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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 51:5

 

 

For neither Israel nor Judah has been forsaken By his God, the LORD of hosts, Although their land is full of guilt Before the Holy One of Israel.

Adam Clarke Commentary

For Israel hath not been forsaken - God still continued his prophets among them; he had never cast them wholly off. Even in the midst of wrath - highly deserved and inflicted punishment, he has remembered mercy; and is now about to crown what he has done by restoring them to their own land. I conceive אשם asham, which we translate sin, as rather signifying punishment, which meaning it often has.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-51.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

Jeremiah 51:5

For Israel hath not been forsaken, nor Judah of his God.

Israel and Judah not forsaken

You would think, according to the teaching of some, that Christ s members kept lopping off something like the limbs of lobsters, and that new ones were constantly growing. There is nothing in Scripture to warrant such a notion as that. You remember Mr. Bunyan’s parable of a child who is in a room, and a stranger comes in, and says, “Come hither, child, I will cut off thy finger.” “No,” says the child. “Yes, but I will; I will take off your little finger. Here is a knife, I will cut off your little finger.” “No,” again says the child, and begins to cry. “Oh, but,” says the stranger, “that is a poor little finger that you have. I will cut it off and I will buy you a gold finger, such a brave gold finger. I will put it on your hand instead of your little finger.” “Oh,” says the child, “but it would not be my finger; I cannot lose my little finger.” Whereupon Mr. Bunyan says, “If Christ could have better people than those He has, He would not make the change,” for, saith He, “they are not My people; they are not a part of My own living self.” So the Lord Jesus would not change you for a golden saint, for one much better than you axe. That new finger would not be what the Father gave him, nor what He bought with His precious blood. “Thou shalt not be forgotten of Me,” means that God will never cease to love His servants. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

God’s people not forgotten or forsaken

Before the siege of Paris Gustave Dore had nearly finished one of his greatest paintings, one of the finest pictures which has ever been produced. Having to fly from the city, on a sudden, as the Germans were coming up, he hid his picture in a cellar, down under a heap of rubbish. When the siege was over, Dore came back to Paris, and of course when he returned he had forgotten all about his picture, had he not? Not he; he had taken too much trouble with it to forget it. He knew the value of it, and he knew where he had put it. He did not have to go up and down the house and say to the people, “Do you know where my picture is?” No! he never forgot where he had himself put it, so he found it where it was hidden, brought it out to the light of day, and finished it. Now, in a far higher sense than that, God will have respect unto the works of His own hands. The very bodies of the saints, though they were hidden away for a while in the rubbish of the earth, He will fetch out, and He will complete the works of grace which He has begun upon each one of them. The Lord hath formed us to be His servants, we shall not be forgotten of Him. (C. H. Spurgeon.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Jeremiah 51:5". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/jeremiah-51.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For Israel hath not been forsaken, nor Judah of his God,

of the Lord of hosts,.... That is, not totally and finally; for though they might seem to be forsaken, when carried captive by their enemies, yet they were not in such sense as a woman is deprived of her husband when dead, and she is become a widow, as the wordF4אלמן "viduus, sive viduatus", Vatablus, Calvin, Montanus; "ut vidua", Pagninus; "orbus", Schmidt. used may signify; or when divorced from him; or as children are deprived of their parents, and become orphans; but so it was not with Israel; for thought they were under the frowns of Providence, and the resentment of God they had sinned against, yet the relation between them still subsisted; he was their covenant God and Father, their husband and protector, and who would vindicate them, and avenge them on their enemies:

though their land was filled with sin against the Holy One of Israel; which was the reason why they were carried captive, and so seemed to be forsaken of God; or though their land was filled with punishment, with devastation and destruction, yet nevertheless God would appear for them, and restore that and them unto it; or rather this is to be understood of the land of the Chaldeans, as it is by Jarchi and Kimchi; and be rendered, "for their land is filled with punishment for sin, from", or "by", or "because of the Holy One of Israel"F5כי ארצם מלאה אשם "quia terra illorum repleta est delicto, sive reatu, vel poena", Grotius; so some in Gataker. מקדוש ישראל "a Sancto Israelis", Montanus, Schmidt; "propter Sanctum Israelis", Vatablus, Calvin, Cocceius; so Ben Melech. ; by which it appears, that the people of God were not forsaken by him, and were not without a patron and defender of them; since it was a plain case that the land of the Chaldeans was filled with the punishment of the sword and other calamities by the Holy One of Israel, because of the sins they had committed against him, and the injuries they had done to his people. So the Targum,

"for their land is filled with, (punishment for) the sins of murder, by the word of the Holy One of Israel.'


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-51.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

For Israel [hath] not [been] b forsaken, nor Judah by his God, by the LORD of hosts; though their land was filled with sin against the Holy One of Israel.

(b) Though they were forsaken for a time, yet they were not utterly cast off as though their husbands were dead.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/jeremiah-51.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

forsaken — as a widow (Hebrew). Israel is not severed from her husband, Jehovah (Isaiah 54:5-7), by a perpetual divorce.

though … sin — though the land of Israel has been filled with sin, that is, with the punishment of their sin, devastation. But, as the Hebrew means “for,” or “and therefore,” not “though,” translate, “and therefore their (the Chaldeans‘) land has been filled with (the penal consequences of) their sin” [Grotius].


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-51.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For Israel hath not been forsaken, nor Judah of his God, of the LORD of hosts; though their land was filled with sin against the Holy One of Israel.

Forsaken — Not utterly forsaken.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-51.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The Prophet shows here the cause why God had resolved to treat the Babylonians with so much severity, even because he would be the avenger of his own people. He also obviates a doubt which might have disturbed weak minds, for he seemed to have forsaken his people when he suffered them to be driven into exile. As this was a kind of repudiation, as we have seen elsewhere, the Prophet says now, that Israel had not been wholly widowed, nor Judah, by his God; as though he had said, that the Jews and the Israelites were indeed, for a time, like widows, but this was not to be perpetual. For, as we have said, the divorce was temporary, when God so forsook his Temple and the city, that the miserable people was exposed to plunder. As long, then, as the will of their enemies prevailed, God seemed to have forsaken his people. It is of this widowhood that the Prophet now speaks; but he yet testifies that Israel would not be wholly widowed by Jehovah his God.

He indeed alludes to that spiritual marriage, of which frequent mention is made; for God had, from the beginning, united the Church to himself, as it were, by a marriage-bond; and the people, as it is well known, had been so received into covenant, that there was contracted, as it were, a spiritual marriage. Then the Prophet now says, that they were not widowed; in which he refers to the hope of deliverance; for it could not have been denied but that God had repudiated his people. But he shows that their chastisement would not be perpetual, because God would at length reconcile to himself the people from whom he had been alienated, and would restore them to the ancient condition and honor of a wife. He speaks of both kingdoms.

Then he adds, by Jehovah of hosts By this title he sets forth the power of God, as though he had said, that as God is faithful in his promises, and constantly keeps his covenant, so he is not destitute of power, so as not to be able to save his people and to rescue them, when it pleases him, from death itself. He confirms this truth, when he says, for the land of the Chaldeans is filled with sin on account of the Holy One of Israel, as though he had said, that the land was abominable, because it carried on war against God.: For when he speaks of the Holy One of Israel, he shows that God had such a care for his people that he was prepared, when the suitable time came, to show himself as their avenger. We now perceive what the Prophet means when he says, that Chaldea was filled with sin, even because it provoked God when it thought that the wrong was done only to men. (82) It follows, —

For not widowed is Israel, By his God, by Jehovah of hosts; Though their land has been filled With judgement by the Holy One of Israel.

But if we render מ before or against, then the last line would be, —

With guilt (or sin) before the Holy One of Israel.

Ed


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-51.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 51:5 For Israel [hath] not [been] forsaken, nor Judah of his God, of the LORD of hosts; though their land was filled with sin against the Holy One of Israel.

Ver. 5. For Israel hath not been forsaken.] Heb., Widowed.

Though their land was filled with sin.] Heb., Guilt, or delinquency, or devastation. The Scripture hath been fully made good to us of this nation, while the fulness of sin in us hath not yet abated the fulness of grace in God toward us. See those four gracious yets, Zechariah 1:17. {See Trapp on "Zechariah 1:17"}


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-51.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 51:5. For Israel hath not been forsaken For Israel shall not therefore be forsaken, or Judah without his God, the Lord of Hosts, because their land hath been filled with desolation by the Holy One of Israel. Houbigant. Though God was justly displeased with his people; yet he will not cast them off utterly as a nation, or deprive them of his protection, though he will do so to those who have been the rod in his hand to chastise and scourge his people.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-51.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1088

GOD’S MERCY CONTRASTED WITH OUR SINFULNESS

Jeremiah 51:5. Israel hath not been forsaken, nor Judah of Ms God, of the Lord of Hosts; though their land was filled with sin against the Holy One of Israel.

THE peculiar people of God in their most afflictive circumstances have a sure prospect of a happy deliverance. But his enemies in their most prosperous state are only like beasts fattening for the slaughter. The Jews were reduced to the lowest ebb of misery in Babylon, on account of their multiplied iniquities: yet did God promise to restore them to their native land. On the contrary, the Babylonians, who were exalted to the highest pitch of grandeur, were in due time to be altogether extirpated. Both these events were foretold by the prophet in this and the preceding chapters: and, in the text, he appeals to the Jews that they had not been forsaken, notwithstanding the abundant cause they had afforded for an utter dereliction—

From these words we shall take occasion to consider,

I. The provocations we have given to God,

1. In our national capacity—

[All “sin,” of whatever kind, is properly and primarily “against the Holy One of Israel [Note: Psalms 51:4.].” Now there is no sin, whether against the first or second table of the law, which has not abounded in this land — — — Nor is there any rank or order of men, from the highest to the lowest, that have not yielded up themselves as willing servants to sin and Satan — — — Even the flock of Christ itself, both the pastors who watch over it, and the people who compose it, have contributed in no small degree to the tremendous mass of iniquity, that has incensed our God against us — — —]

2. In our individual capacity—

[Since a sight of others’ sins rarely begets any true humiliation in us, let each of us in particular search out his own. Let our thoughts, words, and actions be strictly scrutinized. Let those sins which are more immediately against God, be inquired into; our pride, our impenitence, our unbelief, our ingratitude for temporal blessings, and especially for the unspeakable gift of God’s dear Son; our obstinate resistance of God’s Holy Spirit, together with all our neglect of duties, or our coldness in the performance of them; let these be counted up, and be set in order before us; and the very best of men will see cause for the deepest humiliation; yea, we shall wonder that we have not long since been made like to Sodom and Gomorrha.]

Having taken a view of our sins, let us contrast with them,

II. The mercies God has vouchsafed to us—

Justly have we deserved to be entirely abandoned by our God—

[The history of the Jews shews us what we ourselves deserve. He himself bids us go to Shiloh, and see what he did to it for the wickedness of his people [Note: Jeremiah 7:12. with 1 Samuel 4:10-11.]. Indeed the whole of his dealings with them in their Assyrian and Babylonish captivity, and in their present dispersion, may teach us what we might well expect at his hands — — —]

But he has not dealt with us according to our desert—

[He has “not forsaken us” as a nation. In proof of this, we appeal to the comparative lightness of our troubles—the signal interpositions with which we have been favoured in the midst of our troubles—and lastly, the happy termination of them, by a seasonable restoration both of peace and plenty [Note: October 4, 1801, on a Thanksgiving for peace and plenty.].

Nor has he forsaken us as individuals. He is yet calling us by his word, and striving with us by his Spirit. And we behold amongst us the evident tokens of his presence, in that sinners are yet awakened to repentance, and saints are edified in faith and love.]

Address—

1. Let the long-suffering of God be gratefully acknowledged—

[We should “account the long-suffering of God to be salvation [Note: 2 Peter 3:15.].” Let us not, however, rest in carnal mirth; but let his temporal mercies to our land, and his spiritual mercies to our souls, call forth our liveliest gratitude and our devoutest praise.]

2. Let it also be practically improved—

[In the words immediately following our text, the prophet says, “Flee out of the midst of Babylon, and deliver every man his own soul.” It was the duty of the Jews to cast on their bondage as soon as God should open a way for their escape. Thus must we also cast off the servitude in which we have been detained, and go forth from amongst all the enemies of God. If we continue in sin, we must take our portion with the ungodly. But if we give up ourselves unreservedly to God, he will blot out our past iniquities in the blood of his Son, and make us partakers of an everlasting salvation.


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Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/jeremiah-51.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

That is, not, utterly forsaken, for in a sense they were forsaken as to some gradual manifestations of God’s love to them, but Judah and Israel were not left as a widow, or were not divorced from God. The word translated sin signifies a most heinous sinning, or desolation, and the best interpreters judge that sin here signifieth the punishment of sin. God hath not forsaken the Jews utterly, though as they were formerly filled with grievous sins, so they be now filled with grievous judgments because of their sins.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-51.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Lord Almighty had not forsaken either Israel or Judah, even though they were guilty before the Holy One of Israel.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-51.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Forsaken, as a widow, viduatus. (Haydock) --- God still considers the nation as his spouse. --- Their land. That of the Chaldeans, (Calmet) or of the Jews. (Theodoret) --- Sin, or punishment.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-51.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Israel . . . Judah. Now one People again.

God. Hebrew. Elohim. App-4.

the LORD of Hosts. See note on Jeremiah 6:6, and 1 Samuel 1:3.

sin. Hebrew. chata.

the Holy One of Israel. See note on Psalms 71:22.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-51.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For Israel hath not been forsaken, nor Judah of his God, of the LORD of hosts; though their land was filled with sin against the Holy One of Israel.

Israel hath not been forsaken - as a widow [Hebrew, 'almaan (Hebrew #488)]. Israel is not severed from her Husband, Yahweh (Isaiah 54:5-7), by a perpetual divorce.

Though their land was filled with sin - though the land of Israel has been filled with sin - i:e., with the punishment of their sin, devastation. But, as the Hebrew means for, or and therefore, not though, translate, 'and therefore their (the Chaldeans') land has been filled with (the penal consequences of) their sin (Grotius).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-51.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) Israel hath not been forsaken.—Better, widowed. The participle is from the word that commonly represents the idea of widowhood. Judah and Israel, the prophet declares, were not, as men thought, abandoned by their husband Jehovah. He was still their protector. The prophet has in his thoughts at once the image of apparent widowhood, as in Isaiah 50:1; Isaiah 54:4-6; Lamentations 1:1, and the thought that Jehovah is, after all, as the husband ready to forgive (Jeremiah 3:4; Jeremiah 3:14; Jeremiah 3:20; Jeremiah 4:1). The assurance of this returning love does not rest on any plea in extenuation of the nation’s guilt, which the words that follow admit without reserve. For “his” it would be better to read her or their, as keeping up the metaphor.

Against the Holy One of Israel.—On Jeremiah’s use of the name, see Note on Jeremiah 50:29.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-51.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For Israel hath not been forsaken, nor Judah of his God, of the LORD of hosts; though their land was filled with sin against the Holy One of Israel.
Israel
33:24-26; 46:28; 50:4,5,20; 1 Samuel 12:22; 1 Kings 6:13; Ezra 9:9; Psalms 94:14; Isaiah 44:21; 49:14,15; 54:3-11; 62:12; Hosea 1:10; Amos 9:8,9; Romans 11:1,2
nor
Zechariah 2:12; 12:6,8
though
16:18; 19:4; 23:15; 31:37; 2 Kings 21:16; Ezekiel 8:17; 9:9; 22:24-31; Hosea 4:1; Micah 7:18,20; Zephaniah 3:1-4

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-51.html.

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