corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 52:1

 

 

Zedekiah was twenty-one years old when he became king, and he reigned eleven years in Jerusalem; and his mother's name was Hamutal the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Zedekiah was one and twenty years old - See 2 Kings 24:18.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-52.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Jeremiah 52:28-30, for the narrative given in 2 Kings 25:22-26, where see the notes.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-52.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

JEREMIAH 52

A HISTORICAL RECORD OF JEREMIAH'S PROPHECIES FULFILLED

This chapter is usually styled "Historical Appendix"; but its obvious application to the fulfillment of Jeremiah's prophecies suggests the title we have given it.

Although many writers speak of this chapter's being a copy of 2 Kings 24:18-25:30,[1] this is true only of certain verses in this chapter. The chapter does apparently quote from 2Kings, "but with a very significant omission (regarding events leading to the assassination of Gedaliah as given in 2 Kings 25:22-26), and a very significant addition in @@vv. 28-30 where is found material given nowhere else in the Bible."[2]

The appearance here of unique material, along with some variations from the account in 2Kings, including a variant spelling of the name of Nebuchadnezzar, led Keil to the conclusion that both of the accounts in 2Kings and in this last chapter of Jeremiah, "Have a common origin in which the fall of the Kingdom of Judah was more fully described than in the historical books of the canon."[3]

To this writer, it appears that the principal reason for including this chapter from a source independent of Jeremiah was for the specific purpose of demonstrating historically the fulfillment of his marvelous prophecies. It has also been suggested that another reason could reside in the note of hope injected into the final verses regarding the restoration of Jehoiachin to his royal status under the house-arrest of Judah's last king, but as an honored guest at the table of the king of Babylon. The captives might have received that dramatic change in the status of their former king as a good omen related to the end of their captivity and their return to Judah.

There are five things treated in this chapter: (1) Jerusalem falls, and Zedekiah is captured (Jeremiah 52:1-16); (2) the Temple is despoiled (Jeremiah 52:17-23); (3) Zedekiah's advisors were executed (Jeremiah 52:24-27); (4) the three deportations of the Jews are related (Jeremiah 52:28-30); and (5) the record of Jehoiachin's kind treatment by the new king of Babylon (Jeremiah 52:31-34).

Jeremiah 52:1-16

THE FALL OF JERUSALEM AND THE CAPTURE OF IT AND ZEDEKIAH

"Zedekiah was one and twenty years old when he began to reign; and he reigned eleven years in Jerusalem: and his mother's name was Hamutal the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah. And he did that which was evil in the sight of Jehovah, according to all that Jehoiachim had done. For through the anger of Jehovah did it come to pass in Jerusalem and Judah, until he cast them out from his presence. And Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon. And it came to pass in the ninth year of his reign, in the tenth month, in the tenth day of the month, that Nebuchadrezzar the king of Babylon came, and all his army, against Jerusalem, and encamped against it; and they built forts against it round about. So the city was besieged unto the eleventh year of king Zedekiah. In the fourth month, in the ninth day of the month, the famine was sore in the city, so that there was no bread for the people of the land. Then a breach was made in the city, and all the men of war fled, and went forth out of the city by night by way of the gate between the two walls, which was by the king's garden (now the Chaldeans were against the city round about); and they went toward Arabah. But the army of the Chaldeans pursued after the king, and overtook Zedekiah in the plains of Jericho; and all his army was scattered from him. Then they took the king, and carried him up unto the king of Babylon to Riblah in the land of Hamath; and he gave judgment upon him. And the king of Babylon slew the sons of Zedekiah before his eyes: he slew also all the princes of Judah in Riblah. And he put out the eyes of Zedekiah; and the king of Babylon bound him in fetters, and carried him to Babylon, and put him in prison till the day of his death. Now in the fifth month, in the tenth day of the month, which was the nineteenth year of king Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon, came Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard, who stood before the king of Babylon. And he burned the house of Jehovah, and the king's house, and all the houses of Jerusalem, even every great house, burned he with fire. And all the army of the Chaldeans that were with the captain of the guard, brake down all the walls of Jerusalem round about. Then Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard carried away captive of the poorest of the people, and the residue of the people that were left in the city, and those that fell away, that fell to the king of Babylon. But Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard left of the poorest of the land to be vinedressers and husbandmen."

"Through the anger of Jehovah it came to pass ..." (Jeremiah 52:3). Some have complained that this makes it appear that the anger of Jehovah caused Judah's rebellion; whereas, on the other hand, it was the result of it. Such complaints fail to notice the meaning of "through the anger of Jehovah," which does not mean "because of his anger," but is a reference to the fact that through (during) the anger of Jehovah, as revealed by the prophet Jeremiah, and in spite of his repeated warnings against it, they went right on stubbornly in their rebellion.

Practically all of this passage, although somewhat abbreviated, is found in Jeremiah 39:1-9. See comments there. The instructions of Nebuchadnezzar for Jeremiah's safety (Jeremiah 39:11f) are omitted here.

"In prison till the day of his death ..." (Jeremiah 52:11b). This note regarding Zedekiah's imprisonment till death is found "nowhere else in the Bible."[4]

"The nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar ..." (Jeremiah 52:12). This same occasion is called "the eighteenth year" of Nebuchadnezzar in Jeremiah 52:29. One mode or reckoning counted the year of accession to the throne, and the other did not. There is no contradiction.[5]


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/jeremiah-52.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Zedekiah was one and twenty years old when he began to reign,.... Whose name was Mattaniah; and who was set on the throne by the king of Babylon, in the room of his brother's son Jehoiachin, 2 Kings 24:17;

and he reigned eleven years in Jerusalem; so that he was thirty two years of age when he was taken and carried captive into Babylon:

and his mother's name was Hamutal the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah; see 2 Kings 24:18.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-52.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Jeremiah 52:1-34. Written by some other than Jeremiah (probably Ezra) as an historical supplement to the previous prophecies.

(See on Jeremiah 51:64). Jeremiah, having already (thirty-ninth and fortieth chapters) given the history in the proper place, was not likely to repeat it here. Its canonical authority as inspired is shown by its being in the Septuagint version. It contains the capture and burning of Jerusalem, etc., Zedekiah‘s punishment, and the better treatment of Jehoiachin under Evil-merodach, down to his death. These last events were probably subsequent to Jeremiah‘s time. Written by some other than Jeremiah (probably Ezra) as an historical supplement to the previous prophecies.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-52.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This Chapter contains the historical relation of the siege of Jerusalem; the capture of the city and people, and the deplorable treatment of Zedekiah and his Sons, and nobles.

Jer 52

The relation of this history hath been already gone through, almost word by word, in the book of the Kings: so that it would be to swell unnecessarily the relation on any commentary here. If the Reader will compare this Chapter with the account of the siege, and destruction of Jerusalem, as it is rehearsed at large in 2 Kings 24:18 through the whole of the 25th Chapter that follows (2Ki 25), (including only a parenthesis, as a portion before related in Jeremiah 40:16) he will find the agreement in all the particulars. I only add therefore, that we ought to pay the greater attention to those portions of the word of God, which the divine wisdom hath been pleased to have twice recorded, as demanding this respect from us. And when we consider the awful subject of which they both treat; and that, notwithstanding the Lord's love to his Church, he will not leave that Church without his severe chastisement; we have abundant reason to observe what the Apostle hath said on these solemn judgments in general, lest for our transgression; the Lord visit us also. Be not high minded but fear: for if God spared not the natural branches, take heed lest he also spare not thee? Precious Jesus! how blessed is it to see to whom our safety is alone owing; and in whom all our security stands. Lord! hasten thy kingdom, and bring home thine heritage. And let thy redeemed behold the New Testament Babylon destroyed forever, and all the enemies of our salvation; that that blessed time may soon arrive, when the kingdoms of the world shall become the kingdoms of our God and of his Christ, and he shall reign forever. Amen.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/jeremiah-52.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 52:1 Zedekiah [was] one and twenty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned eleven years in Jerusalem. And his mother’s name [was] Hamutal the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah.

Ver. 1. Zedekiah was one and twenty years old, &c.] For the exposition of this whole chapter, see the notes on 2 Kings 24:17-20; 2 Kings 25:1-30, 2 Chronicles 36:11-21, Jeremiah 39:1-3, &c. It is altogether historic, and set here fitly by Ezra, or some other prophet, as an appendix to the foregoing prophecy, and as a preface to the Book of the Lamentations, which is nothing else but Jeremiah’s elegy over their doleful captivity - not over King Josiah’s death, as Jerome would have it; nor yet is it that book that Jehoiakim cut, and afterwards cast into the fire, [Jeremiah 36:22-23] as some of the Jewish doctors have noted. The Septuagint have set this title upon it: And it came to pass after that Israel was carried captive, and Jerusalem laid waste, the prophet Jeremiah sat weeping, and wailing, and bitterly lamenting the case of his people. Thus they knit together this chapter and the ensuing Lamentations, which the Jews also are still said to read together in their synagogues on the ninth day of the month Ab, which answereth to our July, because that on that day the city was taken and destroyed by the Chaldeans. [Jeremiah 52:7] (a)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-52.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 52:1. Zedekiah was one-and-twenty years old The present chapter, seems to belong to the book of Lamentations, and serves as a kind of proem to them. The generality of commentators are agreed, that this chapter could not be added by Jeremiah, not only because a great part of it is a repetition of what he himself had related in the 39th and 40th chapters of his prophesy, but because mention is made in it of the reign of Evil-merodach; and of some transactions which happened at the end of Jeconiah's reign, and after Jeremiah's death. Indeed, the chapter is chiefly taken out of the latter part of the second book of Kings, with some few additions, probably supplied by Ezra. It is therefore most reasonable, to conclude, that this chapter was added by Ezra, who designed this brief history of the desolations of the Jewish nation as an introduction to the book of Lamentations. See Grotius, Calmet, and the notes on 2 Kings 24:18; 2 Kings 24:20 to the end of chap. 25:


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-52.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Zedekiah (Mattaniah, 2 Kings 24:17) was the last king of the Davidic dynasty to rule over Judah from Jerusalem. He was21years old when he began reigning in597 B.C. Nebuchadnezzar selected him to rule after Zedekiah"s nephew Jehoiachin proved unfaithful ( 2 Kings 24:17). Zedekiah ruled as Nebuchadnezzar"s vassal for11years, until the destruction of Jerusalem in586 B.C. His mother, the queen mother, was Hamutal, the daughter of a certain Jeremiah of Libnah. "Queen mothers" exercised considerable authority, and enjoyed great prestige in ancient Near Eastern countries, which accounts for Hamutal"s mention here (cf. Jeremiah 13:18).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-52.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Sedecias. This is purely historical, taken from 4 Kings xxiv. 18., &c. Many doubt with reason the Jeremias inserted it, as he could not well be alive at the time when Joakim was honoured, ver. 31. If he had written both this and the Book of Kings, the variations which we here discover would not be seen. It seems, therefore, that Esdras or some other has inserted it, to explain the fall of Jerusalem and the lamentations; as a similar addition has been made to Isaias, chap. xxxvi., &c. See Grotius. (Calmet) --- The history occurs more at large, Paralipomenon ultra.[last chapter?] (Worthington)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-52.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Zedekiah. Compare 2 Kings 24:18-20. Reigned from 489 to 477 B.C.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-52.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Zedekiah was one and twenty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned eleven years in Jerusalem. And his mother's name was Hamutal the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah.

Jeremiah having already (Jeremiah 39:1-18; Jeremiah 40:1-16) given the history in the proper place, was not likely to repeat it here. Its canonical authority as inspired is shown by its being in the Septuagint version. It contains the capture and burning of Jerusalem, etc, Zedekiah's punishment, and the better treatment of Jehoiachin under Evil-merodach, down to his death. These last events were probably subsequent to Jeremiah's time.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-52.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Zedekiah was one and twenty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned eleven years in Jerusalem. And his mother's name was Hamutal the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah.
A. M. 3406-3416. B.C. 598-588. one
2 Kings 24:18; 2 Chronicles 36:11
begin to reign
Heb. reigned. Libnah.
Joshua 10:29; 15:42

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 52:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-52.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology