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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Jeremiah 9:26

 

 

Egypt and Judah, and Edom and the sons of Ammon, and Moab and all those inhabiting the desert who clip the hair on their temples; for all the nations are uncircumcised, and all the house of Israel are uncircumcised of heart."

Adam Clarke Commentary

All that are in the utmost corners - פאה קצוצי כל col ketsutsey pheah . These words have been variously understood. The Vulgate translates: Omnes qui attonsi sunt in comam; "All who have their hair cut short." The Targum, Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic have understood it nearly in the same way; and so our margin. Others think that the insular or peninsular situation of the people is referred to. Dr. Blayney thinks the Arabians are meant, who dwelt in the great desert, between Mesopotamia and Palestine. I really think our marginal reading should be preferred, as expressing the sense of all the ancient Versions.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/jeremiah-9.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

All that are in the utmost corners - Really, all who have the corners of their hair shorn. The people meant are those Arabs who cut the hair close upon the forehead and temples, but let it grow long behind. See Leviticus 19:27.

For all these nations are uncircumcised - Or, “for all the pagan are uncircumcised.” circumcision probably prevailed partially in the pagan mysteries as a sign of special sanctity, but to the Jews alone it represented their covenant-relation to God.


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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/jeremiah-9.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Egypt, and Judah, and Edom, and the children of Ammon, and Moab,.... Places and people among which the Jews were dispersed, and whose punishment is predicted in Jeremiah chapters forty six through forty nine, and whose countries are now under the dominion of the Turks:F8Written about 1750. Editor. .

and all that are in the utmost corners, that dwell in the wilderness; who dwelt in the desert of Arabia; these, according to Kimchi, were the Kedarenes, and the kingdoms of Hazor, a people that dwelt in the utmost corners, whom Nebuchadnezzar smote, as Jeremiah foretold, Jeremiah 49:28. Jarchi's note is,

"them that are cut off in a corner of the wilderness;'

that live by themselves, and have no communication with other people; were at the greatest distance, and secure; dwelt alone, and had neither gates nor bars, as is said of the same people, Jeremiah 49:31. The Septuagint version is, "upon everyone that shaves what is about his face, that dwells in the wilderness"; and so the Syriac and Arabic versions; to which agrees the Targum,

"upon all that round the corners of the head, that dwell in habitations in the wilderness,'

The Arabians used to shave the extreme hairs of the head round about, as the forehead, temples, and behind the ears, which are the corners of the head; so HerodotusF9In Thalia, vel l. 3. c. 8. reports of them, who seem to be meant here; though some think the Jews are intended, to whom this was forbidden, Leviticus 19:27,

for all these nations are uncircumcised; in the flesh; though they were not punished on this account, because it was not commanded them, as Kimchi observes; but is mentioned to show that the Jews were no better than they, though circumcised, and that they should be punished together:

and all the house of Israel are uncircumcised in the heart; had not the circumcision made without hands; or were not circumcised in heart, to love the Lord, fear and serve him; the foreskin of their flesh taken off availed not so long as that on their heart remained, and they were stupid, impenitent, and disobedient.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/jeremiah-9.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Egypt — put first to degrade Judah, who, though in privileges above the Gentiles, by unfaithfulness sank below them. Egypt, too, was the power in which the Jews were so prone to trust, and by whose instigation they, as well as the other peoples specified, revolted from Babylon.

in the utmost corners — rather, “having the hair shaven (or clipped) in angles,” that is, having the beard on the cheek narrowed or cut: a Canaanitish custom, forbidden to the Israelites (Leviticus 19:27; Leviticus 21:5). The Arabs are hereby referred to (compare Jeremiah 25:23; Jeremiah 49:32), as the words in apposition show, “that dwell in the wilderness.”

uncircumcised … uncircumcised in the heart — The addition of “in the heart” in Israel‘s case marks its greater guilt in proportion to its greater privileges, as compared with the rest.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/jeremiah-9.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

However this may be, the Prophet here denounces ruin, not only on the Jews, but also on the Egyptians and on other neighboring nations; but he yet speaks to his own people, for his word was not destined for the Egyptians, nor for the Idumeans and the Moabites. But as the Jews were wont to have recourse to the Egyptians, when any danger arose from the Assyrians and Chaldeans, the Prophet here connects the Egyptians with the Jews, and for the same reason, the other nations. We indeed know that the Idumeans and the Moabites were most hostile enemies to the Jews; but as the state of things changed, they were at one time their enemies, at another their friends; and when they saw that the Chaldeans extended their power, they saw also that they were exposed to plunder, and hence it happened that they willingly helped the Jews. Since then the Hebrews hoped that their neighbors on every side would aid them, the Prophet says that a visitation was nigh them all: and hence is confirmed what I have already said; for he distinguishes not the Jews from the Egyptians and other nations; but, on the contrary, as they had made alliances with them, he intends to unite them in one body: I will visit, he says, the circumcised with the uncircumcision For the Jews did not bear in mind that God was the protector of their safety, and that they had been set apart by him from other nations. He names the circumcised together with the uncircumcision, because the Egyptians, the Idumeans, the Ammonites, and the Moabites, were deemed circumcised on account of the covenant they had made with the Jews; and the Jews were deemed uncircumcised, because they had forsaken God, and thus profarted themselves.

It is indeed true that the Idumeans were circumcised, for they were the descendants of Esau, and had no doubt retained this external symbol; but their circumcision was altogether a mockery, as Esau had departed from the Church of God. The circumcision of the elect people was in itself efficacious; but as they had alike fallen into superstitions, they were like the uncircumcised, according to what Paul says, — that the letter of the circumcision, that is, the external rite, was nothing. We hence see that there is no common propriety in the Prophet’s words, when he denounces vengeance on the Jews as well as on the Egyptians, and names the circumcised with the uneircumcision; for the latter had uncircumcision, the former circumcision, and thus they had blended profane and sacred things together, so that there was nothing pure or uncorrupted: and hence he mentions Egypt, Judah, Edom, the children of Ammon, and Moab We have before stated why he enumerated all these nations; he did so, because they expected help from one another, so that they all despised God.

He afterwards adds, And all the extreme ones in a corner The word קף, kots, means the end; hence they take קצוצים, kotsutsim, here for extremities: and פאה pae, signifies a corner, and an end. We might then, if propriety of language would bear it, render the words thus, “the cornered in the corner.” But the meaning is by no means ambiguous, which is, that though the Moabites and others had hidden recesses, they could not be exempt from the calamity. God’s vengeance shall come, says Jeremiah, into their farthest corners, where they think that they dwell in safety. And what follows is explanatory, the inhabitants of the wilderness, or, those who dwell in the wilderness. He thus shews what he meant by קצוצי פאה kotsutsi pae, the extremities, of the corner. For when people inhabit remote places, they regard themselves on that account safer, being secure in their hiding — places: this confidence the Prophet derides; and he says that punishment would reach them also. (257)

He then adds, For all the nations are uncircumcised, and the whole house of Israel is uncircumcised in heart By saying, that all nations were uncircumcised, he doubtless includes the Israelites, and thus by way of reproach he takes away from the chosen people their peculiar distinction; as though he had said, that Israel was so mixed with the nations, that they only made a part of them: the Jews would have otherwise denied, that they deserved to be classed with the Gentiles; but the Prophet deprives them of every excuse, and says that they were but one nation, having no difference: All these nations then are uncircumcised And so ה He, before גוים guim, nations, may be taken as a demonstrative pronoun, and not a relative, “All these nations.” He had spoken not only of the Egyptians and the Idumeans and of other neighboring nations, but had also mentioned Judah. He then says, “All these nations are uncircumcised:” and as I have already said, he condemns Israel, because they differed nothing from the nations, though God had consecrated them to himself; for there was an entire mingling, which made them all equal.

But as some objection might still be alleged, he says, the Jews are uncircumcised in heart He had indeed already included them in the nations; but it was necessary to insist more on this point, for circumcision might have been pleaded by them. Hence the Prophet says, that though they had the visible symbol in the flesh, they were yet uncircumcised in heart, and ought therefore to be classed with the nations. We see how sharply he reproves them: though he separates them from other nations, he yet shews that they justly deserved to be numbered with them; for God cares not for the external symbol, but regards the chief thing, the circumcision of the heart.

It is a common thing with Moses and the Prophets to call an unrenewed heart, uncircumcision, and to say that the people are uncircumcised in heart: for circumcision, while an evidence of free salvation in Christ, at the same time initiated the Jews into the worship and service of God, and proved the necessity of a new life; it was in short a sign both of repentance and of faith. When, therefore, the Jews presented only the sign, they were justly derided by Moses and the prophets; for they seemed as though they sought to pacify God by a thing of nought, without regarding the end. The same is the case now when we boast of baptism alone, and are at the same time destitute of repentance and faith: our boasting is absurd and ridiculous. And hence Paul calls the external rite, when the sign is separated from its reality and substance, the letter of the circumcision; and on the other hand he calls that the true circumcision, which is in secret and in the spirit. We may also say the same of baptism, — that the literal baptism avails hypocrites nothing, for they receive only the naked sign: and therefore we must come to the spirit of baptism, to the thing itself; for the interior power is renovation, when our old man is crucified in us, and when we rise again with Christ into newness of life.

25.Behold the days are coming, saith Jehovah, That I will visit every one circumcised, Who is in uncircumcision, —

26.The Egyptians and Judah, Edom also and the children of Ammon and Moab, And all the shawn on the side of the head, Who dwell in the desert; For all these nations are uncircumcised; And all the house of Israel, — They are uncircumcised in heart.

It is justly remarked by Horsley that the nations here mentioned practiced circumcision. They were hence circumcised, and yet in uncircumcision; and the Jews were like them: and the last line explains this apparent contradiction: they had the outward but not the inward circumcision. — Ed.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/jeremiah-9.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Jeremiah 9:26 Egypt, and Judah, and Edom, and the children of Ammon, and Moab, and all [that are] in the utmost corners, that dwell in the wilderness: for all [these] nations [are] uncircumcised, and all the house of Israel [are] uncircumcised in the heart.

Ver. 26. That are in the utmost corners.] Heb., Praecisos in lateribus, polled by the corner; (a) which was the Arabian fashion, saith Herodotus. See Jeremiah 49:32.

For all these nations are uncircumcised,] scil., In heart, though circumcised in the flesh, as now also the Turks are.


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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/jeremiah-9.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

MY soul! look at the Prophet in his tender concern for Israel! Look at the Lord God of the Prophets in his unparalleled compassion over our nature, and then ask, what must be the hardened state of the human heart, in the contemplation of the sins and sorrows of life, unmoved and unconcerned? Oh! who that beholds the vast domain of Satan's empire, but must cry out, oh! that my head were waters, and mine eyes a fountain of tears! Precious Lord Jesus! though my habitation is in the midst of deceit, and I am constrained to dwell in the midst of Kedar, yet Lord, do thou melt my soul, and try me, and in thy faithfulness, cause me to be found faithful!

Where shall I find relief in such views of the general, yea the universal, depravity of human nature, but in thee, who art the Lord my righteousness? Thou art indeed the wisdom, the power, the grace, the goodness of God, and art made so to all thy people. Henceforth, Lord! grant that I may never glory but in thee. Thou wilt be wisdom to me, for in thee are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge! Thou art my might, for thou art my light, and the strength of my life, and my portion forever. And thou art riches, yea durable riches and righteousness. And all these art thou made of God to thy people, wisdom, righteousness, sanctification and redemption. Never then blessed Jesus may I henceforth glory but in thee, the Lord my God.


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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/jeremiah-9.html. 1828.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Jeremiah 9:26. And all that are in the utmost corners All having the angular tonsure, or, having the corners of their hair polled. The reader will find a more particular account of these nations, who drank of the cup of the Lord's fury after Jerusalem had drunk it, in ch. Jeremiah 25:17, &c. They used circumcision as well as the Jews; but are here called uncircumcised, as being in the same state with Israel; that is to say, uncircumcised in heart. Respecting the tonsure of the Arabs, see the note on Leviticus 19:27.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, With bitter grief the prophet beheld the sins of his people, and the ruin which they provoked.

1. He wishes that his head were waters, and his eyes a fountain of tears, that streams incessant might run down his cheeks for the miseries that he foresaw. Weary of dwelling amid so polluted a people, and that he might give full vent to his sorrows, or be removed from the dreadful spectacle before him, he wishes for some desert, some lonely cave; preferring the company of the savages of the wood to so wicked a nation; and safer amid the lions of the forest, than his own treacherous and cruel countrymen. Note; (1.) A good man must be a patriot, and cannot, unmoved, behold the ruin of his country. (2.) They who suffer nothing to interrupt their carnal joy, must never hope to receive the blessedness promised to those that mourn. (3.) It is a dreadful symptom of the wickedness, and a sign of the approaching ruin of a people, when the souls of God's prophets, like Lot, are vexed with their abominations, and weary of dwelling in the midst of them. 2. The causes of these complaints are,

[1.] The sins of his people. They were all adulterers, corporally and spiritually; an assembly of treacherous men, apostates from God and his worship, and false and faithless one to another; bending their tongues like their bow for lies; destitute of all zeal for truth, yea, rather opposing it with all their power; proceeding from evil to worse, instead of repenting and reforming; ignorant of God, and desiring to remain so. Not a neighbour, no, not a brother could be trusted, so selfish and perfidious were they grown. Lies were become familiar to their tongue, and slander the constant topic of their conversation; and no truth was to be expected from them. They spared no pains to compass their ends; they weary themselves to commit iniquity, so eagerly were they bent on it. In the midst of such a people the prophet dwelt, and therefore had need be on his guard against them; nor wonder if they acted deceitfully with him, when they acted hypocritically towards God, as the latter clause of Jeremiah 9:6 may be interpreted. Through the delusions of their false prophets they refused to receive the knowledge of God: no arrow was sharper than their bitter and lying words: and while the guise of friendship and peace seemed to breathe in all their discourse, mischief was in their hearts, and they lay in wait to make a prey of those whom they had deluded. Note; (1.) Lewdness and lying are among the most deadly and prevailing iniquities. (2.) To be silent, and refuse to espouse the suffering cause of God and truth, is highly criminal. (3.) They who have accustomed themselves to a habit of lying, will not speak truth, even when they have no purpose or design to serve, but lie for lying's sake. (4.) The service of sin is usually a wearisome task; and yet so enslaved are sinners to the love of it, that, though the pain exceeds the pleasure, they pursue it yet again, and take more pains to go to hell, than was requisite to carry them to heaven. (5.) There is no stopping in the way of wickedness; every sin indulged opens a way for a greater. (6.) In a wicked and deceitful world we need be ever on our guard.

[2.] The sufferings of his people. They shall be put into the hottest furnace of affliction, to melt and try them, since all other methods have proved ineffectual. The sword shall be bathed in blood, the country wasted, the villages burnt, the lowing herds and bleating sheep no more be heard on the mountains, plundered and carried off by the Chaldean army; not a living creature seen passing through the desolate land; even the wild beasts and the fowls of heaven shall desert it, unable to find food for their hunger, except the dragons, who take up their abode in the ruined palaces of Jerusalem; and so utter will be the overthrow, that not an inhabitant shall remain in all the cities of Judah. Thus will God visit for their iniquities, and his soul be avenged on such a people as this. Note; (1.) In the severest of the afflictions that God lays upon any land, he intends to make the same fire which consumes the wicked, a means of purifying the remaining faithful, and separating them as silver from the dross. (2.) The iniquities of the people have often turned a fruitful land into barrenness. (3.) The prophet who beholds these desolations cannot withhold the tear of pity; yea, his eyes are fountains to bewail them: and when we look round upon the world which lieth in wickedness, and see that great day of the perdition of ungodly men approach, ought we not to be more affected at a sight so unspeakably more terrible?

2nd, If the people perish, it is not for want of awful and repeated warnings.

1. A summons is given to the wise men among them, to understand and declare the cause of these calamities; but, as no such are found, the prophet himself is commissioned to proclaim both the reason of God's judgments and the terribleness of the vengeance which he is about to execute. Their sin is, apostacy from the worship and service of God commanded in the law, and disobedience against all the warnings and notices that he had sent unto them; in direct opposition to which, they followed the imaginations of their own wicked hearts, and served Baalim, a multitude of false gods, plunging into idolatry after their fathers' example, and filling up the measure of their iniquities. Most righteous therefore, and just as fearful, are God's judgments upon them. They shall be fed with bread of wormwood, and water of gall, the bitterest afflictions. The sword and the famine shall devour them, and their carcases lie unburied on the plain as dung, or as a handful dropped after the harvest-man, which is not regarded or gathered up; and if a few escape the general massacre, they shall be scattered in heathen lands, which their fathers never knew, and even there shall find no rest, the sword of vengeance still pursuing them till they are consumed. Note; (1.) Every step of departure from God tends only to misery. (2.) Wherever the sinner flies, or is driven, the curse of God follows him closer than his shadow.

2. A summons is sent to the mourning women. It was customary among the Jews, as well as other nations, to hire such on the decease of their relations, who, by their cries, their doleful plaints, and melancholy ditties, awakened afresh the sorrows of the survivors. There would now be abundant occasion for them, when the multitude of deaths by famine and the sword should fill every house with lamentation, and cause not merely fictitious, but real anguish; when out of Zion the voice of wailing is heard, How are we spoiled! we are greatly confounded, at seeing their city stormed and taken, themselves captives, driven from their dwellings, and forced from their own, are led into a strange land. Under such a dire calamity God calls on them, as most befitting their circumstances, to weep and wail. The word is addressed to the women, whose husbands probably had fallen in the siege; and, the men being chiefly slain, scarcely any but they remained to lament the desolations. They are enjoined to teach their daughters wailing, and every one her neighbour lamentation. So universal would be the misery, that none would be exempted from feeling it, and therefore all are called to bewail it. For death is come up into our windows, like an enemy that scales the walls, though the gates are shut; and is entered into our palaces: the king on the throne, as well as the beggar on the dunghill, is exposed to the famine and the sword; and even the children in the streets are murdered; and the young men, unable to make resistance, are slain by their cruel enemies, who have stormed the city. Note; (1.) This is a vale of tears, where death continually spreads his ravages, and wakens up our sorrows. (2.) No palaces can keep out this invader: kings and princes are dying worms. (3.) To grieve for the dead is natural, humane, pious; only let us not be swallowed up with immoderate sorrow. (4.) Many lament their losses and crosses bitterly, who never lament their sins, which are the occasion of them; and this is the sorrow of the world which worketh death.

3rdly, Having foretold their impending calamities, the prophet concludes with a warning to them, not to have recourse to those vain confidences which would prove a refuge of lies; but to take that only method which remained of preventing their ruin, returning to the knowledge of God, and obedience to his will.

1. He warns them against depending on their own wisdom, power, and wealth, to protect them; and directs them to the only sure refuge. Let not the wise man glory in his wisdom; as if by his politics he could avert the storm: neither let the mighty man glory in his might, which would afford no safety when fighting against God. Let not the rich man glory in his riches; as if these could bribe the invaders, or hire auxiliaries to defend them; for vain would these things prove. If therefore any man would have solid grounds for glorying, it must be in this, that he understandeth, and knoweth me, the only object in whom a sinner can glory; that I am the Lord, the only hope, help, and Saviour of the guilty; which exercise loving-kindness, judgment, and righteousness in the earth; shewing mercy to the miserable, pardoning the sinful, strengthening the weak, just in all his providences, and righteous in all his ways; for in these things I delight, saith the Lord. Note; (1.) Worldly supports are often a dangerous snare. Wisdom, strength, and riches, are apt to swell the heart with pride and self-importance, and then they prove our ruin. (2.) Christ is our only glory. Without him we have nothing but what we had need to be ashamed of, and renounce; in him there is all fulness. (3.) What is God's delight, should be ours; and to be partakers of his compassions, to walk in his judgments, and be found in the practice of righteousness and true holiness, will be infinitely more profitable than the higher attainment of worldly wisdom, or the greater possessions of worldly wealth.

2. He warns them against trusting in their peculiar privileges; as promising themselves, because of the covenant of circumcision, that they should be preserved from evil; for this would stand them in no stead while their hearts were uncircumcised, and they continued devoted to the service, not of the Lord, but of their lusts; therefore they would share with Egypt and Edom, and the neighbouring uncircumcised nations, in their punishment, and find no distinction in the day when God arose to judgment. Note; Our partaking of the outward privileges and seals of the covenant will stand us in no stead, if we are destitute of the inward and spiritual grace; yea, will rather aggravate our guilt. The baptized, unconverted, and unhumbled sinner, will meet even a heavier doom than the unbaptized unconverted heathen.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/jeremiah-9.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

In the utmost corners: some refer this to the place of their habitation, as in corners, and remote parts of the wilderness, as it were separated from other nations, and therefore might think themselves furthest remote from danger; but some rather choose to refer it to their manners, as in cutting the corners of their hair, which was forbidden the Jews, Leviticus 19:27. The like description in Jeremiah 25:23.

Uncircumcised in the heart: see the foregoing verse. God regards not the outward sign, but principally respects the circumcision of the heart. Here ends that sermon that began at Jer. vii.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/jeremiah-9.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26. Egypt… Judah, etc. — Many commentators, and among them Ewald and Nagelsbach, understand from this passage that all the peoples enumerated practised the rite of circumcision. But there is not sufficient historical proof of this; indeed there is positive evidence to the contrary. For instance. Josephus (Ant., Jeremiah 13:9; Jeremiah 13:1) tells how John Hyrcanus offered the Edomites the alternative of circumcision, which they accepted. We conclude, then, that the statement, all these nations are uncircumcised, means all nations besides Israel, and that the word “these,” which the translators have inserted, should be thrown out.

All that are in the utmost corners — Rather, all who have the corners of their hair shorn. The allusion is to certain Arabian tribes who were accustomed to crop the edges of the beard, and to cut off the hair from the temples, a practice forbidden to the Israelites. Leviticus 19:27.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/jeremiah-9.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

This would include the Gentile nations that practiced circumcision as well as Israel. There was no essential difference between these nations and Israel, since they all practiced the superficial requirement of the Mosaic Law, but had not really devoted themselves to the Lord wholeheartedly (cf. Genesis 17:9-14). They were the circumcised of body but not of heart (cf. Jeremiah 4:4; Jeremiah 6:10; Leviticus 26:41; Deuteronomy 10:16; Deuteronomy 30:6; Romans 2:25-29). It was only what circumcision symbolized that Yahweh accepted, not just the practice of the rite by itself. Certain Arab tribes trimmed their hair away from their temples (cf. Jeremiah 25:23; Jeremiah 49:32), which the Law prohibited the Israelites from doing ( Leviticus 19:27), but they did practice circumcision. Thus, Judah was no better than her neighbors, and could expect punishment, just as the pagan nations could.


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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/jeremiah-9.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Egypt. the uncircumcised shall be punished as well as Juda, if they transgress. Only the Jewish nation properly observed the right of circumcision generally, or at first. Others imitated them, but with various ceremonies. (Calmet, Diss.) (Ezechiel xxxi. 18., and Judith xiv. 6.) --- Hyrcan obliged the Idumeans to receive circumcision. (Josephus, Antiquities xiii. 17.) --- Round. The Arabs, &c., Leviticus xix. 27. (Calmet) --- Heart. All then became guilty, Romans ii. 25. (Menochius) --- Neither these nations nor Juda was circumcised in heart, and of course were hypocrites. (Worthington)

 


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/jeremiah-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

children = sons.

that are in the utmost corners: or, all that have the corners of their beard polled. Reference to Pentateuch (Leviticus 19:27). App-92. Compare Jeremiah 49:32.

uncircumcised. Supply Ellipsis, from the next clause: "uncircumcised [in heart], and all", &c.

the house of Israel. See note on Jeremiah 2:4.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/jeremiah-9.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Egypt, and Judah, and Edom, and the children of Ammon, and Moab, and all that are in the utmost corners, that dwell in the wilderness: for all these nations are uncircumcised, and all the house of Israel are uncircumcised in the heart. Egypt - put first, to degrade Judah, who, though in privileges above the Gentiles, by unfaithfulness sank below them. Egypt, too, was the power in which the Jews were so prone to trust, and by whose instigation they, as well as the other peoples specified, revolted from Babylon.

All that are in the utmost corners , [ q


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/jeremiah-9.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) Egypt, and Judah . . .—The nations enumerated were all alike, the Egyptians certainly (Herod. ii. 36, 37), and the others, as belonging to the same race as Judah, probably, in the fact of circumcision, and are apparently brought together not without some touch of scornful humour. How could Israel pride itself in that which it had in common with some of the nations that it most abhorred. The later Idumaeans seem to have abandoned the practice till it was forced upon them by John Hyrcanus (Joseph., Ant. xi. 9, ). Jerome (in loc.) affirms that the nations named practised circumcision in his time, and its adoption by Islam indicates its prevalence among the Arabs in that of Mahomet.

All that are in the utmost corners.—Better, all that have the corners (of their temples) shorn. The epithet, like our “cross-eared” or “round-head,” was obviously one of scorn, and was applied (as again in Jeremiah 25:23; Jeremiah 49:32) to a wild Arabian tribe who, as described by Herodotus (3:8), shaved their temples and let their hair grow long behind. The “wilderness” is the Arabian desert to the east of Palestine, inhabited by the Ishmaelites and other kindred races. As if to complete the contempt which he pours on circumcision, the prophet speaks of the barbarous people, whose customs were specially forbidden to Israel (Leviticus 19:27), as in this respect standing on the same level with Israel. If circumcision by itself were enough to secure immunity from judgment, they too, as practising a rite analogous though not identical, might claim it.

All these nations are uncircumcised.—The English Version makes the prophet say exactly the opposite of what he really said. All the heathen (not “these nations”) are in God’s sight as uncircumcised, whether they practise the outward rite or not—and the state of Israel was not a whit better than theirs, for she too was uncircumcised in heart. Once again Jeremiah is the forerunner of St. Paul’s Romans 2:25-29. It may be noted that the same nations are enumerated afterwards as coming under Nebuchadnezzar’s conquests (Jeremiah 25:23).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/jeremiah-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Egypt, and Judah, and Edom, and the children of Ammon, and Moab, and all that are in the utmost corners, that dwell in the wilderness: for all these nations are uncircumcised, and all the house of Israel are uncircumcised in the heart.
Egypt
25:9-26; 27:3-7; 46:1-52; Isaiah 13:1-24; Ezekiel 24:1-32; Amos 1:1-2; Zephaniah 1:1-2
Judah
Isaiah 19:24,25
in the utmost corners
Heb. cut off into corners; or, having the corners of their hair polled. Dr. Durell and others justly consider the marginal reading as far preferable; as being descriptive of the mode in which the Arabians cut their hair and beard. (See Notes on Le 21:5.)
25:23; 49:32
uncircumcised in
4:4; Leviticus 26:41; Deuteronomy 30:6; Ezekiel 44:7,9; Acts 7:51; Romans 2:28,29

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Jeremiah 9:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/jeremiah-9.html.

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