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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Lamentations 3:13

 

 

He made the arrows of His quiver To enter into my inward parts.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The arrows of his quiver - אשפתו בני beney ashpatho, "The sons of his quiver." The issue or effect; the subject, adjunct, or accident, or produce of a thing, is frequently denominated its son or child. So arrows that issue from a quiver are here termed the sons of the quiver.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/lamentations-3.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"He hath caused the shafts of his quiver

to enter into my reins.

I am become a derision to all my people,

and their song all the day.

He hath filled me with bitterness,

he hath sated me with wormwood.

He hath also broken my teeth with gravel stones;

he hath covered me with ashes.

And thou hast removed my soul far off from peace;

I forgat prosperity.

And I said, My strength is perished,

and mine expectation from Jehovah."

"I am become a derision to all my people ... their song all the day" (Lamentations 3:14). "Here Jeremiah drops all metaphor and shows exactly what is meant by all those `arrows' he mentioned."[20] Note also that the entire nation `all my people' know who this sufferer is; and they have made him the butt of public ridicule and taunting songs. It is just too bad that the critics don't know who he was! "What other person (except Jeremiah) was the cynosure of all eyes as was Jeremiah"?[21] He hath broken my teeth with gravel (Lamentations 3:16). This is very likely more metaphor describing Jeremiah's sorrow; but Cheyne thought of it as a literal reference to what happened to the Jews in exile. They had to bake their bread in pits dug in the ground, "And they were obliged to eat bread with grit in it."[22]

"My strength is perished and mine expectation from Jehovah" (Lamentations 3:18). We read this as hyperbole for the near- despair that tempted Jeremiah; however the next section of the chapter will indicate, as Cook noted, that, "He soon reaches firm ground."[23]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/lamentations-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He hath caused the arrows of his quiver,.... Or, "the sons of his quiver"F9בני אשפתו "filios pharetrae suae", Montanus, Munster, Cocceius, Michaelis. ; an usual Hebraism; the quiver is compared, as Aben Ezra observes, to a pregnant woman; and Horace has a like expression, "venenatis gravidam sagittis pharetram"F11L. 1. Ode 22. ; the judgments of God are often signified by this metaphor, even his four sore ones, sword, famine, pestilence, and noisome beast, Deuteronomy 32:23; these, says the prophet, he caused

to enter into my reins; that is, into the midst of his land and people, or into the city of Jerusalem; or these affected his mind and heart as if so many arrows had stuck in him, the poison of which drank up his spirits, Job 6:4.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/lamentations-3.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

He goes on with the same metaphor; he said in the last verse that God had leveled his bow; he now adds, that his arrows had penetrated into his reins, that is, into his inward parts. But we must bear in mind what the Prophet meant, that God had dealt so severely with the people, that no part, even the innermost, was sound or untouched, for his arrows had perforated their very reins. He afterwards adds, —


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/lamentations-3.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Lamentations 3:13 He hath caused the arrows of his quiver to enter into my reins.

Ver. 13. He hath caused the arrows of his quiver to enter into my reins.] (a) Heb., The sons of his quiver, by a Hebraism. So Horace hath -

Pharetram gravidam sagittis. ” - Lib, ii. od. 21.

“Full quiver of arrows.”

Job hath many like complaints. [Job 7:20; Job 8:4; Job 16:12-13]


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/lamentations-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Lamentations 3:13. The arrows of his quiver The sons of his quiver. Houbigant. It is usual in the Hebrew to call the subject, adjunct, accident, effect, &c. the son of that particular thing. Hence it is that the Hebrew prophets represent nations, countries, and people, under the image of a woman; and it must be ascribed to the same principle, that arrows are here called the sons of the quiver. See Bishop Lowth's Prelections.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/lamentations-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

That is, he hath made his judgments to pierce the most inward parts of the nation; or, he hath mortally wounded me. In the Hebrew it is,

the daughters of his quiver, a way of speaking very usual in Hebrew, to express any thing that comes from another as the effect either of a natural or moral cause; so sparks are called the sons of the quick coal, Job 5:7, and corn the son of the floor, &c.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/lamentations-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13. Arrows of his quiver — Better, as the margin, sons “of his quiver.” These are, of course, the ills and misfortunes sent upon him by God.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/lamentations-3.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

arrows = sons. Figure of speech Hypocatastasis. As "sparks" are called "sons of the flame".


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/lamentations-3.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) The arrows of his quiver.—Literally, children. The other side of the analogy appears in Psalms 127:5.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/lamentations-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He hath caused the arrows of his quiver to enter into my reins.
arrows
Heb. sons.
Deuteronomy 32:23; Job 6:4; 41:28

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Lamentations 3:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/lamentations-3.html.

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