaged in it in the guilt of perjury. The whole continent almost was closed against us: and whatever was surreptitiously introduced there, was subjected to such peril, as to prove a most serious discouragement to all commercial enterprise. But now, within these few weeks only, the whole continent is anxious to receive our goods: our manufactures are revived; our people, who during the last year were almost in a state of insurrection on account of the want of work, are employed; and a good prospect is opened to us of increased and permanent prosperity. This, whether viewed in its aspect on individuals or the nation at large, is another blessing, which ought on no account to be overlooked.]

3. Political—

[Who that looks back to the earlier period of the French Revolution, and recollects what sentiments of insubordination and sedition pervaded the land, must not be surprised at the change that has taken place in relation to those things? Formerly the cry of liberty and equality was raised in almost every place, to instigate the people to throw off all submission to the Government: and such was the delusion by which the minds of many were blinded, that thousands were panting to destroy the constitution, and to establish a democracy in its place. The same bloody scenes as took place in France were preparing for this land also; and so great and general was the infatuation, that many, even of religious characters, were ready to help forward the designs and efforts of those who sought our ruin. But now the excellence of our constitution is duly appreciated; the persons who were once ready to subvert it have now seen their error; and perhaps there is scarcely a man in the land who would not willingly die in its defence. Nor is this change peculiar to us: it is now seen in every part of Europe; and those very people who banished their former Rulers, and overturned fill their former establishments, are now desirous of returning to the state they have forsaken, and are actually fighting for the restoration of their former Governments. Thus has order taken the place of anarchy, and respect for constituted authorities banished from amongst us the demon of discontent.]

4. Religious—

[With a contempt for all ancient institutions, there went forth an utter disregard of Revealed Religion. Infidelity stalked abroad, as it were, at noon-day. It no longer blushed to shew its face, but obtruded itself upon the attention of all; and reviled, as enemies to sense and reason, all who dared to maintain the cause of God in the world. Philosophy forsooth was deemed a safer guide than the voice of inspiration; and the word of God itself was held up to ridicule, as a composition of falsehood and absurdity. How different is the state of things amongst us at this time! The Holy Scriptures are revered and honoured to a degree altogether unprecedented and unknown in this country. All ranks and orders of men amongst us not only receive the sacred volume as true, but stand forth to advocate its cause, and to extend the knowledge of it to every quarter of the globe. If we judged from the zeal exerted for the diffusion of the Holy Scriptures, we should be ready to think that the Millennial period were already come. But, though we cannot yet congratulate ourselves on such an extensive change as this, we nevertheless behold a most astonishing increase of true religion in the land. We are happy too to declare, that a similar spirit is rising in other lands; and that, “whilst God’s judgments have been poured out so awfully and so extensively upon the earth, the inhabitants thereof have been learning righteousness [Note: Isaiah 26:9.].”

These then are mercies which may well “be declared in Zion,” and which we are now called in a more especial manner to commemorate.]

Having drawn your attention to some of those mercies which deserve especial notice at this time, I proceed to shew,

II. In what manner we should declare them—

Since these mercies are so great and numerous, let us all unite in improving them as we ought to do:

1. Let us acknowledge God in them—

[Who is it that “hath wrought all these deliverances for us?” Is it our own hand, our own arm, that hath effected them? Who is it that gave us such a rich abundant harvest? We must be blind indeed, if we see not the hand of God in it [Note: Hosea 2:8. Psalms 65:9-13.] — — — Who is it that hath opened all the ports of the continent to our manufactures? Backward as men are to trace the operation of God in such things, there is scarcely a person in the land that does not say, “This is thine hand; and thou, Lord, hast done it [Note: Psalms 109:27; Psalms 44:3. Isaiah 45:7.]!” And must we not trace the revolution of sentiment to the same source? Who but God can “still the madness of the people?” It is he, and he alone, that “turneth the heart, whether of princes or of people, whithersoever he will [Note: Proverbs 21:1. Psalms 65:7.].” Above all, to whose agency must we refer that great work of dispelling the clouds of infidelity, and of making his light to shine into the hearts of men? Truly, none but He “who commanded the light to shine out of darkness” at the first creation of the world, is sufficient for these things [Note: 2 Corinthians 4:6; 2 Corinthians 5:5.]. In reference then to every thing that has been done for us, we must say, “Not unto us, O Lord, not unto us, but to thy name be the praise!”]

2. We must adore him for them—

[It is not a cold and speculative acknowledgment only that we are called to make: our hearts should be warmed with a sense of God’s mercies: and our lips be devoutly occupied in his praise. The first effect indeed which they should have upon our minds is, to fill us with wonder and admiration of the Divine goodness [Note: Psalms 40:5.]: but when we have, as it were, recovered from the overwhelming sense of his goodness, then should we declare it, and publish it with all the powers of our souls. Look at David, when recounting the mercies God had vouchsafed to Israel [Note: Psalms 98:1-8.]: such is the language which well befits us on the present occasion; yea, we should “make our boast in God all the day long, and praise his name for ever and ever [Note: Psalms 44:7-8.].” In this way “we must declare his work, if we would wisely consider of his doing [Note: Psalms 64:9.].”]

3. Let us, by anticipation, bless God for the yet richer mercies which he has in reserve for us—

[We began with observing, that “the deliverance” from Babylon was yet distant, at least sixty years, though the prophet spoke of it as already accomplished. So may we look forward to the blessings which are made over to us by the sure word of promise, and may even now bless God for them as though they were already possessed. As Abraham rejoiced at the prospect of the day of Christ, just as if he had actually seen it with his eyes, so may we do, and so we ought to do, in reference to his future advent to reign on earth. Then will peace and plenty, and truth and righteousness, prevail throughout the world. Then shall men “beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning hooks, and they will learn war no more.” Then “Judah will no more vex Ephraim, nor Ephraim envy Judah,” but all will “sit harmonious and contented under their own vine and fig-tree.” “The wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid:” nor shall any hurt or destroy in God’s holy mountain. Then, whilst plenty abounds in every place [Note: Amos 9:13-15.], “the knowledge of the Lord shall cover the earth, as the waters cover the sea.” O what a day of wonders will that be! It is our privilege to look forward to it, and even to see it now, as it were, before our eyes. See how the prophet, who lived almost three thousand years ago, beheld it, and gloried in the sight [Note: Isaiah 49:12-13; Isaiah 60:1; Isaiah 60:4; Isaiah 60:8.]! and shall not we, who are almost on the very eve of that day? We have no doubt but that all these events, which have been taking place in the world these twenty years, are preparing the way for the promised advent of our Lord. Let us then anticipate it with joy and gratitude [Note: Isaiah 52:9-10.]: let us adore our God for giving such prospects to sinful man: and let us endeavour to hasten it forward by every possible exertion in the cause of Christ.]


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Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/jeremiah-51.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

These words are spoken as in the person of the Jews, owning the destruction of Babylon,

1. To be the mighty work of God.

2. An act of justice and judgment, pleading the cause and revenging the wrongs of his people; and owning the Jewish religion, and calling one to another to go to the temple to declare what God had done for them, and to give thanks unto him for it.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-51.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. Righteousness — Literally, righteousnesses; the things which show us to be righteous.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-51.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The judgment of Babylon would vindicate God"s people (cf. Isaiah 40:2; Revelation 19:1-3). They would call on each other to glorify God in Zion by relating His great work of judging Babylon.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-51.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Jeremiah 51:10. The Lord hath brought forth our righteousness — Hath made manifest the equity of our cause, revenged the wrongs we have suffered, and shown ours to be the true religion, by bringing such remarkable judgments upon our enemies. Come, and let us declare in Zion, &c. — Therefore let us give glory to him in the assemblies of his church, and in the most public manner imaginable. This is spoken in the persons of the captive Jews.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/jeremiah-51.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Justices. We had not injured the Chaldeans, though we had offended God.


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-51.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The LORD hath brought forth our righteousness: come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the LORD our God.

The Lord hath ... Next after the speech of the confederates of Babylon comes that of the Jews, celebrating with thanksgivings the promise-keeping faithfulness of their covenant God.

Brought forth - (Psalms 37:6, "He shall bring forth thy righteousness as the light"). Our righteousness - not the Jews' merits, but God's faithfulness to Himself and to His covenant, which constituted the "righteousness" of His people - i:e., their justification in their controversy with Babylon, the cruel enemy of God and His people. (Compare Jeremiah 23:6, "The Lord our righteousness;" Micah 7:9.) Their righteousness is His righteousness.

Come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the Lord our God - (Psalms 102:13-21, "When the Lord shall build up Zion, He shall appear in his glory ... to declare the name of the Lord in Zion, and His praise in Jerusalem").


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-51.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) The Lord hath brought forth our righteousness . . .—The Hebrew noun is plural—the many righteous acts or forms of righteousness. The thought is parallel to that of Isaiah 62:1. The exile in Babylon had been a time of reformation and growth in righteousness. The day of vengeance on the oppressing city was also a day of acquittal for Israel. It was seen that she had not forfeited the favour of Jehovah. She could still sing, as of old (Judges 5:11), the righteous acts of the Lord, and would sing them, as of old, in the restored sanctuary of Zion.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-51.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The LORD hath brought forth our righteousness: come, and let us declare in Zion the work of the LORD our God.
brought
Psalms 37:6; Micah 7:9,10
let us
31:6-9; 50:28; Psalms 9:14; 102:19-21; 116:18,19; 126:1-3; Isaiah 40:2; Isaiah 51:11; 52:9,10; Revelation 14:1-3; 19:1-6

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-51.html.

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