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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 51:55

 

 

For the LORD is going to destroy Babylon, And He will make her loud noise vanish from her. And their waves will roar like many waters; The tumult of their voices sounds forth.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The great voice - Its pride and insufferable boasting.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-51.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Render, “For Yahweh wasteth Babylon, and will make to cease from her the loud noise (of busy life); and their wares (the surging masses of the enemy) roar like many waters: the noise of their shouting is given forth, i. e., resounds.”


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-51.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Because the Lord hath spoiled Babylon,.... By means of the Merits and Persians; these were his instruments he made use of; to these he gave commission, power, and strength to spoil Babylon; and therefore it is ascribed to him:

and destroyed out of her the great voice; the noise of people, which is very great in populous cities, where people are passing to and fro in great numbers upon business; which ceases when any calamity comes, as pestilence, famine, or sword, which sweep away the inhabitants; this last was the case of Babylon. The Targum is,

"and hath destroyed out of her many armies:'

or it may design the great voice of the roaring revelling company in it at their feast time; which was the time of the destruction of he city, as often observed: or the voice of triumphs for victories obtained, which should be no more in it: or the voice of joy and gladness in common, as will be also the case of mystical Babylon, Revelation 18:22; this "great voice" may not unfitly be applied to the voice of antichrist, that mouth speaking blasphemies, which are long shall be destroyed out of Babylon, Revelation 13:5;

when her waves do roar like great waters, a noise of their voice is uttered; that is, when her enemies come up against her like the waves of the sea: a loud shout will be made by them, which will be very terrible, and silence the noise of mirth and jollity among the Babylonians; see Jeremiah 51:42; though some understand this of the change that should be made among the Chaldeans; that, instead of the voice of joy and triumph, there would be the voice of howling and lamentation; and even among their high and mighty ones, who would be troubled and distressed, as great waters are, when moved by tempests. The Targum is,

"and the armies of many people shall be gathered against them, and shall lift up their voice with a tumult.'


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-51.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

great voice — Where once was the great din of a mighty city, there shall be the silence of death [Vatablus]. Or, the “great voice” of the revelers (Jeremiah 51:38, Jeremiah 51:39; Isaiah 22:2). Or, the voice of mighty boasting [Calvin], (compare Jeremiah 51:53).

her waves — “when” her calamities shall cause her to give forth a widely different “voice,” even such a one as the waves give that lash the shores (Jeremiah 51:42) [Grotius]. Or, “when” is connected thus: “the great voice” in her, when her “waves,” etc. (compare Jeremiah 51:13). Calvin translates, “their waves,” that is, the Medes bursting on her as impetuous waves; so Jeremiah 51:42. But the parallel, “a great voice,” belongs to her, therefore the wave-like “roar” of “their voice” ought also belong to her (compare Jeremiah 51:54). The “great voice” of commercial din, boasting, and feasting, is “destroyed”; but in its stead there is the wave-like roar of her voice in her “destruction” (Jeremiah 51:54).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-51.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Because the LORD hath spoiled Babylon, and destroyed out of her the great voice; when her waves do roar like great waters, a noise of their voice is uttered:

The great voice — The noises caused from multitudes of people walking up and trafficking together.

A noise — The noise of her enemies that shall break in upon her shall be like the roaring of the sea.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/jeremiah-51.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The reason for the crashing is now added, even because God had resolved to lay waste Babylon, and to reduce it to nothing. Jeremiah again calls the faithful to consider the power of God. He then says, that it would not be a work done by men, because God would put forth his great power, which cannot be comprehended by human minds. He then sets the name of God in opposition to all creatures, as though he had said, that what exceeds all the efforts of men, would yet be easily done by God. He, indeed, represents God here as before our eyes, and says that Babylon would perish, but that it was God who would lay it waste. He thus sets forth God here as already armed for the purpose of cutting off Babylon. And he will destroy from her the magnificent voice, that is, her immoderate boasting.

What follows is explained by many otherwise than I can approve; for they say that the waves made a noise among the Babylonians at the time when the city was populous; for where there is a great concourse of men, a great noise is heard, but solitude and desolation bring silence. They thus, then, explain the words of the Prophet, that though now waves, that is, noises, resounded in Babylon like great waters, and the sound of their voice went forth, yet God would destroy their great or magnificent voice. But I have no doubt but that what the Prophet meant by their great voice, was their grandiloquent boasting in which the Babylonians indulged during their prosperity. While, then, the monarchy flourished, they spoke as from the height. Their silence from fear and shame would follow, as the Prophet intimates, when God checked that proud glorying.

But what follows I take in a different sense; for I apply it to the Medes and the Persians: and so there is a relative without an antecedent — a mode of speaking not unfrequent in Hebrew. He then expresses the manner in which God would destroy or abolish the grandiloquent boasting of the Babylonians, even because their waves, that is, of the Persians, would make a noise like great waters; that is, the Persians, and the Medes would rush on them like impetuous waves, and thus the Babylonians would be brought to silence and reduced to desolation. (108) When they were at peace, and no enemy disturbed them, they then gave full vent to their pride; and thus vaunting was the speech of Babylon as long as it flourished; but when suddenly the enemies made an irruption, then Babylon became silent or mute on account of the frightful sound within it. We hence see why he compares the Persians and the Medes to violent waves which would break and put an end to that sound which was before heard in Babylon. It follows, —

55.For Jehovah is laying waste Babylon and destroying her: From her comes a loud voice! And roar do their waves like great waters, Going forth is the tumult of their voice.

According to the preceding verse, the destruction of Babylon is represented as then taking place, —

54.A voice of howling from Babylon! And of great destruction from the land of the Chaldeans!

The commotions and tumults, arising from the invasion of enemies, seem to be set forth in Jeremiah 51:55; and the beginning of the following, Jeremiah 51:56, ought to be rendered in the present tense, the first verb being a participle. — Ed.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-51.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 51:55 Because the LORD hath spoiled Babylon, and destroyed out of her the great voice; when her waves do roar like great waters, a noise of their voice is uttered:

Ver. 55. Because the Lord hath spoiled Babylon.] Heb., Is spoiling. For it was long in doing; but as sure as if done together, and at once. In like sort many of the promises are not to have their full accomplishment till the end of the world; as those about the full deliverance of the godly, the destruction of the wicked, the confusion of Antichrist, &c.

And destroyed out of her the great voice.] Of the revellers and roaring boys; or of their enemies, as some rather sense it, breaking in upon them.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-51.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 51:55. And destroyed out of her the great voice When cities are populous, they are of course noisy. See Isaiah 22:2. Silence is therefore a mark of depopulation; and in this sense we are to understand God's destroying or taking away out of Babylon the great noise, which during the time of her prosperity was constantly heard there; "the busy hum of men," as the poet very expressively calls it. In this manner the mystical Babylon is threatened, Revelation 18:22-23. Compare ch. Jeremiah 7:34, Jeremiah 16:9, Jeremiah 25:10.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-51.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The sword is not so much the sword of the Medes a the sword of the Lord. It is he who is to be looked at, a the spoiler of Babylon.

And destroyed out of her the great voice; and hath made to cease in that great city the noise caused from the multitudes of people in it walking up an, down, and trafficking together. The noise of her enemies that shall break in upon her shall be like the noise and roarings of the sea, when it dasheth upon the shore or upon some rocks. That shall be the only noise shall be heard in her, instead of the noises wont there to be made from the multitude of people, or from revellers.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-51.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Great voice, or boasting and songs of joy, usual at public meetings. --- Noise. They groan under affliction.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-51.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

destroyed = caused to perish. Hebrew. "abar. Not the same as in verses: Jeremiah 51:1, Jeremiah 51:3, Jeremiah 51:8, Jeremiah 1:11, Jeremiah 1:20, Jeremiah 1:25, Jeremiah 1:54.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-51.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Because the LORD hath spoiled Babylon, and destroyed out of her the great voice; when her waves do roar like great waters, a noise of their voice is uttered:

Because the Lord hath ... destroyed out of her the great voice - where once was the great din of a might city, there shall be the silence of death (Vatablus). Or, the "great voice" of the revellers (Jeremiah 51:38-39; Isaiah 22:2). Or, the voice of mighty boasting (Calvin). Compare Jeremiah 51:53.

When her waves do roar - "when" her calamities shall cause her to give forth a widely different "voice," even such a one as the waves give that lash the shores (Jeremiah 51:42). (Grotius.) Or "when" is connected thus: 'The great voice (in her), when her waves do roar like great waters' (cf. Jeremiah 51:13). Calvin translates, 'their waves' - i:e., the Medes bursting on her as impetuous waves; so Jeremiah 51:42, "The sea is come up upon Babylon." But the parallel, a "great voice," belongs to her; therefore the wave-like "roar" of "their voice" ought also to belong to her, (cf. Jeremiah 51:54). The "great voice" of commercial din, boasting, and feasting, is "destroyed;" but in its stead there is the wave-like roar of her voice in her "destruction" (Jeremiah 51:54).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-51.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(55) Because the Lord hath spoiled Babylon . . .—In Jeremiah 51:54 the prophet hears the cry of the captured city. The “great voice” which Jehovah “destroys” or “makes to cease” is the stir and tumult of life that surged, as it were, through the city (Isa. 18:12, 13). The “waves” are those of the “sea” of the legions of her conqueror (see Jeremiah 51:42), and they “roar” while the voices that were heard before are hushed in the silence of death.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-51.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Because the LORD hath spoiled Babylon, and destroyed out of her the great voice; when her waves do roar like great waters, a noise of their voice is uttered:
destroyed
38,39; 25:10; 50:10-15; Isaiah 15:1; 24:8-11; 47:5; Revelation 18:22,23
her waves
Psalms 65:7; 93:3,4; Isaiah 17:13; Ezekiel 26:3; Luke 21:25; Revelation 17:15

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 51:55". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-51.html.

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